cushion – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English cusshon, cuschen, quesshon, from later Previous French coissin (trendy coussin), from Vulgar Latin *coxīnus (seat pad), derived from Latin coxa (hip, thigh) with the suffix probably after Latin pulvīnus (pillow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cushion (countable and uncountable, plural cushions)

Cushion.jpg
  1. A mushy mass of fabric stuffed right into a material bag, used for consolation or help; for sitting on, kneeling on, resting one’s head on and so forth.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, in The Tremarn Case[1]:

      “There the reason for demise was quickly ascertained ; the sufferer of this daring outrage had been stabbed to demise from ear to ear with an extended, sharp instrument, in form like an vintage stiletto, which […] was subsequently discovered below the cushions of the hansom. […]”

    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:

      There have been many wood chairs for the majority of his guests, and two wicker armchairs with pink material cushions for superior folks. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian golf equipment, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy ornament that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and tremendously cherished.

  2. One thing performing as a cushion, particularly to soak up a shock or impression.
    1. A pad on which gilders reduce gold leaf.
    2. A mass of steam ultimately of the cylinder of a steam engine to obtain the impression of the piston.
    3. (sports activities, billiards, snooker, pool) The lip round a desk in cue sports activities which absorbs a few of the impression of the billiard balls and bounces them again.
    4. The pillow utilized in making bone lace.
    5. An engraver’s pad.
    6. (historic) The rubber of {an electrical} machine.
    7. (historic) A pad supporting a girl’s hair.
  3. (figuratively) a adequate amount of an intangible object (like factors or minutes) to permit for a few of these factors, for instance, to be misplaced with out hurting one’s probabilities for efficiently finishing an goal.
    • 2011 November 3, Arindam Rej, “Fulham 4-1 Wisla Krakow”, in BBC Sport:

      Wisla made a brilliant begin to the second half and Fulham keeper Mark Schwarzer was twice referred to as into motion, first saving Gervasio Nunez’s deflected 20-yard effort after which smothering Gargula’s free-kick.
      However Fulham quickly had the cushion of a 3rd aim after extra excellent build-up play.

    1. (finance, countable, uncountable) Cash saved in reserve.
      • 2007, Belverd Needles, Marian Powers, Monetary Accounting: Media Enhanced (web page 826)
        Curiosity protection is vital as a result of it’s an indicator of how a lot cushion an organization has in making its curiosity funds.
      • 2013, Stijn Claessens, Kirsten Forbes, Worldwide Monetary Contagion (web page 85)
        If one of many banks has a big sufficient cushion of capital and a robust sufficient stability sheet, then it might not expertise a financial institution run, and the domino impact in panel A wouldn’t have occurred.
  4. (out of date) A riotous dance, previously frequent at weddings.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

See additionally[edit]

Verb[edit]

cushion (third-person singular easy current cushions, current participle cushioning, easy previous and previous participle cushioned)

  1. To furnish with cushions.
    to cushion a settee
  2. To seat or place on, or as on a cushion.
    • 1734, Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke, A Dissertation on Events
      What number of doughty monarchs, in later and extra well mannered ages, would have slept in cottages, and have labored in falls, as a substitute of inhabiting palaces, and being cushioned up in thrones, if this rule of presidency had continued in power ?
  3. To soak up or deaden the impression of.
    to cushion a blow
    • 1903, Edward Porritt, “Poynings’ Legislation”, The Unreformed Home of Commons Vol.II p.429 (CUP):
      the event of common curiosity in Parliament made it much less potential for the Privy Council in Dublin to cushion a invoice which the Commons had introduced to the Lord Lieutenant
  4. To hide or cowl up, as below a cushion.

Translations[edit]

The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

References[edit]


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