History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Publications/Wireless Weekly/Issues/1929 01 04

Hyperlink to Problem PDF[edit]

WorldRadioHistory.com’s scan of Australasian Radio World – Vol. 01 No. 04 – August 1936 has been utilised to create the partial content material for this web page and could be downloaded at this hyperlink to additional prolong the content material and allow additional textual content correction of this problem: ARW 1936 08

Typically, solely content material which is required for different articles on this Wikibook has been entered right here and textual content corrected. The fabric has been extensively used, inter alia, for compilation of biographical articles, radio membership articles and station articles.

Entrance Web page[edit]

Wi-fi Weekly 3d.

Incorporating “Radio in Australia & New Zealand”

VOL. 13, NO. 2 – FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1929

(Registered on the G.P.O., Sydney for transmission by publish as a newspaper).

Ray Allsop and Don. B. Knock Technical Editors

Featured articles: Director of 4QG on Church Broadcasts; Silhouette Competitors Footage; Lengthy Distance Land-Line Broadcasts By Ray Allsop

Cowl Picture: The Air Scout – A Merely Constructed All-Electrical Set – See Web page 15

Inside Entrance Cowl – Philips Lamps Advert[edit]

0
/)»
m h

P iA* t,TACIVO,JMIJST

I ES, the final stage is the place for a Philips
Energy Valve —a mighty “Miniwatt”
that makes use of little if any extra present than any
different economical Philips Tube.
Good copy is determined by a number of issues, however with-
out a valve in the long run socket able to dealing with the
present, it’s unimaginable to acquire REAL music. After all
ample grid and plate voltages should be used, however you’ll
discover all that info contained in the carton.
Six Volt .
4 Volt .
8605
C 603
. 13/6 8403
8405
8409
PH I LI
15/-
. . 20/
. . 15/-
M
“ MINI WATTS ”
[Advt. of Philips Lamps (Australasia) Ltd. (Radio Department). Head Office and Showrooms : Cnr. Clarence and Margaret Streets, Sydney, N.S.W. J
8R74

P.01 – Philips Radio Apparatus Ad[edit]

ourojFTg,*
2&S&+
“m
mm
2%
—A CREATION FROM PHILIPS LABORATORIES
Not of the current, however distinctly of to-morrow is the Philips Audio Trans-
former. Its options are as diversified as they’re distinctive.
(1) A pure silver major — non-corrosive.
(2) A nickel secondary. < (3) A particular alloy core —unimaginable to saturate even ivhen utilizing the most important of Energy Valves. (4) Compact—effectively compact. (5) Fully shielded. (6) Transforms ALL frequencies equally from 200 to 10,000 cycles. This transformer, used with the right “Minniwatts” (a Energy Tube for the final stage, after all), and a Philips Loudspeaker, provides you with music that lives once more in all its glory. 27/6 PHILIPS RADIO APPARATUS Advt. of Philips Lamps ( Australasia) Ltd. (Radio Dept.) Head Workplace and Showrooms : Nook Clarence and Margaret Streets , Sydney. N.S.W.] BRBB

P.02 – Harringtons Advert[edit]

The
PILOT REDI-BLOX
Development Models
It’s simple to make good-looking units of ALL TYPES by utilizing Redi-Blox
Models. They current a neat and orderly look, which can’t be
equalled by utilizing separate elements.
Redi-Blox eradicate virtually all drilling and mounting issues,
guarantee good insulation, and defend the very important elements from mud and
dampness.
5 Redi-Blox Models substitute 18 separate elements, and put off
over 26 of the connections which can be required ordinarily.
Redi-Blox are literally no costlier to make use of than the numerous separate
elements which they substitute.
Common R. F. Redi-Blox, No. 3Q5
All types of R.F. Circuits can be utilized with this
No. 305 R.F. Unit, using any battery or A.C-
valves. Redi-Blox could be mounted aspect by aspect,
with coils spaced Four to five inches aside, centre to
centre, with out inter-stage coupling. All con-
nections are made with bus bars, completely
soldered. C Bias could be provided for A.C. valves.
Plug-in Coil tuned by a .00035 mfd Condenser.
Molded Bakelite base protects the wiring from
mud and moisture.
v
UY-227 Detector, No. 308
No matter sort of circuit it’s, Redi-Blox will match
in. The No. 306 Unit has a 5-prong socket, and
particular wiring, in accordance with R.C.A. speci-
fications for the UY-22 7 Detector, working on
A.U. for the filament. These Models are specifically
fascinating in A.C. units, as a result of, by simplifying the
wiring, coupling results are lowered to such an
extent that good operation, free from hum, can
be obtained.
Transformer Redi-Blox, No. 302
Right here is the best A.F. Transformer that exper-
ience and talent can reproduce, constructed right into a Redi-
Blox Unit. Any Battery or A.C. Valves could be
used, for the wiring is designed to care for all
varieties.
NOTE. Any sort of a radio circuit could be made
up and wired with Redi-Blox in lower than half
the time required when separate elements are as-
sembled. Furthermore, the Redi-Blox technique is so
easy that errors in wiring and poor connec-
tions are virtually unimaginable. Full diagrams are
provided with every Redi-Blox Unit.
no
Goodwill constructed on Public
Confidence since 1889.
Retail Radio Division and Present-
rooms; 386 George Avenue, Sydney.
Wholesale Warehouse; 213 Clarence
Avenue, Sydney.
Additionally at Katoomba, Newcastle, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Hobart
Auckland (N.Z.), Wellington (N.Z.).
Construct the PILOT
5-valve A.C. Electrical
AIR SCOUT
(Described in This Problem)
Learn what the Technical Editor has to say
about this actually magnificent set on this problem.
It’s simple to construct, too—the Redi-Blox Models
be sure that, and likewise we’ll gladly give
you any help you could require. The
following is the listing of elements required:
1 Pilot No. 388 A.C. Filament
Transformer £2 12 6
2 No. 305 Pilot R.F. Redi-Blox,
at 16/6 every 1 13 0
1 No. 176 Set of three Coils 1 5 6
1 No. 306 Pilot UY-227 Detec-
tor Redi-Blox 0 16 6
2 No. 302 Pilot A.C. Redi-Blox,
with Transformers, at 46/
every 4 12 0
Three Pilot No. 1617 Var. Conden-
sers, .00035 MF, at 13/6
every 2 Zero 6
1 Pilot No. J 7 Midget Condenser,
.00025 MF Zero 5 6
I Pilot No. 350 Resistograd …. Zero Eight 6
1 Audio Choke Emmco or
AAV. A 0 17 6
1 Impel ia By Go 2 MF Con-
denser Zero 5 8
2 Imperia By Go 1 MF Con-
denser, at 4/ every Zero Eight 0
1 Pilot No. 959 A.C. Resistor C
bias Zero 5 9
1 Pilot No. 951 UX 171 Resistor
C bias Zero S 9
1 Emmco 400 ohm Potentiometer Zero Four 6
1 Pilot No. 68 .0005 MF Mounted
Condenser Zero 2 9
12 Terminals at 3d every Zero Three 0
1 Pilot 2 meg Gridleaks Zero 1 6
1 Pkt. Celatsite Hook-up Wire .029
Three UX-226 Radiotron A.C. Tubes,
at 17/6 every * 2 12 6
! UY-227 Radiotron A.C. Detec-
tor Tube 1 10 0
1 UX-1 7 1 Radiotron Energy Tube 0 19 0

P.03 – Wi-fi Weekly Banner[edit]

Wi-fi Weekly
Vol. 13, No. 2.
Friday, ■
January
4,
1929.
Incorporating Radio in Australia & Mew Zealand
Handle;
5 1 Citadel*
reagh St.,
Sydney.
’Telephones;
87148-9.
DID YOU KNOW THEM BY THEIR SILHOUETTES?
A —Miss Dulcie Blair.
B — Mr. Vincent Aspey.
C — Mr. John Mitchell.
D — Mr. Charles Lawrence.
E — Mr. Horace Keats.
G — Mr. Len Maurice.
I — Mr. Bryce Carter.
A
B
C
D
£
F
G
H
I
I
Profitable
Competitor
can be
Introduced
Subsequent Week
ALREADY tons of of entries within the Silhouette competitors have
been acquired, and plenty of extra are anticipated earlier than the publica-
tion of this web page.
Routinely with the looks of the images above,
the competitors closes, and entries can be opened. We hope to give you the chance
to announce the identify of the profitable competitor within the subsequent problem.
The novelty of the competitors has aroused a substantial amount of curiosity
and curiosity amongst listeners. The attribute profiles of the artists
broadcasting afford refined clues to identification. We hope to give you the chance
to conduct comparable competitions at a future date.
Ml pictures and silhouettes on this web page by Howard Harris
Studios, King Avenue.
F—Miss Peggy Dunbar.
H — Mr. Ewart Chappie.
J—Miss Mabel Batchelor,

P.04 – Between You and Me and the Microphone[edit]

BETWEEN YOU AND ME
AND THE MICROPHONE
Farewell, However Not—
j >FN, MOSCOW, indicators off with “Dosvee-
danyia,” which is nothing extra sinister
than goodbye in English.
Japs Study
f | HE Tokio broadcasting station devotes 25
per cent, of its time to economies, 40 per
cent, to academic topics, and 35 per cent,
to leisure. And the common Japanese
listener likes the association.
Even the Announcers!
| ‘NCLE BAS returned from a browsing holi-
day to obtain the congratulations of his
pals on the fantastic fish he had caught.
After all, Uncle Peter had executed the injury
in the course of the kids’s
session. The bream—it
was a bream —was
seven ft lengthy by
two ft vast by three
ft deep. At any fee,
we hope it was Uncle
Peter’s fancy, as a result of
from Mr. Basil Kirke’s
bumt-up look
we’re virtually tempted
to imagine that he
visited the incendiary
place whence most
fishermen derive their
yarns.
The Everlasting Rivers
rrtHERE was an argument at 2FC in regards to the
suitability of ladies’s voices for broad-
casting. “Males’s voices,” stated an skilled, “are
finest for broadcasting. Their phrases come out
extra sharply. Now, a girl’s voice is con-
tinuous.” For some motive or different Mr.
Chappie laughed. The skilled frowned.
“What I imply is {that a} girl’s voice
FLOWS!” he stated, to make his which means fairly
plain. “FLOWS!” exclaimed Mr. Keats.
“Good heavens, ladies’s voices don’t movement —
they cataract!”
Again to College
(JHARLES YOUNGSON, of the 2BL management
room, invited the workers to Christmas
cake. Which was past all reward. Uncle
Peter was referred to as away to conduct the child-
ren’s session, and went, slice of cake in hand.
Quickly the workers, drink-
ing “ginger” beer,
heard Uncle Peter’s
voice giving the birth-
day calls. “Now all
little girls and boys of
2BL have simply had
SUCH a beautiful
Christmas celebration. They
have been consuming
Christmas cake. So
now I’ll give
them a name.” Then he
went by the
names, ending up with
“and little Ray! Oh,
I’m so delighted to
give little Ray a name.
Have a great time, Ray.” Little Ray
introduced his dimension seven and a half footwear to
the ground, and seemed murderous. “When
does Uncle Peter come off the air?” he in-
quired. ‘“Half-past six,” they instructed him. “I’ll
wait,” stated Mr. Allsop. CURTAIN.
La Bon Bonn
r f HE widow of Heinrich Hertz, the German
pioneer in air wave analysis, is a radio
fan. Her house is in Bonn.

Nothing to Say
JtypSS STEPHANIE DESTE, who was heard
from 3LO in a recital of readings from
the Scriptures and classical poets on Sunday,
December 30, tells of 1 event the place she
was afraid she would lose her energy, of
speech from need of train. It was “When
she was taking part in at Dayton, Ohio (the place the
rubber tyres come from), and which is a metropolis
of deaf mutes. About 25,000 are employed in
the rubber works, and, while they’re ex-
cellent staff, they take slightly getting
used to. “I properly keep in mind my first go to to a
restaurant,” stated Miss Deste, “and the useless
silence, solely relieved by the chink of cut-
lery. I started to get terrified and to suppose
that my very own tongue would get out of order
by lack of train; so, taking all issues
into consideration, I used to be actually glad to
go away.”
Letting Mom Know
he was ..coming in to take the Sunday
morning session at 2BL Captain A. C.
Stevens alighted from the tram in Elizabeth
Avenue, and, as he did so, observed two little
boys of about 5 and 6 years of age additionally
get down from the identical tram and run to
the pavement the place every of them threw
up within the air a service pigeon. The an-
nouncer was intrigued, and stopped to have
a chat with the kids, who instructed him
that they lived within the Jap Suburbs and
all the time attended Sunday College within the metropolis.
Their mom was very anxious all the time about
their going into city alone, and for this
motive they all the time introduced with them these
pet service pigeons and launched them on
arrival within the metropolis, to “let nv tVr know all
was properly.”
Fie, Sir Knight!
ONE0 NE morning not way back an enthralling
voice requested for Mr. Knight Barnett on
a 2BL ’cellphone. He was there in a second,
“Whats up!” stated the voice, “is that Knight?”
“Beloved,” replied the depraved one, “it’s
Morn.” ” • 1
A.B.C.
r Turkish Authorities is utilizing loud
audio system to show the general public the brand new
alphabet, which in-
corporates Latin in-
stead of Arabic let-
ters. The Govern-
ment operates Radio
Stamboul, the one
station in Europe
transmitting Turkish
and different Oriental
music.
Here’s a little bit of .
wide-eyed verse from ;
the opposite aspect of the ]
world:— 1
Once I consider the wi-fi wave,
Of its flight by the good concave,
I marvel how New Zealand hears
The excitement of a bee in Algiers!
Effective Tuning
r RITING from Noumea M. Pierre Ver-
nier thanked 2BL for the “pleasure you
gave us by re-broadcasting Radio-Paris.
You simply realise how my pals and my-
self had been completely happy to listen to this voice speaking in
cur personal language from the motherland.”
Surprisingly sufficient, M. Vernier, in describing
his receiver, doesn’t point out the kind of
tuning dial he employs.
How’s That?
D ID Julius Caesar play cricket? To this
query 9 hundred and ninety-nine
individuals out of a
thousand would
reply positively in
the adverse. Nicely,
they’d be fairly
flawed. It might
sound unusual; however,
nonetheless, it’s a
undeniable fact that Julius
Caesar did play
cricket; and, additional,
he really performed in
Australia. This asser-
tion will, little question,
conjure up a imaginative and prescient of
Cassius, behind
stumps, taking a sly
. , shot at Caesar’s bails,
and Mark Antony, standing by, exclaiming:
“Ah, Cassius, it’s not meet
That you need to attempt to trick our Caesar so,
When he did have one toe inside his crease;
Alas, my countryman, it’s not cricket.”
However, no, ’twas not the Julius Caesar of
Historical Rome who donned the pads and
gloves, however knowledgeable Surrey cricketer of
the final century, who got here to Australia with
George Parr’s second English workforce, which
visited Australia within the yr 1864. This
fascinating file has simply been disclosed by
Mr. R. H. Campbell, who has develop into
well-known for his talks or> cricket, and his
outstanding crickjiT Statistics broadca ~ om
3LO.
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
We want for you,
With by no means a care
To make you blue,
Could Good Fortune take
Your hand and, say,
“Pm sending the most effective
Round your approach.’’’
Could no one come
To make a din,
When quiet you sit
And LISTEN-IN.
Let 3LO assist
To make you brilliant;
There’s one thing to listen to
On each evening.
So tune within the set;
For all folks know
There’s loads to listen to
From 3LO.
And that is the want
We gaily name, *
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
To every one.
Sonia Hardie.

P.05 – Spiritual Broadcasting[edit]

RELIGIOUS BROADCASTING By J. W. ROBINSON. The Director of the Queensland Radio Service (4QG) on this article outlines the assorted strategies of rendering spiritual programmes adopted all through the world.

In view of the dialogue which arose in New South Wales lately concerning a reported, and possibly unfounded, suggestion that the stations ought to organize their very own companies and broadcast them from their studios, it’s of curiosity to notice the completely different methods adopted in varied elements of the world in regard to the broadcasting of non secular companies. In some elements of America the place the stations are owned by firms and the place no license charges are paid by listeners it’s a widespread observe for varied spiritual organisations to rent sure stations for intervals and to broadcast their companies, primarily for propaganda functions. Some of the notable spiritual broadcasts of this description was carried out a couple of months in the past by the Worldwide Bible College students’ Affiliation, which took over for one evening the entire chain of stations owned and operated by the Nationwide Broadcasting Firm and linked them collectively by way of land strains, so {that a} simultaneous broadcast of a service is likely to be effected. The president of the affiliation (Decide Rutherford) preached the sermon, and the I.B.S.A. claimed that their preparations had been accountable for the best simultaneous broadcast in historical past. The affiliation didn’t solely hyperlink up one thing like forty-seven large stations all through America, however it additionally employed a number of highly effective short-wave stations and cabled particulars concerning wave lengths and instances of transmission to its representatives in varied elements of the world. The representatives of the Worldwide Bible College students’ Affiliation in Australia acquired this detailed info and handed it on to the Australian broadcasting stations with the request that an try be made to relay the service. The scheme was undoubtedly an bold one, and, in keeping with studies acquired by mail from America, profitable. It excited a great deal of remark in some church circles in Australia on the time, and there have been many individuals who requested why, if an affiliation in America might organize such a broadcast, was not any person in authority within the Church of England conscious sufficient to make preparations for an Empire relay of a sermon by the Archbishop of Canterbury. All spiritual companies broadcast in America usually are not, nevertheless, organized by the church buildings or actions which rent the stations. A variety of church buildings are linked up by land line with broadcasting stations within the unusual approach, and their companies relayed.

THE RADIO VICAR. There may be, nevertheless, a system in vogue in some elements of america which is of appreciable curiosity. It includes the appointment by some massive station of a priest who’s termed a “Radio Vicar.” This gentleman arranges all of the spiritual broadcasts for the actual station he serves, and, after all, conducts most of these companies. Naturally the broadcasting station, being the direct employer of this clergyman, takes explicit pains to see that his {qualifications} are of a really excessive order, and that he’s, each mentally and by voice, an acceptable particular person to conduct broadcast companies. This method, nevertheless, whereas very fascinating, isn’t one which provides a substantial amount of selection to listeners. A number of the bigger stations which have appointed a “Radio Vicar” have, nevertheless, taken very nice pains to see that the kind of service he broadcasts is one which can swimsuit all tastes. No explicit creed or denomination is catered for, however the companies broadcast are easy Christian devotions with none creed or dogma being combined with them. It’s fascinating to notice that there are lots of individuals in America who strongly advocate any such spiritual broadcast. Many considering spiritual leaders have expressed the opinion that such a system has enabled radio to do in two or three years what the assorted sections of the Church have been unable to do in lots of centuries — bind all of the individuals of the nation collectively in easy Christian worship.

METHODS IN ENGLAND. In England strategies adopted for broadcasting differ. The British Broadcasting Company relays from completely different church buildings, however its officers appear to be guided within the alternative of their church buildings for the flexibility of various ministers to cater for a radio viewers. The official organ of the British Broadcasting Company has not contained any particular assertion of coverage in regard to spiritual broadcasting recently, however a research of the programmes set out in it signifies that whereas number of service is given, choice can also be given to ministers who give the most effective kinds of companies. One of many largest broadcasting stations operated by the British Broadcasting Company broadcasts virtually every Sunday from one massive church, and the minister answerable for that church is known as a “Radio Vicar.” It’s vital, nevertheless, that each one references to him within the British Broadcasting Company’s official organ positioned his title in inverted commas, apparently a sign that his title is an American adoption reasonably than a particular title bestowed by the British Broadcasting Company.

WHAT AUSTRALIA DOES. In Australia, as in different elements of the world varied methods have been adopted since broadcasting first commenced. With a restricted variety of “A” class stations, none of which is offered for hiring functions, there has not, after all, been any letting-out of the stations to any explicit part for the broadcasting of companies purely for propaganda functions. Quite a few “B” class stations function inside the Commonwealth, nevertheless, and a few of these have been utilised by spiritual organisations. Considered one of them was, in actual fact, erected and operated by a non secular physique, however even on this case nearly all of the transmissions had been of basic reasonably than of a non secular nature. Many of the “A” grade stations have broadcast the most effective church companies out there, and have proven the strictest impartiality of their alternative. Australian stations are (except for 4QG) owned by firms, which, after all, direct their very own affairs, and have subsequently broadcast church buildings the companies of which meet with their approval. It must be clearly understood that this doesn’t imply that stations have broadcast church buildings the creeds of which meet with their approval, however the companies of which had been of a excessive sufficient customary, and had been carried out in such a fashion as to outcome within the stations having the ability to please their listeners. A look by a file of any wi-fi journal in Australia is ample to point out that the actions of the managements of all stations in the course of the previous few years have been resembling to provide the general public a variety of selection in church companies, and likewise {that a} particularly reasonable apportionment of companies has been given to numerous church buildings.

QUEENSLAND SYSTEM. In Queensland a system for the allotment of church companies has been in pressure for 2 or three years, and could be very rigidly adhered to. The census figures for the State are taken, and from the part coping with faith the chances of the assorted denominations are rigorously labored out. These figures present that the religions of Queensland are made up as comply with:— Church of England, 41 per cent.; Roman Catholic, 24 per cent.; Presbyterian, 13 per cent.; Methodist, 11 per cent.; Congregational, 1 per cent.; Baptist, 2 per cent.; others, Eight per cent. Church service broadcasts are organized strictly when it comes to these percentages. A
church service schedule is deliberate out as soon as per yr, and companies are allotted varied denominations in amount in keeping with the
percentages proven within the census figures. Which means that for each fifty Sundays the Church of England receives twenty-one (21)
morning and night broadcasts, the Roman Catholic Church twelve (12) broadcasts, and so forth. One Roman Catholic Church is linked up with 4QG, and the authorities of that Church, realizing when their companies can be broadcast, make their very own particular preparations and their alternative of preachers. 4 Church buildings of England and the primary Cathedral are joined by land line. One Presbyterian Church — the most important within the metropolis — is wired up, and the dates for Presbyterian broadcasting are given to that church. The Presbyterian Church of Queensland then makes its personal preparations for the availability of broadcasting companies. One Methodist church is linked up, and the Methodist Church is suggested of the dates on which the station will broadcast. The station doesn’t, after all, act arbitrarily within the allotment of dates. The schedule is ready properly forward, and allotments are made, so far as attainable, to swimsuit the comfort of the ministers involved. The impact of such an association is clear. All sections are catered for in true proportion, in keeping with their spiritual beliefs, and the church buildings themselves have the chance of broadcasting positioned in their very own arms to profit from. Take, as an illustration, the Presbyterian Church, St. Andrew’s, in Creek Avenue, Brisbane, is linked by land line, the entire price
of which is borne by 4QG. The Presbyterian Church of Queensland is then allotted 13 per cent. of the broadcasting dates for a yr
(this determine being the proportion of Presbyterians in Queensland), and makes its personal preparations for the availability of companies.
It is aware of a yr forward when it is going to be broadcast, and if particular visits of distinguished Presbyterian ministers are thought-about, they could
be deliberate in order to happen at a time when a broadcasting date for Presbyterianism falls due. The one disadvantage to such a scheme is that some individuals declare that, from a listener’s perspective, a easy, non-episcopalian service makes higher broadcasting than a
Church of England service, and that on a share foundation the previous companies are smaller in quantity than the latter. This, nevertheless, is solely a matter of opinion, and the actual fact stays that the system is one which provides a completely honest allotment of companies and which provides the assorted Church buildings a golden alternative to offer of their easiest for the sake of the huge unseen congregation.

WHAT OF THE CHURCHES? A lot, nevertheless, for the perspective of the broadcasting stations to the Church buildings. What now of the perspective and actions of the Church buildings in regard to broadcasting? One of many predominant causes quoted in help of the alleged desirability of a brand new system in New South Wales was that complaints had been acquired from listeners in regard to the usual of church companies positioned on the air, and that in an effort to be sure that listeners obtain of the most effective, it was thought-about higher for the broadcasting station to take absolutely the management of the arranging of companies. Those that have listened rigorously over a interval of some years should, sadly, realise that there’s a large amount of reality on this rivalry. It’s fairly true that numerous clergymen and ministers have failed to grasp that the presence of a microphone of their church buildings has offered them with a possibility for reaching and influencing for the Glory of God a far larger variety of individuals in a single evening than they might hope to succeed in ordinarily in a life-time. It’s true that many ministers have realised this to be a reality, and have striven to make their broadcast companies one thing greater than an unusual devotion — have tried to make them specifically appropriate for broadcasting. Listeners in all elements of Australia have discovered to stay up for some companies (despite the fact that they don’t seem to be from church buildings through which they profess perception) purely as a result of the ministers involved have tried to rearrange their companies and sermons specifically for radio. These ministers have realised the worth of the motion to the Church, and have grasped the fantastic alternative which broadcasting has positioned of their arms. They’ve reaped the profit and the reward within the pleasure they’ve given listeners of all creeds. Others, whereas being anxious to broadcast, have, nevertheless, uncared for to grasp the truth that as soon as a microphone is positioned of their church throughout a service the partitions of the constructing now not act as its boundaries, however that the utmost ends of the earth are the factors which mark the extent of worshippers. It’s not so very way back since, at a synod assembly held in Australia, one minister tried to have a decision moved to the impact that probably the most solemn devotional portion of Church of England companies be deleted from the published stations. Luckily for many who regard the Sunday church service broadcasts as an necessary religious episode of the week, his decision
met with the destiny it deserved. The gentleman involved was likely fairly honest in his beliefs however he uncared for the truth that
there are millions of individuals who, by illness, previous age, and distance are unable to be current at divine service on Sundays, and to
whom broadcasting has come as a direct blessing from God. The deletion of probably the most sacred portion of a service from these individuals
would have ruined the entire impact of broadcasting them. There are numbers of church buildings the ministers of which regard broadcasting as most necessary, and co-operate very intently with their organists and choirmasters in order to offer particular music on broadcasting days, however there are others who don’t contemplate broadcasting necessary sufficient to acquaint their musical administrators of the dates, and so
try to provide their hearers one thing particular in the best way of music. Not too long ago one massive church in a capital metropolis was not prepared for broadcasting a service, and its minister suggested an engineer who inquired that the matter had been ignored. This regardless of the truth that he had had in his possession a often set out schedule months earlier than, and had written to the station involved accepting the dates allotted and stating that he was fairly ready to broadcast. Within the face of cases resembling these, it’s a matter for little wonderment that these controlling broadcasting stations are inclined to provide very critical consideration to the establishment of some scheme which can give their listeners a greater type of spiritual service. It might be argued that these controlling broadcasting might make a extra cautious choice and refuse to broadcast church buildings which didn’t make a particular effort on behalf of the unseen congregation. Such a rivalry is to a sure extent appropriate, however has the objection that it would result in favouritism. Moreover, the number of one or two finest ministers and the granting to them of all broadcasting isn’t very a lot completely different from the American system of every station appointing its “Radio Vicar.” Broadcasting stations are by no means free from criticism concerning the standard of their programmes, however it is a case through which the treatment (until it’s within the type of a studio-given service) doesn’t fully lie within the arms of the broadcasting officers. Numerous ministers have executed a lot to make the published service an amazing success, however a correspondingly massive quantity appear to have failed to grasp its worth and usefulness, and appear to have did not profit from their alternatives. Certainly the radio motion is so world-wide these days that these males ought to take extra discover of their radio work and perform a little higher for the general public.

(Begin Picture Caption) Mr. J. W. Robinson (Finish Picture Caption)[1]

Tags: John William Robinson, Wikibooks Robinson, Spiritual Broadcasting

P.06 – Aero Membership ‘Planes Check Radio in Flight[edit]

Aero Membership ‘Planes Check Radio in Flight
For the reason that set up of brief wave trans-
mitting and receiving gear within the
New South Wales Aero Membership pilot members
are exhibiting growing curiosity within the appa-
ratus and its prospects. Mr. S. V. Col-
ville, the engineer accountable, has left no
stone unturned, and his inter-plane tele-
phony checks have been extremely profitable. The
floor station VK2FA has been in a position to
preserve two-way telephony conversations
with the Avro Avian VK2FB. That is prob-
ably the primary use of wi-fi telephony as
utilized to aviation in Australia. A check
which can be of nice curiosity to Australian
experimenters was tried on Friday, December
28. A flight of machines left Mascot aero-
drome at 6 a.m. They handed over and
landed at Newcastle, Coffs Harbor, and Bal-
lina, arriving at Ballina at 5.30 p.m. Tele-
phony was tried with some success be-
tween two of the machines all through the
flight, utilizing a wave size of 35 metres.

A POTENTIOMETER could also be cheaply and
simply constructed from a carpenter’s
lead pencil, by taking out the lead and
clamping it on to an acceptable mounting, with
a brass strip throughout every finish. Mount a
slider above the lead on two small brackets,
and the job is full.

IN WIRING up a valve receiver take care
that the wire from the grid of the valve
doesn’t run parallel with the plate lead, as
in any other case interplay will happen.

IT IS POSSIBLE to make use of a valve receiver
utilizing the drop of potential of the “A”
instead of the “B” battery with wonderful
outcomes. In different phrases, no “B” battery of
any description is required. Such a receiver
is named the Unidyne.

MAKE A NEW YEAR decision to all the time
maintain the connections in your receiver
clear and free from mud. Terminals not
nickelled are apt to get soiled and rusty.
They need to be cleaned incessantly.

THE USE of a potentiometer throughout the “A”
battery when utilizing a mushy gas-filled
valve significantly will increase the effectivity of the
receiver.

WHEN YOU HAVE discovered an extraordin-
arily great place in your crystal, rigorously
drop slightly beeswax or paraffin wax round
the catswhisker the place it makes contact with
the crystal. In observe this has stored a great
spot for months at a time.

NEVER SWITCH OFF the filament battery
till you may have dulled the filaments by
technique of the rheostat. Such observe con-
siderably shortens the lifetime of your valves.

Gilbert and Sullivan Favorite
MISS VIOLET JACKSON, the possessor of
a pure soprano voice of nice allure, and
who sings with wonderful intonation, expres-
sion, and enunciation, can be heard from
3AR on January 10. Miss Jackson has been
related with the Gilbert and Sullivan
Opera Firm for 3 years, and ap-
peared in the entire repertoire with James
Hay.
POPPY PLANT AND PEG PAGE are pro-
viding very acceptable vocal duets at
2BL. “Poppy Plant” hides the id of an
artist very well-known to radio followers, who
has made an exhaustive research of the micro-
cellphone, with the outcome her voice broadcasts
excellently, and he or she is coaching her associate
to amass the identical microphone “sense” — a
very essential adjunct to profitable air
work. Their songs are in lighter vein, and
strike an harmonious observe within the nightly
programme

P.07 – Well-known Land-line Broadcasts[edit]

Well-known Land-line Broadcasts
By RAY ALLSOP (Affiliate Technical Editor)
The huge quantity of element behind the long-distance land-line trans-
mission is seldom realised by the listener. On this article Mr. All-
sop, who has been accountable for many well-known broadcasts of this
nature, tells of the extraordinary quantity of forethought required.
FEW listeners, I’m certain, realise the
organisation behind a broadcasting
station and the quantity of element re-
quired to place a programme success-
totally on the air. Not solely is there the pro-
gramme organisation, however there’s additionally the
technical preparations, with which I’ll
deal solely on this article.
On Melbourne Cup day you turn in your
set, then hear a transparent description of the occasion
immediately from the course. Quite simple, isn’t
it? However do you ever attempt to think about how it’s
all being executed?
CUP DAY BROADCAST.
Let me take the case of the final Melbourne
Cup. Each “A” class station in Australia,
and I feel New Zealand, was linked up for
this nationwide occasion. To start with, a micro-
cellphone was put in on the Flemington course,
and related by land line .to 3LO’s 371
metre and 3ME’s 32 metre management room.
From there it was break up to 3AR, and a particular
land line offered by the P.M.G.’s Depart-
ment carried the published to SCL, Ade-
laide, and 2FC, 2ME, 28.5 metres, and 2BL.
On the Sydney terminal the road carrying the
broadcast was once more break up to feed 4QG, Bris-
bane. 6WF, Perth, acquired and relayed the
broadcast from the now well-known Sydney brief
wave station, 2ME, whereas 7ZL, Hobart, re-
layed 3ME, Melbourne, brief wave.
From these particulars you’ll get hold of some
concept of the organisation and the effectivity of
the P.M.G. phone engineers in offering
good strains that haven’t been particularly constructed
for broadcasting work
PENRITH SPEEDWAY.
The primary lengthy land broadcast in Australia
was carried out on Eight-hour Day in 1924,
when 2BL put over an outline of the
occasions on the Penrith Speedway, the gap
from Sydney being roughly 38 miles
The primary ail-station hyperlink, when Mr. Collins,
representing the Commonwealth Authorities,
made a speech in reference to the
launching of the Commonwealth mortgage in 1925
JENOLAN CAVES.
Now for some technical particulars on a couple of oi
2BL’s lengthy land line transmissions. The primary
was Jenolan Caves, from the place an entire
programme was transmitted. On the Caves
Home an influence amplifier was put in to
transmit the speech and music over the land
line of 170 miles to 2BL’s management room. Wires
had been run from the facility amplifier within the
Caves Home to the underground caverns,
the place a community of connections had been in-
stalled in order that an amplifier and microphone
might be related to the assorted factors in
the caves, from which Mr. Wiburd. the Caves
caretaker, was to provide an outline of the
varied formations.
Bedtime tales had been instructed from the underside
oi the Satan’s Coachhouse —an enormous cavern
that’s really large enough to take the G.P.O.
inside It. Later, a live performance w r as transmitted
from a cave named the Music Corridor—a cave
famous for its peculiar resonance.
KOSCIUSKO BROADCAST.
One other lengthy land-line transmission wms
carried out from Kosciusko, a distance of 350
miles from Sydney. On this transmission the
energy amplifier was situated Within the resort, and
related to the Sydney line, and the enter
aspect to a line which was run up the moun-
tain, about two miles to the snow line at
Dainers Hole.
Right here one other small amplifier and micro-
cellphone had been arrange on the snow, and at this
level below electrical spot lights Mr. Lamble,
director of the Vacationer Bureau, and Mr. Speet,
home supervisor, gave an outline of the sur-
rounding mountains and slightly instruction
on the snow sports activities—previous “Mike” almost froze
up that point.
COAL MINE.
Technically, a really fascinating transmission
was carried out from a coal mine at Ka-
toomba. An outline was given from the
skip whereas it was really descending the 1700
ft, and a live performance given by the Welsh
miners half a mile underground, a descrip-
tion of wall hewing by the mine supervisor,
and a cost of dynamite fired. From the
amplifier within the mine workplace, which was con-
nected by line to 2BL, a pair of wires had been
led to a pair of spring contacts, which, in,
flip, waved in opposition to a pair of brass rings
fitted to the aspect of a reel, containing 1700
ft of wire.
The within “finish of the wire was related
to the pair of rings, and the outer finish to a
miniature amplifier within the skip. Because the skip
descended it drew the wire off the reel, elec-
trical contact being stored by tne spring
contacts in opposition to the transferring brass ring, thence
to the amplifier on the mine head, the ampli-
fier within the skip being offered to raise the tiny
microphone currents over the 1700 ft of
wire to the facility amplifier.
The descent full, the operator ?n the
skip related the 2 wires to a different pair
that ran half a mile into the mine tunnel,
the place a “mike” had been beforehand put in.
There the entire circuit from the micro-
cellphone. half a mile below the bottom. 1700
ft up the shaft to the road, 68 miles to
Sydney, 2BL’s management room, 5 miles line
to the transmitter at Coogee, after which your
loud speaker or head telephones wherever you
had been.
G.P.S. REGATTAS.
Profitable descriptions of the G.P.S. re-
gattas have been achieved by utilizing a
small transmitter on the official boat follow-
ing the rages, picked up by a receiving set at
Gladesville, after which fed to the management room
of 2BL.
This transient description might offer you slightly
Thought of the main points behind —allow us to say the
loud speaker—not the scenes.
The duties of the programme division,
who strive very laborious to fulfill the general public demand,
and the announcers who, when on account of some
electrical failure of an outdoor live performance, have
to maintain the programme operating easily in
a way, in my view, are way more
arduous than all {the electrical} issues.
THE PROGRESS OF RADIO
Ist Week: “Oh. sure! We acquired the set the opposite day. It’s a Wungly Googla.
with six valves and a beautiful dial. Finest set available on the market. We’re having
some bother simply observe with the accumulator. It is a Seltzer—finest British
make—however we related up the flawed wires and the valves blew out. or some-
factor. Anyhow, the mechanic’s fixing it. He is from Wonk and Wonk—finest
wi-fi agency in Sydney, you realize.
Ist Month: “It is best to come out and listen to our wi-fi. I inform you, there’s
nothing prefer it in Sydney. So clear and distinct. We acquired a brand new speaker. Floods
the home. You see. in spite of everything, it is the speaker that counts. We acquired a brand new one
that registers the excessive notes in addition to the low notes with a beautiful readability
and constancy, and a richness of tone hitherto thought unimaginable. ‘Course, I do know
they are saying that about each loud-speaker, however ours is the products, all proper. Come
over to-night. We’re getting all of the A stations — JjQG. SCL, SLO, 2FC. 2BL. and
on good nights we get proper over to . . .”
Ist Quarter: “l say. what do you consider the programmes they’re operating
these days ? Good heavens! 1 might do it higher myself! Nothing however comedians
and lowbrow music. What I say is: Comedians and jazz could also be all proper for
SOME individuals, however they need to contemplate how many individuals there are ivho actually
leant one thing good. What they need to put over is one thing instructive —
one thing that can be uplifting to individuals. . . Nicely, sorry you have to go, previous
man. however I’ve acquired a variety of work to do myself. Why not come over to-nightf
There gained’t he a lot on the wi-fi —some opera firm. I feel. However James
Gag’ll he on a while, they usually’re giving the boxing from the Stadium. Ought
to he good. You’ll come!
Ist 12 months: “No; I am not taking a lot curiosity in wi-fi simply now. Besides
when there’s one thing good on. I just like the information and the market studies and the
fights and the cricket. And Jimmy Gag. when he’s on—by no means appears to be on
these days. There’s an excessive amount of speaking , I feel. Sure. younger Jimmy tunes in now.
. . . Oh. no—he would not just like the Kids’s Session. The spouse listens in to
that. Jimmy tikes the jazz items and the back-chat sketches. He hasn’t any
appreciation of the Increased Issues. I don’t know what these children are coming
to. When 1 was his age. .

P.08 – Programme Personalities[edit]

PROGRAMME
PERSONALITIES
A Shy Contralto
Miss Nance Marley, whose not-
too-much-so contralto is changing into extra
and extra acquainted to 2FC and 2BL listeners-
in.
Miss Marley got here out from Newcastle-on-
Tyne 17 years in the past (when she was very, very,
very younger). She started to sing when she
was seven years previous, and has studied con-
tinuously since then. For the final three
years the Bennett-Norths have supervised.
Issues progressed quietly till the Goul-
burn, Kurri Kurri, and Ballarat Eisteddfods
championed her. Aged adjudicators threw
•laurel wreaths; and paragraphs discovered their
approach into the newspapers. Miss Marley was
a Discover. Miss Marley was a kind of individuals
of whom one would hear extra. Because the novel-
ists initially remarks, “THEN SUCCESS!”
Which, after all, could be very good and really
nice. We imply, should you had been to have
laurel wreaths thrust upon you, and en-
thusiastic paragraphs printed about you,
you’d naturally really feel happy, and also you
wouldn’t thoughts
inform ing individuals
about it, would
you? Nicely, Miss
Marley is shy.
And maybe a
little nervous.
At any fee, we
managed to seek out
out that her
best relaxa-
tion is cooking.
“However, after all,
you may’t put
that in,” she
stated. She likes
the live performance plat-
type higher than
the lonely mic-
rophone, , be-
trigger “I wish to
see the expres-
MISS NANCE MARLEY
sions on individuals’s faces.” Within the circum-
stances, that is reasonably a great oblique com-
pliment to her singing. And Miss Marley
can sing solely operatic, live performance, and critical
music.
But nonetheless waters have a behavior of operating
deep; and the shy individuals of this world gen-
erally have one thing to be shy about. So
we imagine that, as Mrs. Bennett-North instructed
us, Miss Marley has intense dramatic in-
stinct, and the facility of placing persona
into all her renderings.
Moreover, Miss Marley has solely simply begun
her profession. We will have the ability to choose a lot
higher afterward.
Musical Comedy Tenor
HERBERT BROWNE, whose high-quality tenor
voice is delighting tons of of individuals
nightly within the profitable musical play, “The
Desert Music,” has renewed his acquaintance
with Victorian listeners, and was heard
from 3AR on December 30. Many individuals
who take pleasure in his inventive work usually are not conscious
that he’s a totally certified engineer, and
commenced life with the thought of devoting his
energies to this career; and it was not
till he sang at a live performance on the voyage
from England to Australia that he thought-about
the thought of taking on music severely. Since
that point he has made outstanding strides;
he has been related to Marie Burke in
main elements in varied musical comedies.
Gifted Pianist
ROBINSON, a gifted younger
pianist, who’s once more in Sydney, has spent
5 years overseas furthering her research. She
was on the Royal School of Music, London,
the place she secured her A.R.C.M. diploma. She
fulfilled many live performance engagements in Lon-
don, and studied with Tobias Matthay. Later
Miss Robinson went to Vienna, the place she
was a pupil of the good trainer, Smil Sauer,
who himself was a pupil of Liszt. ‘ Earlier than
returning to Sydney she gave a recital in
London, which was very favorably criticised
by “The Occasions” and different necessary papers.
Miss Robinson has broadcast by on 2FC
on varied events, and within the new yr
additional studio appearances, it’s hoped, will
be organized.
Thanhs to Annie Laurie
-HERE is Miss Peggy Dunbar, whose deli-
cate contralto voice has been broadcast
from 2FC for the previous two and a half years
with wonderful outcomes. “Individuals I’ve by no means
seen earlier than have written to me, and given me
engagements to sing,” she stated, “and I’ve
had many outdoors engagements merely
by broadcasting.”
Miss Dunbar started broadcasting on the
programme of “a tearoom over the street,”
and ultimately was given an audition by Mr.
Anderson. “I
sang ‘Annie Lau-
rie,’ ” she stated,
and chuckled.
/‘Have been you ner-
vous?” we in-
quired. “Oh, no,”
she replied, “I
was simply think-
ing how a lot I
should thank
‘Annie Laurie’
for. A number of years
in the past I wouldn’t
have thought it
attainable.
“After all,”
she remarked,
apropos of noth-
ing in particu-
MISS PEGGY DUNBAR.
lar, “we’re actually Scotch; however we
have been right here a few years.” We cleared
our throats, and stated: “It’s essential to have
been fairly a toddler if you got here out, Miss
Dunbar.” We flatter ourselves that we have now
the MANNER. She laughed. “Sure; I’ve
spent a great deal of time right here at college,”
she confessed. (“Confessed” is an admirable
v/ord.)
Miss Dunbar spends her spare time taking part in
tennis and swimming. And as she is at house
in the course of the day she does slightly house responsibilities,
too. And she or he research very laborious, and prac-
tises often, and sings solely traditional songs,
and needs to maintain on singing them.
A pupil of Madame Emily Marks, Miss
Dunbar has gained many successes at con-
certs, and with the Goulburn Choral and
Operatic Society.
Mr. C. J. O’Connor, well-
recognized announcer at 3LO and
3AR, and fashionable kids’s
story-teller, below the identify of
“Plain Peter.”
Mr. Gerald Watenn, the
well-known Conservatorium
violinist. (See interview be-
low.)
A Distinguist Violinist
managed to nook Gerald Walenn in
the hall outdoors 2BL’s studio. “An
interview?” he stated. “Nicely, now; what can I
inform you?” “All the pieces,” we steered. Mr,
Walenn sat down on a ricketty chair simply
outdoors the management room. His story ran
thus sensible:—-
Gerald Walenn was born in London. He
studied on the Royal Academy of Music
below M. Sainton, and later below Emile
Sauret, among the many best masters of the
violin of their time. He remembers with nice
pleasure a command to look earlier than Queen
Victoria whereas he was in his teenagers. He was
afterwards offered to Her Majesty, who
talked about in the midst of her dialog
that the Mendelssohn Concerto he had simply
performed was considered one of her favourite items of
music. Her Majesty recalled that Mendels-
sohn himself, with M. Sainton, had performed it
for her.
Mr. Walenn has toured significantly—many
instances by the British Isles, and thru
France and Germany. He made a .extended
tour of america and Canada, and
was virtually persuaded to remain there; however “I
was too keen on the Previous Nation,” he stated.
For ten years he was chief of the well-known
Walenn String Quartet, which he organised
together with his brother Herbert, the well-known
’cellist. When the Nice Battle started the
quartet was disbanded. “Is that sufficient?”
requested Mr. Walenn. “Why. you haven’t ar-
rived in Australia but!” we exclaimed. “Very
weil,” he stated, “I’ll inform you about that.”
In 1917 he got here out to the Elder Con-
servatorium, Adelaide, to be principal violin
trainer on the workers, to guide the quartet, and
to provide periodical recitals. A few of his hap-
piest recollections of Adelaide are of his two
look with Henri Verbrugghen’s visiting
New South Wales State Conservatorium Or-
chestra. Then in 1923 the director of the
Sydney Conservatorium, Mr. (now Dr.) Arun-
del Orchard provided him an appointment to
train on the workers of the Conservatorium, and
to organise and lead the string quartet. The
invitation was acepted.
Mr. Walenn likes broadcasting. “There may be
a sure fascihation about it,” he says, “al-
although I felt reasonably uncomfortable at first
with out an viewers.” Talking of his work
he stated that he was lucky in having
many very proficient Australian college students. He
thinks very extremely of Mr. Vincent Aspey,
who, by the best way, gained the violin champion-
ship on the Radio Eisteddfod.
“Mrs. Walenn and I’ve made many good
pals in Sydney,” he concluded, “and these,
along with your fantastic local weather, make life in
Australia very completely happy for us.”
So we don’t suppose he desires to return.

P.09 – The New 12 months Present Three[edit]

THE New 12 months GIFT THREE It is by no means too late to make your folks a present, despite the fact that the Christmas season is ended. Right here is an easily-built and cheap reward which you may make in a couple of hours. Little or no bother, and no costly elements concerned in building. By DON B. KNOCK (Affiliate Technical Editor).

I’ve been pleasantly shocked on the massive quantity of people that have been considering wi-fi receivers as presents for his or her household or pals. All the time it has been the identical concept. One thing not too costly, simple to make, and which can give good high quality copy of native broadcasting stations with a glance in on 3LO often. What might be a extra pleasing reward than a neat little wi-fi set? Virtually each wi-fi fanatic can have elements of all descriptions mendacity about in his sanctum; and with slightly software, a couple of coils, transformers, and so forth., it’s a straightforward matter to knock collectively a very environment friendly three-valve receiver. That’s all proper — the making of the set — however to make a set for a gift, and to provide it to the recipient minus a cupboard of some sort savours considerably of disappointment. On this transient article you will notice illustrated a neat little set which I’ve named THE NEW YEAR GIFT THREE. It originated from the identical concept which should be uppermost at this time within the minds of a large number of individuals — a seasonable current.

One of the best ways to go in regards to the proposition is to acquire a cupboard first, then construct the set. A glance across the wi-fi sellers will deliver to mild sundry cupboards awaiting disposal at a ridiculously low-cost worth, in comparison with the costs initially requested for them in earlier days. They might be marked and scratched, with maybe slightly piece chipped off right here and there, however what’s the matter with the varnish brush and the French polish? In a few hours one could make a shabby-looking cupboard a glistening piece of furnishings! The cupboard housing the New 12 months Present Three must be recognised by many. It as soon as contained an previous Gecophone two-valve receiver. They did good work within the early days, however, in widespread with many different pioneer units, have been outdated by extra trendy varieties. The cupboard is without doubt one of the most engaging in look one might presumably want for. Not too long ago the British Basic Electrical Firm, Ltd., had a couple of of those “previous timers” for disposal very cheaply and, with a watch to the long run, I used to be to be seen wending my homeward approach with this cupboard, plus a bottle of polish. The innards of the previous set had been eliminated till the cupboard stood alone prepared for modernising.

I ponder what number of realise that an previous variometer can nonetheless be made good use of in as of late of astaticism in coils and the like? It so occurred that the previous receiver had a variometer within the aerial circuit and it’s a certainty that there should be a variety of these as soon as proud elements mendacity round within the wi-fi rooms of numerous “followers.” The primary contemplation was the great previous Reinartz, till I noticed the variometer. Then I made a decision to let the variometer enter upon a brand new function by tuning the stator the identical as another coil with a .0005 mfd SLF variable condenser and letting the rotor do responsibility as a suggestions “inducer.” The circuit diagram reveals what occurred to it. A tapping was made someplace in regards to the centre of the stator for an aerial connection, thus giving a good diploma of selectivity. The stator and rotor had been left related in collection and the mid level between the 2 used for filament return, rotor of tuning condenser, and earth connection. The outer finish of the rotor was related by a .0003 fastened stopper condenser to the plate of the detector, and right here was the nucleus of a superbly good oscillator to cowl the published band of wave-lengths!

The peak of the cupboard allowed the insertion of a baseboard excessive sufficient to allow the B and C batteries to slip beneath, making the ultimate set very compact. It was no use spoiling the ship for the tar, so good audio transformers had been used. These had been an
A.W.A. Superb within the first stage and a Philips within the second. A.W.A. anti-vibration valve sockets had been used, and six-sixty valves all through. Utilized in any Reinartz sort receiver, one might all the time rely on the most effective of efficiency from these wonderful British valves, with excessive economic system in battery consumption. These used within the New 12 months Present Three are S.S. 6075 H.F. (detector), S.S. 610P. (1st audio), S.S. 610P. (2nd audio). These are all six-volt valves so the set is used with a six-volt accumulator.

A 20 ohm. rheostat controls the filament voltage on the detector. The adverse bias on the primary audio is 4½ volts and 9 on the second. Any good variable condenser could also be used, the one within the authentic is an Igranic-Pacent .0005 S.L.F., used with a Pilot Artwork dial. I’ve given a drilling diagram with this text, however this may solely be of use to those that might have one of many identical cupboards out there. The knob on the left of the tuning dial controls the rotor of the variometer, and the knob beneath this, on the base of the panel, the 20 ohm. rheostat. Subsequent in line are the one circuit jack for the output and the battery swap. A .0001 Wetless fastened condenser in collection with the aerial lead will assist the selectivity alongside significantly, though, by connecting the aerial on to the centre faucet of the grid coil (the previous variometer stator) the selectivity is ample for regular use. The .0001 fastened condenser was discovered important in testing the set in my very own location, on account of the truth that I can see 2BL’s aerial “over the fence.” C2 within the circuit diagram is the same old .00025 grid condenser and a couple of megohm Mullard leak. When testing the set, give the detector 50 volts on the plate and the audios 90 to 100 volts. Response is managed by the rotating coil in precisely the identical approach you’d tune a Reinartz with a variable condenser. All native stations will romp in at full loud-speaker quantity, and 3LO and 3AR are sometimes heard with good quantity.

The New 12 months Present Three is simple to make and use. It’s the best little current, and, should you don’t imagine me, give her one like this and watch her smile in gratitude![2]

P.10 – Some Brisbane Bedtime Individuals[edit]

SOME BRISBANE BEDTIME PEOPLE
The Sandman and Percy
r pHE first bedtime tales instructed from 4QG
had been delivered by the director (Mr. J. W.
Robinson) below the title of “The Sand-
man.” One night Mr. Robipson, in answer-
ing a letter from slightly listener, stated that if
he might discover anybody who might play a mouth
organ he would supply a couple of minutes’ music
from that insignificant however extraordinarily fashionable
instrument. Listening in that evening was Mr.
James Tyson, who had performed the mouth
organ since he was 5 years previous. At 9
o clock subsequent morning Mr. Tyson was in Mr.
Robinson’s workplace, and he was appointed as
the brand new Sandman on October 21, 1925. To-
day the Sandman at 4QG is understood by little
listeners all through Australia and New Zea-
land. He has launched imaginary journeys by
radio and varied musical devices, and
to-day he performs 25 completely different novelty instru-
ments, and may imitate 32 completely different birds and
animals.
Wanting spherical for an additional novelty Mr
Tyson found he possessed powers of ven-
triloquism, and forthwith launched “Percy,
who now vies for first place with “Sandy” in
the hearts of the kiddies and grown-ups
alike. The Sandman and Percy as much as Oc-
tober, 1928, acquired from radio admirers
one thing between 5000 and 7000 letters. Mr.
Tyson is r ‘”‘” l v morning information announcer at
4QG, and official Speedway an-
nouncer at Davies Park throughout
Saturday evening broadcasts.
“Little Miss Brisbane” ‘
“Bebe,” and “Bunty”
yiTH a view to giying selection
even in bedtime tales it
was determined within the early days
of 4QG’s existence to allot cer-
tain evenings to completely different bedtime
story tellers. The Sandman
was given Mondays, Thursdays,
and Fridays, and the following ap-
pointment was that of “Little
Miss Brisbane,” along with her two as-
sociates, “Bebe” and “Bunty,” on Wednes-
day nights. “Little Miss Brisbane” in non-public
life is Miss Mavis McFarlane, secretary to the
director of 4QG. “Bebe” is Mrs. Hilda Wool-
mer, official accompanist at 4QG; whereas
“Bunty” is Miss Margaret (Peg.) McFarlane.
Little Miss Brisbane’s” sister.
Striving all the time to offer a quiet and dig-
nified half-hour on a Wednesday night this
mixture appears to exert endless
vitality to show a drawing-room environment
all through.
Considered one of “Little Miss Brisbane’s” accomp-
lishments is brief story writing, and it’s
The
Sandman
and
Percy.
“Bede,” “Little Miss Brisbane ,” and
“Bunty .”
of •«,>*-
gano : “Bunty mandolin; and “Little Miss
sctecttoS, “’ usually^SoZZief’’“utt’e
Miss Brisbane’s” candy contralto voice.

P.11 – Within the Air and On the Air[edit]

In THE AIR and ON THE AIR
2FC and 2BL
Of No Significance
AN Wednesday, January 16, the H. W.
f Varna Firm will produce “The
Girl of No Significance” at 2BL Studios.
The collection of performs Mr. Varna has lowered to
tabloid type, so eminently suited to broad-
casting, proceed to seek out favor with listeners
who take pleasure in “the spoken phrase” on the air.
Thriller Tales
pAPTAIN FRED AARONS has been con-
ducting a collection of talks by 2BL
service, and to “spherical them off,” as he ex-
Capt. Fred. Aarons.
pressed it, he has in-
troduced a completely
new observe, which is in-
triguing his many lis-
teners. “Thriller”
tales quicken the
creativeness, however the
one he has chosen for
the afternoon on
January 14 “The
Home Slide” —will, we
belief, not show as
mentally devastating
as its identify. Fairly a
departure from the
ordinary routine of talks, these yarns, with
their ‘‘guess-what-it-is” ending, are holding
the curiosity of various listeners, because the
many letters the captain has acquired will
vouch.
Cowley and Maxwell
J?DITH COWLEY AND lAN MAXWELL are
once more in Sydney after an in depth and
profitable tour, and an look has been
organized for them on Thursday evening,
January 17, at 2BL. Gentle fashionable songs and
brisk dialogue present a satisfying act, which
can be welcomed by listeners.
Second Basic Night time
r PHE “CLASSIC NIGHT” SERIES at 2FC
1 are proving the rivalry initially put
ahead that “previous” and “new” music ought to
not be permitted to intermingle—for many of
the alleged music which comes below the
complete time period “trendy” can not lay
simply declare to the title. The programme on
Wednesday evening, January 16, has been ar-
ranged by Horace Keats.
Vibrant Songs
“A T E MERRIE TRIO” is a brand new mixture
1 showing at 2BL; brilliant songs, good
novelty piano work, and violin solos of the
fashionable sort present a diverting half-hour
for listeners preferring any such enter-
tainment, and the programme for Friday
proper, January 18, is stuffed with glowing num-
bers.
Manly Band
AN SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, the Manly
Band can be on the air by 2BL be-
tween 3.30 and 5.Zero within the afternoon, and be-
tween 8.30 and 9.30 within the night. Regardless of
the continuous demand for one thing new and
novel—which isn’t confined solely to broad-
casting on this stressed section on the earth’s
existence —actually good band music has misplaced
none of its reputation, and the Manly Band,
rating, because it does, among the many main in-
strumental combos of Sydney, offers
a universally acceptable leisure. Mr.
J. Pheloung, the conductor, is an ardent
radio fanatic, and boasts a flattering fol-
lowing “on the air.”
Pacific Downside
J7ROM THE LYCEUM on Sunday after-
midday, January 13, Rev. J. W. Burton,
M.A., will communicate on “Australia’s Native Prob-
lem within the Pacific.” His handle offers with
missionary actions, and may show of in-
terest to many 2FC listeners. A musical
programme can be offered by Eleanor
Stanton, Lotys Lescaut, and the “Brunette
Trio!”
Hospital Live performance
r rHE 2FC HOSPITAL CONCERT PARTY is
going far afield on Saturday evening,
January 19. Nepean District Hospital is its
vacation spot, and listeners might anticipate a
jolly programme. Charles Lawrence is, as
ordinary, grasp of ceremonies, and he has with
him Leslie Austin, Dorothy Dewar, R. A.
Bartleman, Peggy Dunbar, and Carlton Fay.
The live performance can be broadcast between 8.0
and 9.30 p.m.
Y.M.C.A. Debate
7 PILE Y.M.C.A. “A”(DEBATING TEAM is
coming to 2BL on Monday evening, January
14, to take pleasure in constructive argument. The
topic has not but been positively determined
upon, however a matter of present curiosity can be
chosen, and within the succesful arms of Messrs.
R. Kidson, A. Simpson, and George Snow
(.affirmative), and Messrs. R. Chappie, L.
Starke, and D. M’Leod (adverse), the in-
terest of listeners can be well-sustained.
Warde Morgan
ALTHOUGH he has many calls on his time
Warde Morgan usually manages to
sandwich in between his actions slightly
broadcasting, and on Sunday night,
January 13, he’s collaborating with Daisy
Richards in a novel music recital —distinctive,
inasmuch because the numbers have by no means been
executed on the air earlier than. Miss Richards is
veil recognized each to 2FC listeners and Sydney
concert-goers, and the programme, which has
resulted from a lot cautious thought and
planning, ought to provide lovers of inventive work
a musical deal with. Kathleen Roe, who’s play-
ing the accompaniments, may even embrace
pianoforte solos.
3LO and 3AR
A “ Century” at 3LO
FREDERICK CHAPMAN, who has
given a number of collection of talks from 3LO,
Mr. F. Chapman.
will ship his hund-
redth speak on January
12, 1929. He made his
bow earlier than the micro-
cellphone on November
29, 1924, and since
that day has lined
a large space, mainly
from a geological
standpoint, discussing
at size the forma-
tion of varied rocks
and fossils. The hund-
crimson talks which have
been given over the air are of explicit
curiosity to naturalists, and any listener de-
siring a repetition has merely to ship in a
request.
“Breaking the Ice”
LISTENERS who take pleasure in a brilliant and witty
one-act play, crisp with repartee, ought to
not fail to tune into 3LO on Monday,
January 7, when Mrs. Maurice Dudley, as-
sisted by Charles Dyson, will current “Break-
ing • the Ice.” The wonderful work of those
two favourite artists are well-known.
Songs of the Air Power
•’THAT very high-quality baritone, J. Alexander
Browne, can be heard from 3LO on
January 10 in a recital of “Songs of the Air
Mr J A. Browne.
Power,” a cycle by Eric
Coates, two favourite
numbers being “Billy”
and “The Most interesting Job
of All.” Mr. Browne
has been earlier than the
public for a few years
now, has toured Aus-
tralia, New Zealand,
and Tasmania many
instances, and whether or not in
operatic choice, ora-
torio excerpt, or popu-
lar ballad, the identical
inventive end marks his work, and provides nice
pleasure to his audiences.
Common Baritone
D. FRASER, the favored younger bari-
? tone, can be broadcasting from 3LO on
January 12. As a member of the Essendon
Operatic Society he has performed main elements
in ‘“The Arcadians” and “Our Miss Gibbs,”
and was profitable within the Kyneton musical
competitions held two years in the past, when he
carried off the primary prize in each the tenor
and baritone sections.
Canoeing Time
SEASONABLE TALK can be given from
3AR on January 10 by Mr. E. A. Gollan,
director of the Y.W.C.A Canoe Membership, who
will communicate on “Canoeing as a Sport and Re-
creation,” and can give an outline of many
canoe journeys up the Yarra.
New Zealand ’Cellist at 3LO
JfRANK JOHNSTONE, the favored ’cellist
of the Strad Trio, can be heard in Pop-
per’s “Hungarian Rhapsody” on Sunday,
January 6, when his artistically rendered
solos will add significantly to the enjoyment
of a well-arranged programme. It will likely be re-
membered that Mr. Johnstone was one of many
best-known musicians in New Zealand, and
organised a novel orchestra composed of 25
’cellos, which gave many recitals in Wel-
lington.
File Broadcast
QN Sunday, January 6, a really high-quality pro-
gramme of the world’s finest data will
be broadcast from 3AR. The programme has
been organized to signify a grand live performance.
Orchestral alternatives can be given by Sir
Hamilton Harty and his Halle Orchestra, Sir
Henry Wooden and the Queen’s Corridor Orchestra,
and Felfk Weingartner with the Royal Phil-
harmonic Orchestra. Data of Ben Davies,
the distinguished English vocalist, can be in-
cluded within the programme, and the world-
well-known contralto, Dame Clara Butt, will sing
two favourite melodies, “The Rosary” and.
“Down by the Riverside I Stray.”

P.12 – Editorial[edit]

NEW LEAVES
Incorporating “Radio in Australia and New Zealand.”
FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1929.
THIS is the season of recent leaves.
The deciduation of final yr’s
folios, worn and serried with the
erasures of many damaged resolutions,
is full. We mark the date neatly
on the virgin sheet, and ponder over
the early hopes of the brand new yr.
Such meditation isn’t any much less nice
as a result of we all know that this sheet, too,
will in twelve months have borne many
erasures. Certainly, it’s this which lends
fascination to this new yr occupation
of creating resolutions; for it could be
a really uninteresting world if we pre-arranged
our lives on this approach. Thus our first
decision can be to not make a resolu-
tion which mayn’t be damaged.
However this doesn’t stop us from
making an attempt to pre-arrange the lives of
others—a secret busybody need we
share with the remainder of the world. It
affords an amazing satisfaction to write down
resolutions for different individuals of our
acquaintance—though, sadly,
we can not see how they are going to be stored.
For example, if we had been Mr. Charles
Lawrence, we’d resolve, firmly and
zealously, by no means to joke once more about
mothers-in-law.
Or if we had been within the footwear of the 2BL
Boxing Announcer we’d inscribe
our intention of accelerating our vocabu-
lary, and to take respiratory workout routines
on the earliest alternative.
If we had been Uncle Bas we’d
resolve to take a small travelling crane
with us subsequent time we went fishing, in
order to deliver house the catch.
If we had been any considered one of various
reverend gents who protested
vigorously within the press in opposition to the sup-
posed inauguration of the studio re-
ligious service, we’d resolve all the time
to verify of our information earlier than vent-
ing our opinion in public.
If our voice was that of a sure
soprano we all know, then we’d re-
resolve by no means to broadcast in any respect—or, if
this was too drastic, then no more
than every year.
The identical decision might be made
for various different “fashionable fea-
tures” with out severely limiting
programme expertise.
Once more, occupying the earthly determine
(!) of Mr. 11/P. Brown, our first reso-
lution can be by no means to confuse radio
with crimson tape.
■ However we can not properly refuse ,these
individuals the precise additionally to share our re-
answer by no means to make a decision
which mayn’t be damaged. We, there-
fore, count on every of these resolutions
we have now made for different individuals to be
damaged earlier than 1930 seems.
Instructional Programme Matter
AMONGST the helpful functions to which
broadcasting is being put nothing is
extra beneficial than that of educa-
tion. Though the first and,
maybe, predominant object in sustaining broad-
casting companies is to cater to the lighter de-
mands of the thoughts, leisure isn’t the
solely motive for offering programmes.
Somebody has stated that selection is the spice
of Radio; that entertaining and diverting
gadgets represent the spine of broadcast-
ing, and that each one the opposite gadgets are fill-ins
to finish the programme. That could be a bit
over-drawn, little question; however it can not de denied
that individuals firstly search to be entertained and
amused by the radio programmes.
Many gadgets even of leisure could be
instructive and educative; not all diversion is
to fulfill a passing temper or to go away a tran-
sient impression on the thoughts of the listener.
And, equally, something within the programmes
that pulls and holds the listener’s curiosity
will go away an impression. So we observe the
efforts of the broadcasting administrators to make
the programmes enticing, and along with
the key proportion of sunshine music to in-
clude a sufficiently satisfying ingredient of
extra strong and helpful matter. Not ample
to supply psychological dyspepsia, nevertheless. Too
a lot intellectual matter will unbalance the
programme, and upset the curiosity of the
listener. And it should be remembered that
academic or instructive matter will fail to
fulfill if it’s not fascinating. As in public
talking the rendition should rely on
method in addition to matter. Many high-quality lec-
tures, filled with useful and fascinating factors,
cnly partly reach inducing the desidera-
tum. aimed toward just because the lecturer did
not contemplate the all-important merchandise of at-
tracting and holding the curiosity pleasingly.
A lot of our stations have often included
matter of academic worth—lectures, talks,
travelogues, and so forth.; that’s not directly educa-
tional, as distinct from the direct companies for
faculties. These oblique or suggestive instruc-
tions are of extra worth than the peculiarly
applicable classes by radio for faculties. The
faculties these days are so full in curricu-
lum and high quality of academics, in addition to con-
venient in location for the overwhelming majority of
the inhabitants, that assistance from broadcasting
isn’t necessary. In any respect occasions, it’s not
pressing. It’s within the path of grownup and
adolescent schooling that broadcasting has
an pressing name to reply. The schooling
authorities haven’t been over anxious to
avail themselves of the alternatives of direct
faculty companies. Some three or 4 years in the past
3LO, Melbourne, endeavoured to enlist the
assist of the Schooling Division in estab-
lishing such a service, and provided the station
for college classes, however the provide was not
accepted.
Therefore it turned essential to pay attention
on the oblique schooling gadgets by lectures,
talks, and dissemination of knowledge of an
instructive character. Any examination of
the printed programmes will present that
best of service, along with the opposite
phases of broadcasting has been always
stored in thoughts, and plenty of expressions of ap-
preciation testify to the success of the ser-
vice

The Wi-fi Physician’s Prescriptions[edit]

GOOD “B” battery fuse could be made
from a torch bulb and socket. The bulb
must be related in collection with the “B”
adverse lead.

THE ORDINARY receiving crystal has a re-
sistance of roughly ten to forty
thousand ohms, and may subsequently be used
in radio receivers as fastened resistances. The
ohmage should first be discovered with a Wheat-
stone Bridge, particulars of which appeared
in “Radio.”

NOVEL FRAME aerial could also be made by
inserting 4 pegs in every of the
corners of a door, and winding the wire
spherical these. Because the door could be swung
by an arc of about 180 levels, this
permits the right directional adjustment of
the body aerial.

LEAVE YOUR RECEIVER alone when
thunder is about. A floor swap and
lightning arrestor in your aerial circuit is
properly price whereas. It might not solely save your
set, but in addition your home from destruction.

a gas-pipe earth. It’s exceedingly
harmful. The fireplace underwriters in-
clude this rule.

JNDUCTION from high-voltage energy strains
could also be minimised by operating a small
aerial close to to and parellel to the strains, and
inductively coupling it to the set. The cur-
lease induced within the circuit will oppose these
from the primary aerial. If appropriately executed,
the loss in sign power is negligible.

IJSE YOUR radio as a barometer. When
crackling and hissing of static is preva-
lent, you could count on dangerous climate. This
could also be noticed on crystal in addition to valve
units.
THE OPERATION of all crystal detectors is
based mostly on uni-directional or one-way
conductivity.. If the contact wire be touch-
ing an applicable spot on the floor of
the crystal, currents will cross in a single direc-
tion, way more simply than within the reverse
path. A buzzer is helpful to discover a good
spot on the crystal.

ONE END of the aerial is related
to a tree, the pressure in a excessive wind can
be significantly lowered by inserting a spring
about I of an inch by 6 inches lengthy in each
ropes, earlier than passing by the pulleys.

CHEAP and pretty environment friendly insulator might
be made out of a big picket spool
or reel. First bake the spool in an oven to
drive off all moisture,’ then soak in melted
paraffin wax. Bake once more, and eventually give
a great coat of shellac.
• * *
THE IMPEDANCE of an inter-valve coup-
ling must be at the very least equal to the im-
pedance of the valve itself.

GOOD earth system is as essential as a
good aerial. The water pipe isn’t al-
methods passable, particularly if it travels far
earlier than reaching the earth. In such instances a
good earth could be made by burying a big
coil of fencing wire in spiral type—about
six ft deep.

F YOU have an “L” sort aerial, and alter
to the “T” sort, you’ll reduce down the
pure wave-length significantly.

V SLIDER for a tuning coil can simply be
.. made by soldering a bit of brass to
the bottom of a terminal to make contact with
the coil. The rod could also be a lqngth of
brass wire of such a dimension that the terminal
slides freley. The terminal is clamped on
by way of the terminal set screw.

P.13 – The Security Valve[edit]

The Security Valve
Readers are urged to specific their opinions
on issues pertaining to broadcasting. If
you may have some grievance, you probably have some
constructive criticism to supply, right here is your
probability for expression—your safety-valve. The
editor assumes no accountability for state-
ments made by readers and printed on this
web page, as opinions of correspondents don’t
signify our editorial insurance policies or beliefs.
Nameless letters usually are not thought-about.
Boxing Broadcasts
Pricey Sir,—What has occurred to Sydney
boxing? I used to listen-in to the boxing
broadcasts; and I usually discovered the an-
nouncer’s descriptions completely plain and
lucid. In reality, from what he stated, I might
comply with the entire struggle. However now the boxers
appear to have gone mad. The poor an-
nouncer evidently can’t comply with them. His
frenzied utterances make me pity him in
his misery. Final Saturday evening should
have been extraordinarily painful for him.. He
merely couldn’t discover one phrase to explain
what was taking place.
After all, it might be the announcer him-
self who’s at fault;. Many amongst my pals
have stated so. However I can not imagine that
the New South Wales Broadcasting Firm
Restricted would permit an inefficient announcer
to broadcast of their identify.
Yours, and so forth.,
AN OLD PRIZEFIGHTER.
Wendouree.
Good Needs
Pricey Sir, —Allow me to thanks for the
weekly copy of your esteemed publication,
which reaches me so often each week.
I’ve learn the “Wi-fi Weekly” virtually
from its inception—for sure, with
nice profit to myself and others. I’ve
watched with curiosity its improvement and
continued enchancment.
Let me congratulate you on the excellence
of the “Wi-fi Weekly.” I’ve discovered it
most instructive and illuminating, although at
instances I’ve not been in a position to wholly agree
with some views expressed in an occasional
theoretical article. Wishing “Wi-fi
Weekly” and “Radio” each success for the
coming yr.—Yours, and so forth.,
REV. P. J. BAKER.
Xavier School, Kew, Melbourne.
The Imperial Rheinartz
Pricey Sir, —Within the Data Service
Division lately. I observed that considered one of
your readers appeared dissatisfied with the
outcomes he obtained from one of many cir-
cuits which appeared in your journal, and
he apparently concluded that the stated cir-
cuits had been extra for promoting functions
than in any other case.* This has prompted me to
write you concerning the luxurious outcomes I
have had now and again, and significantly
with the Imperial Reinartz of “Wi-fi
Weekly,” August 10.
Earlier to that I had (as I believed)
some splendid outcomes with five-valvers, and
had not the slightest conception of what a
good three-valver might do. So far I
have tuned in at full speaker quantity all of the
“A” class stations of the mainland, and likewise
a lot of the “B” class, which I acquired with the
five-valver. I’ve additionally acquired IYA,
2YA, and 7ZL (although not so loud, of
course). 3LO comes by at noon on
the speaker with honest quantity, and I’ve
tuned in 2FC and 2BL repeatedly with out
aerial or earth, and on favorable nights 3LO
and 4QG additionally.
This present day, making due allow-
ance for summer time circumstances, I contemplate this
circuit pretty much as good as most, and higher than
a few of the five-valvers I’ve dealt with, and
they had been no duffers.
I have to thanks for putting the circuit,
in addition to others, earlier than readers; and I
wish to point out that as you specify
a R.P. choke as being important, that I’ve
not but observed any marked profit from
identical. I’ve put a number of units collectively so
far, and tried the ,impact of a Radiokes Choke
first, and afterwards Honeycomb Coils of 150
to 250 turns, however I appeared to get fairly good
outcomes with out them. I’m questioning
why.
Yours, and so forth.,
WILLIAM COWEN.
Swansea.
Many Thanks
Pricey Sir,—’Would you kindly publish my
thanks and appreciation to your quite a few
readers for his or her beneficiant presents, help
and data rendered in response to my
request by your beneficial paper for the
again numbers of “Radio,” 15/8/’27, and
“Wi-fi Weekly,” 19/11/‘26. I could add
that I had •replies from Queensland, the far
west of New South Wales, and quite a few
nearer centres, which solely tends to point out the
beneficiant spirit which prevails in these in-
terested within the wi-fi world. I hope I
will have the ability to reciprocate with my experi-
ence at a later date. The data was
fortunately acquired and can be faithfully ap-
plied, and I want all of them the compliments
of the season.
Yours, and so forth.,
W. H. AUSTIN.
West Ryfle.
Climate Studies
Pricey Sir, —Virtually ail nation listeners
will agree with Mr. R. M. Russell’s letter
(“W.W.” December 21) that the time for
broadcasting climate and information gadgets as at
current, about 6.45 p.m., is ineffective to the
farmers, who’re maybe extra serious about
this stuff than anybody else. The climate
report is helpful to us for apparent causes,
and as we can not, like Mr. Suburbia, purchase our
night paper to learn on ’bus or ferry, the
information can also be very good for us to have.
6.45 is simply too early, as even when we hurry up and
end our work by then, the common nation
set can not obtain on loud-speaker at that
hour, as it’s then nonetheless daylight. If 2F’C (not
2BL, which appears usually weak) might give
us the information and climate at about 7.45 p.m.,
it could be a really actual boon to the farmer.
That speak on cricket for New Zealanders has
been nice, and it’s given at 8.50 p.m.
Yours, and so forth.,
A. E. WALKER.
Dorrigo.
Instructional Subsidy
Pricey Sir,—The time is come when, within the
pursuits of the person members of our
nice Commonwealth, ana within the company
curiosity of the Commonwealth itself, the A
class broadcasting stations ought to give pressing
and cautious consideration to a broad scheme
of nationwide schooling.
Too lengthy have our broadcasting amenities
been doomed to the service of the bottom
and most unworthy of our individuals’s feelings;
too lengthy have we seen an influence, which could
do a lot for the uplifting of our nationwide
mentality, degraded to the needs of
amusement and transient pleasure; too lengthy
have we considered a reasonably toy the in-
strument which may be part of the nations of the
earth collectively, and as a satisfying gossip the
Voice of Universality.
It’s time that our Governments or our
Schooling Departments ought to subsidise
every day academic classes, no extra for the
faculties than for the individuals. It’s executed in
England. In England all authorities have
mixed to type syllabuses of public edu-
cation. However it’s not being executed right here, al-
although Australians are happy with the actual fact
that their academic methods are above all
uthers. Australians must be ashamed of
the truth that, after broadcasting, technically,
has develop into virtually good, nothing has been
executed, even experimentally, to deliver nearer
the accomplishment of public instruction
We’re lamentably behind the instances.
I don’t intend to make any options
right here as to how an academic session might
be commenced: I merely state the information of
the case, and belief that there could also be others
of your readers public-spirited sufficient to
give some backing to my opinions.
Yours, and so forth.,
W. ADRIAN.
Carranderee.
Grin and Glum
Pricey Sir, —Kindly permit me to answer to
‘ Queenslander” (“W.W.,” 14/12/28), on “4QG
Blunders. ”
I hearken to 4QG each morning, and I feel
the announcer possesses a very good broad-
casting voice. It’s a healthful Australian
one, and all the time comes by remarkably
clearly and distinctly.
This, to my mind-set, fairly makes
up for errors (if any) in pronunciation.
The factor that issues is the information, and
“Queenslander” should admit we get that, and
get it properly. What extra do we would like within the
information session? It’s not a lecture on English,
and until one is a professor, or at a gram-
mar faculty, who cares a hold whether or not it’s
referred to as “debree” or “debbizz,” as long as we
perceive?
Some individuals are for ever digging up and
harping on technical irregularities, and in
looking for the dangerous should permit a lot of the
good and exquisite to cross them by, like
“Grin and Glum” surveying the pot crops.
Glum remarks, “What unsightly-looking
pots?” Grin, not noticing the pots: “What
stunning flowers!” Is “Queenslander” a
“Glum”? Anyhow, 4QG’s announcer “peels
the potatoes” adequate for,
Yours, and so forth.,
“KOBO,”
Tweed River.

P.14 – The Financial Radio Shops Advert[edit]

• – – •• –
ELECTRIC POWER is
CHEAP-SURE-CONVENIENT
AND
YOUR SET could be made All Electrical
with none alterations!
HERE ARE TWO MODERN, EFFICIENT POWER UNITS YOU
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT. THEY CAN BE USED WITH ANY SET
THE FAMOUS
ECONOMIC
B’LJMINATOR
Replaces Out of date
“B” BATTERIES
Outcomes
are
Assured
The New Financial Dry Metallic
Residence-Meeting “A” Battery
Charger.
KEEPS YOUR “A”
BATTERY ALWAYS
IN ACTION
That is the unique Package which introduced “B” Elimin-
ators inside attain of all people. It’s a easy,
high-power Eliminator, adaptable to any make of
set. Lots of are in fixed use all through
each a part of Australia.
Anyone could make one in lower than two hours.
That is the newest sort of Metallic Rectifier. There
isn’t any valve—no acid—-no liquid, and no transferring
elements. It costs, two, 4, or six volt Batteries.
Whenever you swap off your set, swap on the
charger, and it’ll silently and mechanically re-
place the present you may have drawn from the “A”
Battery. ‘
59/6
LET THE HOUSE LIGHTING
POWER DR VE YOUR SET
55/-
PILOT CONDENSERS.
0005 14/6
00035 13/6
00025 12/6
00015 11/3
PILOT DIALS.
Double Drum, 39/6.
Single Drum, 22/6.
Artwork Vernier, 7/6.
MIGNON TRANSFORMERS. ‘
Cub, 35 and 5 to 1, 10/6
Junior, ,, y, ,, ,, l 5/-
Tremendous n n n u 21 /‘
BOX CONE SPEAKERS.
A FEW LEFT AT
10/.
Orange:
120 A Summer time
Avenue.
‘Telephone:
Orange 735.
NEWCASTLE:
13 Union Avenue.
‘Telephone, Newcastle
1622.
“Yours for Decrease Costs and Service that Satisfies
THE ECONOMIC RADIO STORES,
SYDNEY—NEWCASTLE—PARRAMATTA—ORANGE.
Handle Mail Orders, 492 George Avenue, Sydney.
COUNTRY CLIENTS. —Our elements are completely assured to provide satisfaction, cend
your orders to us conditionally that your cash is refunded if you’re not happy
with the products upon receipt of identical. Items should be returned to us inside ten days.
We Pay Carriage on All Orders of 10/- and over. Valves and items specifically pro-
cured can’t be exchanged. Phrases Money. No reductions.
Parramatta:
Cnr. Church and
Macquarie Streets.
’Telephone:
UW9601.

P.15 – The Air Scout[edit]

The AIR SCOUT by DON B. KNOCK (Affiliate Technical Editor)

CIRCUIT PROVIDES FOR ELECTRICAL GRAMOPHONE REPRODUCTION.

UNIQUE METHOD OF ASSEMBLY FACILITATES CONSTRUCTION.

NO BATTERIES: OPERATES STRAIGHT FROM POWER POINT.

Constructional information for an All-Electrical Receiver are given within the article beneath. Though some care and talent are required within the making, a substantial amount of expertise isn’t required, because the elements can be found in an easily-wired type. The duvet image reveals the good-looking facet of the completed receiver. It equals most commercially-built receivers in look. By DON B. KNOCK (Affiliate Technical Editor)

Background. I’ve not given a lot publicity in technical constructional articles beforehand to what’s aptly termed the “all-electric” receiver; the rationale for my silence being that for many who are serious about whole socket energy operation there are lots of very wonderful industrial productions out there. A wi-fi fanatic might develop into very proficient within the matter of assembling, testing, and utilizing the traditional sort of receiver, with its valves deriving their filament provide from a innocent accumulator and plate voltage from B batteries, however when the development of an all-electric set is contemplated, it’s best to let properly alone until the would-be constructor is conversant with the ins and outs of energy provide. One might go to distinguished firms in Sydney and purchase full and prepared for motion receivers, operated from the sunshine socket or power-point within the house, with a minimal of fuss and bother. Snap goes the swap, and the set involves life, and plate and filament voltage worries are a factor of the previous — until the municipal electrical provide breaks down, which is, thankfully, uncommon in as of late. The all-electric receiver solely appeals to town and suburban resident. Within the nation it’s not to be thought-about, excepting in cities the place alternating present provide is offered. But Australia is within the technique of continuous improvement, and all of the nation cities, with moderately massive inhabitants, will, sooner or later, have their very own electrical provide. There may be one bother with many all-electric units and that’s, that they tend to broad tuning, which can or might not be annoying when the set is used near the transmitter of an area broadcasting station. This characteristic issues little or no when the set is used away within the nation, and the selectivity is sweet sufficient for something. Even within the metropolis, if slightly interference is current on 3LO from 2BL, any such slight drawback is balanced up by the good utility of the all-electric set, and, as I’ve stated earlier than, there’s nothing amiss with our personal native programmes. To begin to construct an all-electric receiver isn’t a straightforward proposition to those that usually are not actually conscious of what to anticipate, however when an entire equipment of elements for such a receiver is positioned available on the market, with express directions as to the meeting and the wiring, it’s no harder to aim efficiently than the common Reinartz or Marco 4. The Air Scout 5 is an all-electric receiver, constructed from the entire equipment of elements as obtainable from the well-known Pilot brokers, Harringtons, Ltd., George Avenue, Sydney. Not too long ago the receiver operated fully from the house energy provide has loved an amazing increase in America. This was solely to be anticipated, as each little city has its alternating present provide. The increase got here with such a rush that radio producers had been confronted with the issues of changing present D.C units for energy provide. Technical journals gave many directions on how this can be achieved in varied methods. One was the usage of particular valves with what was termed an “A.C. Harness.” These valves had been merely positioned within the sockets of the receiver, and by an exterior versatile mixture of wire, the cathodes had been heated from a transformer. Troubles then arose with neutralised R.F. amplifiers, and the like, and the applying didn’t all the time show profitable. These conversions had been passable of their approach, however had been overshadowed by the introduction of the commercially-designed all-electric receivers, of which there at the moment are many splendid examples in America. Considered one of these is that for which we provide constructional particulars on this article.

Realising the crave with the general public for the satisfaction of watching issues develop below their very own arms, the fabric for the Air Scout 5 was positioned available on the market in equipment type, by the Pilot Firm. The result’s that these progressive constructors who might want to construct a receiver to function fully from their house electrical provide now have this equipment at their disposal in Sydney. The images present what the assembled equipment seems like in its operative type. The panel entrance is especially enticing, with its drum management. The Pilot double-drum management drives a .00035 variable condenser on the left, tuning the aerial coupling unit. On the precise the drive actuates two ganged variable condensers, additionally of .00035 m.f.d. capability, tuning the second R.F. amplifier and detector circuits, respectively. This Pilot drum management is reasonably distinctive in its building and motion. It possesses all of the comfort of fast changes by way of the massive direct driving-wheel, and on the identical time offers for a superb vernier management, owing to the inclusion of the smaller driving discount wheels on both aspect of the primary drives. The left and proper hand sections of the double drums are insulated from one another, however could also be readily related collectively if required, and it is going to be seen from the circuit diagram of the Air Scout 5 that each one the rotors are widespread. The vernier drive is especially clean in motion, as it’s taken up by a friction machine, which is superior to any geared association. It’s usually discovered with a geared drive, that, until it’s a mannequin of engineering perfection, it’s not optimistic in motion, and reveals up what’s termed “backlash,” probably the most annoying of disadvantages the place high-quality tune is anxious. Additionally the gears are apt to arrange a mixture of mechanical and electrical noise which turns into significantly magnified when utilizing a receiver on the upper frequencies. Owing to the smoothness of motion of the friction drive, the Pilot drum can be best for shortwave tuning, which isn’t true on many drum controls. A number of phrases of recommendation are essential concerning the mounting of this drum management. The drilling diagram reveals the place the panel controls are positioned. Step one is to chop the mandatory area within the panel. Lay the drilling template, provided with the drum, over the panel, fixing it in place with slightly seccotine. The centres for the holes are then marked by the template by way of mild centre-punching. Drill the holes, and knock out the centre piece, countersinking the holes for the screws holding the drum body. The condensers must be mounted on the drum earlier than the entire is connected to the panel. Two little diagrams, Figs. 1 and a couple of, present the usage of the slotted clamping brace for locking the condensers to the drums. The left-hand mounting reveals how the brace is mounted for the condenser on that aspect, and the right-hand mounting, equally, for the right-hand condenser. With the bracket mounted briefly, the condenser spindle is put into the opening within the drum-shaft, and the brace is mounted to the brief threaded bushing, on the dial finish plate. If any doubt exists as to the tactic of meeting, the entire directions accompany the drum unit. The utility of this explicit drum-drive is that it permits for single or ganged condensers on either side. The one different controls on the panel entrance are a quantity management (on the left of the dials), which consists of a 400 ohm resistance, a midget vernier compensating condenser throughout the second R.F. tuning management, a three-circuit jack, for gramophone pick-up use, and an “on-off” swap.

A really fascinating characteristic of the Air Scout 5 is the coil items. There are three — aerial coupling, second R.F., and detector circuits. They include a novel association, generally known as the Pilot Rediblox. Other than this receiver, these items could also be obtained individually, and constructed up in fast time to be used in trendy circuits. They need to be invaluable to the experimenter in as of late of fast progress. It turns into simple to make what would in any other case be sophisticated receivers, by way of these Rediblox. They’re extraordinarily compact, and eradicate many drilling and mounting issues, and are obtainable in a common R.F. sort, battery detector sort, A.C. detector sort, audio transformer sort, and resistance audio coupling sort. The coils for which these blocks are constructed are of the midget sort, wound on particular formers to plug into a regular U.X. valve socket. Coils wound on these formers can be best, as an illustration, within the Midget Display Grid short-wave 4 I lately described. The coils as obtainable are made for the published band, and canopy a variety from 190 to 550 metres, when tuned by a .00035 variable condenser. The back-of-panel views present how the Rediblox are organized within the Air Scout 5, and the wiring could also be readily adopted from the point-to-point diagram. First, within the aerial circuit, we have now the kind 305 R.F. This is similar sort within the second R.F. stage. The detector stage is the kind 306 U.Y. 227 A.C. detector. This has the particular 5-pin socket for the Radiotron U.Y. 227 A.C. detector valve. Lastly the 2 audio levels are each sort 302 common audio transformer. They might be readily recognized by checking up the pictures with the wiring diagram. Wanting on the {photograph} plan of the set, and dealing from left to proper, the elements are within the following order. On the again of the sub-panel on the left could also be seen two energy plugs. The strategy of connecting these is clear from the circuit diagram, exhibiting that they’re in parallel. The thought of that is to simplify the connection for the B eliminator. By connecting one plug to the home power-point, the 240-volt A.C. provide is fed to the first of the filament transformer for the valves, and by merely inserting the B eliminator plug within the second plug socket, which is related in parallel, the excessive pressure provide is taken from the receiver itself with out the need for operating a protracted flex lead from a separate power-point. Instantly in entrance of those twin plugs is positioned the filament transformer. This transformer is specifically manufactured by the Pilot Firm for A.C. receivers, and has many benefits to suggest it. The sort is No. 388 A.C. filament transformer. The secondary voltages obtainable are:— 1½ volts, 2½ volts, and 5 volts. It will likely be seen that these voltages are designed to function 1 or 2 U.Y. 227 valves, 1 to five U.X. 226 valves, and 1 to 2 U.X. 171 valves. There isn’t any want to make use of centre faucet balancing resistances throughout the secondary outputs, as every secondary is supplied with a centre faucet which is electrically appropriate. This transformer is designed to function any sort of A.C. receiver as much as an 8-valve superheterodyne. In entrance of the filament transformer is the audio frequency choke, used within the output filter to the loudspeaker. Though within the authentic set it is a Pilot, any of the well-known chokes, resembling Ferranti B.I., A.W.A., or Emmco, will serve equally properly for the aim.

The primary of the Rediblox is on the precise of the elements described. That is the primary one within the order of the circuit diagram, sort No. 305, for the aerial coupling, and makes use of a U.X. 226 A.C. valve. The following one, on the precise (within the plan {photograph}), is the second audio amplifier, or output stage. That is sort No. 302, and takes a U.X. 171 valve. The third block from the left is the second R.F. stage, additionally a kind 305, used with a U.X. 226 A.C. valve. Subsequent comes the primary audio stage, sort 302, used with a U.X. 226 A.C. valve, and, lastly, is the detector block, which has a particular 5-pin socket, to take the U.Y. 227 valve. That is the kind 306. The U.Y. 227 valve is of the independently heated cathode sort. This must be obvious from the circuit diagram, the place the grid return is proven related to the cathode (a separate factor), and the filament doing responsibility as a heater alone. The bypass condensers used within the circuit are carried beneath the sub-panel, along with all of the wiring. The sub-panel needn’t be Eight inches vast, however ought to permit an area between the panel and its front-edge. It will permit ample room for the “on-off” swap, the amount management, compensating condenser, and the jack for the gramophone pick-up. No switching system is offered for this software of the gramophone for electrical copy. All that’s essential is to plug in a gramophone pick-up, and your loudspeaker, offered it’s a good one, will reproduce data much better electrically than is feasible with the gramophone itself.

The back-of-panel wiring diagram reveals the lay-out of the receiver, with positions of all terminals, and so forth. The output for the loudspeaker is taken from two terminals on the sub-panel, as proven. Wanting on the circuit diagram, it is going to be observed that no regeneration is offered. By the understanding of every element with infinite care, analysis engineers have been in a position to deliver the Air Scout 5 to a excessive diploma of effectivity, with out recourse to regeneration. The result’s that the tuning is sharp, with none lack of high quality, and is delicate, with none problem of adjustment. It will have been simple for the engineers in designing this receiver to have allowed for regeneration within the R.F. circuits, however it was realised that within the arms of the common operator such circuits are liable to be vital and unsatisfactory. The Airscout 5 is subsequently a really fascinating sort of receiver for various causes in its favour. It’s operated fully from the home energy, it’s simple to regulate, it offers a excessive diploma of high quality copy, and (essential) it doesn’t trigger interference with different listeners.

It turns into essential now and again to warn listeners in regards to the extreme use of response. It usually occurs that many usually are not conscious that their receivers are in an oscillating situation though the standard of their very own reception is ruined along with their receivers being a supply of annoyance to different listeners within the neighbourhood. The wiring up of the Airscout 5 must be executed with insulated flex wire resembling Acme, and the place leads go to valve sockets from the filament transformer they need to include twisted versatile wire of the home lighting sort. By utilizing twisted flex, for these circuits slightly capability is included within the wiring, and has the impact of tending to filter out any alternating present hum. The wiring can be higher adopted from the point-to-point diagram than from verbal directions. The set when accomplished is sufficiently delicate for use on fairly a small indoor aerial for native stations, however it’s essential to make use of a suitably designed outdoors aerial for different stations. You will see that the RediBlox types one of the crucial handy strategies of assembling a receiver ever devised, and they’re most handy due to the elimination of a lot wiring. The meeting equipment for this receiver is provided full with directions, and the panels are prepared drilled and engraved, so that there’s little or no risk of creating a mistake. One of the best ways to go about it’s to mount the entrance panel elements first after which cope with the sub-panel. For the same old out of doors aerial, this could have a size of not more than 70 ft over-all. Utilizing this with a great earth connection native and inter-State stations can be properly acquired, and with an indoor aerial about 40 ft lengthy across the image rail each native station can be at full quantity. It is very important use a great loud speaker with this set, and the one used to hold out the checks was an Amplion AC9 Cone, which gave wonderful copy free from any hint of hum. There may be one level to recollect with the AC valves used. After switching on the set it’s essential to attend about 20 seconds for the valves to return into operation. That is due largely to the UY227 detector, which requires this approximate interval earlier than the warmth from the filament is transferred sufficiently to the cathode. Tuning is simple, and there aren’t any changes of filament present or grid biasing, as these options type a part of the design of the receiver. Set the amount management at in regards to the mid place, and switch the 2 drums collectively. Use the compensating condenser for finest adjustment, ideally on a distant station, and make last tuning changes with the vernier controls. For many who might want to contemplate different makes and kinds of AC valves with this receiver, the enterprising firm of Philips Lamps, Ltd., have now positioned available on the market what might be the most important vary of AC valves manufactured by any firm on the earth. These embrace screen-grid AC valves, which open up very fascinating prospects in each broadcast and shortwave all-electric receivers.

(Begin Graphic Caption) LEFT HAND MOUNTING (Finish Graphic Caption)

(Begin Graphic Caption) RIGHT HAND MOUNTING (Finish Graphic Caption)

(Begin Picture Caption) This angle view reveals the finished receiver earlier than being positioned in cupboard. Notice the place of the elements. (Finish Picture Caption)

Record of Elements for the Air Scout 5

  • 1 panel, 24 x Eight x 3-16in.
  • 1 sub-panel, 23 x Eight x 3-16 in.
  • 1 Pilot 1281 Double Drum.
  • 1 Pilot No. 388 A.C. Filament Transformer.
  • Three Pilot .00035mfd. variable condensers.
  • 2 No. 305 Pilot R.F. Rediblox.
  • 1 No. 176 Set of three coils.
  • 1 No. 306 Pilot UY 227 Detector Rediblox.
  • 2 No. 302 Pilot A.C. Rediblox with Transformers.
  • Three Pilot No. 1617 Var. Condensers .00035 M.F.
  • 1 Pilot No. J7 Midget Condenser, .00025 M.F.
  • 1 Pilot No. 350 Resistograd.
  • 1 Audio Choke Emmco or A.W.A.
  • 1 Imperia by-pass 2 M.F. Condenser.
  • 2 Imperia by-pass 1 M.F. Condenser.
  • 1 Pilot No. 959 A.C. Resistor C bias.
  • 1 Pilot No. 951 UX 171 Resistor C bias.
  • Four Pilot UY valve sockets.
  • 1 Pilot UX valve socket.
  • 1 3-circuit Jack.
  • 1 Filament swap.[3]

P.18 – Distributing Data by Wi-fi[edit]

Distributing Data by Wi-fi.
THERE have already been many evi-
dences of the assorted makes use of of wi-fi
broadcasting: for leisure, in-
struction, and for speaking
information and data to most of the people.
It’s a well-recognised accountability of each
broadcasting station supervisor to maintain his
listeners properly knowledgeable of present happen-
ings in politics, social affairs, sport, and
commerce.
A putting demonstration of the usefulness
of a station for conserving individuals in contact has
been given by 3LO recently. The nightly ap-
peal and prayers by the Anglican Archbishop
of Melbourne, Dr. Harrington Lees, for the
restoration of His Majesty the King, is without delay
a profound acknowledgment of the sympa-
thetic curiosity taken in His Majesty’s well being,
and a really convincing admission of the actual fact
that broadcasting enters each house.
A extra spectacular demonstration might
scarcely be given: the Archbishop interesting
for co-operation in prayers for the restoration
of the Sovereign’s well being, realizing that there
isn’t any medium that might evaluate with the
broadcasting station for addressing the
largest practicable viewers.
One can think about loyal topics of the King,
in metropolis mansion and village cottage, stand-
ing in sympathetic and respectful homage
because the Nationwide Anthem is performed, and the
fervent Amens that had been reverently mut-
tered because the Archbishop concluded his
prayers. And might we think about another
technique of thrilling such curiosity and atten-
tion concurrently! There definitely is
nothing to check with broadcasting because the
trendy technique of promulgating a procla-
mation to the individuals or informing them on
an?/ topic of basic curiosity.
We have gotten accustomed to basic
broadcasts: addresses, bulletins, and so forth.,
from one level for the knowledge of the
entire inhabitants. In Australia, maybe l , the
most notable of those demonstrations was
the ceremonies related to the opening
of the Federal Parliament at Canberra final
yr by the Duke of York. The broadcasts
from a lot of the Australian stations had been
certainly an epochal transmission.
In England one would, suppose the outstand-
ing manifestation of broadcasts for all listen-
ers was in reference to the final strike
in 1926. The standard and older means whereby
the individuals had been in a position to study of the modifications
within the stirring occasions —the press—was sud-
denly denied them. The press had been
silenced by the strikers, however the broadcast-
ing stations and the tens of millions of listeners units
had been nonetheless working, and couldn’t so simply
be put out of motion. The Authorities
promptly realised the alternatives open to
it and virtually took over the stations; at
all occasions as far as the broadcasting of reports
was involved. And along with in-
forming the listeners all through the United
Kingdom of the every day place on the “strike
entrance,” very essential directions and in-
formation had been conveyed to the final
public.
Comparable, however most likely not so extraordinary,
cases of basic broadcasts might be
cited in varied nations: all of them would
show the common curiosity and at-
tention that broadcasting produces.

P.19 – Metropolitan Electrical Advert[edit]

Tpl a T“?Zero OPEN THE NEW YEAR
tV l 1 Jr 1 y J i’ With Vital Announcement
THE NEW SHORT-WAVE SCREEN GRID
TUNER KIT WILL BE INTO PRODUCTION
SHORTLY AFTER THE HOLIDAYS
This Package consists of particular mounting base and 4 de Luxe inductance items protecting a wave*
band from 15 to 115 metres at an entire price of 72/6 per Package.
Particular extra coils, protecting further wave-bands, could also be obtained to swimsuit this Package.
Radiokes Commonplace Quick-wave Tuner
IS STILL AS POPULAR AS EVER
IB
» m,
Overlaying wave-bands from 15 to 130 meters, and consisting of mounting base, variable antenna coil, and
three interchangeable inductance items, and priced at 55 r per equipment.
This Coil Package is really a superb instance of highly-finished, well-executed, and environment friendly Australian manu-
facture. Constructed and designed by Australians to swimsuit Australian broadcasting circumstances. Adopted as customary
by all technical journals, radio editors, producers, and experimenters who know—all through the Com-
monwealth.
The Everyman’s Display Grid 4
Receiver
in final problem of “Wi-fi Weekly” calls
for
RADIOKES EVERYMAN’S
FOUR S.G. KIT
The Package pictured above is a modified Bayer and sells for however £l/5/ per equipment. Could also be used for any of the
ordinary 4 tube receivers, in addition to for display screen grid work.
Nicely designed, fantastically completed and distinctive in look, this equipment is especially environment friendly, and one
which commends itself to good consideration.
From all good Sellers all over the place, or direct from
Metropolitan Electrical Co. Ltd.
126-130 SUSSEX STREET, SYDNEY.
i

P.20 – Producers Merchandise Advert[edit]

m.
Sri
MSB

•**

Modernize Your Set
Discard the out of date “A” Battery.
Banish the difficulty and inconvenience of incessantly changing your previous dry
“A” batteries or lumbering your moist “A” battery alongside to some distant ser-
vice station for re-charging.
SECURE an EMMCO “A” ELIMINATOR.
Merely plug in to the electrical circuit and it’s prepared to be used with ANY TYPE
of Receiver WITHOUT ALTERATION within the wiring of any set as much as 10
valves.
NO NOISE, NO TROUBLE, NO DANGER, simply plug into the lamp socket
on the AC provide. PRICE, £l2/12/-
In case you have not put in a “B” Eliminator use
the MAXUM # “B‘’ Socket Energy designed to
function units as much as, and together with, Seven Valves,
Knob management permits a variation of 20 Volts for
all tappings, while by altering connection to re-
sistance strip inside case voltages could be modified
to completely different Values.
V31» ‘ 7.3,“. “J” ‘. , .
¢{*’»/Q&”’$‘% 32%:*l’.21?r“ ‘

‘ 7—7‘2:-¢»;,2,«¥..2¢;g..m _. we?

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‘ ‘7‘ 1 «L. « ‘ _. ‘ 31.3:8‘5 . “3 .3; ., ‘1 ~;..:’g>~«“ 53355 t
‘ »’ . ‘ “3N“ $1952 . ‘ ‘- .”w W ,‘,-3“:2:L‘,3N.72-9,: L
59% – . ~. (“qu gt“, ‘ A _‘ ‘ ’ H J» ”3*, figflé
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w,‘ . – ’33:. , . 4‘ , 3321″“ ‘v-‘,’/
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‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ” –..g”’-:’v‘: “ 7‘ ’5 ‘5 15111:; – 5155.4
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I . ‘ I ’. ‘ lat”, » ‘- _ ,Okay- m, g /‘, 1/

1“ , – . L .14.: 11135353 ‘ W ‘9 ’57::3’mS I‘ a;

” ‘ : 1-‘<'.1:..r=~ 15;; 1;» x u I,‘ ' :I ’32; ‘ 1:“)..37 ,1.“V"'/,J'i ‘ ~ , I ' .. "‘ A." 1:». . mauve-yr”..m’w.” . ‘ WW‘ "“1 , "521m W > ‘ I 53.:
A Maxum and an A Energy Provide collectively converts your
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an improved “B” Eliminator,
PRICE, £B/15/-
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ALL EMMCO PRODUCTS ARE FULLY GUARANTEED

P.21 – Hitting Under the Broadcast Belt[edit]

HITTING BELOW the BROADCAST BELT. (Shortwave and Newbie Notes by VK2NO)

NOT solely have we been pestered by a deluge of static on all wave-bands, however now we have now to endure ruination of 5SW’s worldwide transmissions on the brand new wave of 25 metres by industrial telegraphy interference. In latest days there was an inclination instantly a telegraphy sign has arrived on prime of a shortwave worldwide transmission to put the blame with the experimental transmitter. Maybe on the 32-metre band beforehand utilized by the experimenter on this a part of the world the criticism has at instances been justified. The “old-timers,” those that have been pounding a key within the experimental ranks for years, have all the time taken precaution to make sure that their transmitters have been tuned properly away from any telephony programme, however it should be remembered that not all are “old-timers.” Numerous newcomers have arrived within the experimental transmitting ranks, and a brand new station beginning up is apt to stray slightly from the frequencies of advantage, till he’s
taken in hand by his extra skilled colleagues. It must be apparent that the experimental transmitters’ organisation forbids interference with industrial companies, and the ignorant offender is speedily rounded up and knowledgeable of his “off wave” operation.
Now we have now run up in opposition to a evident
case of economic interference with inter-
nationwide broadcast transmissions. 2BL and
2FC have tried relays of SSW throughout
the previous week, and listeners have been an-
noyed to listen to the music and bulletins
chopped to items by high-speed Morse trans-
mission. This Morse emanates from the
Australian Beam station, at Ballan, in Vic-
toria, however the beam station is to not blame
for the interference. The difficulty lies with
SSW. The beam stations had been erected and
put into operation lengthy earlier than worldwide
broadcasting was a daily characteristic, and to
ask for a change of wave size in beam
transmission means alteration of aerial de-
signal and a prolonged course of usually.
SSW has modified from 24 to 25 metres,
and, consequently, has positioned itself very
near the frequencies used for beam com-
munication. The one various appears to
be for SSW to seek out yet one more frequency for
its transmissions, and a cable notifying the
B.B.C. of the prevailing interference has been
despatched this week. It stays to be seen what
impact the cable has, for the B.B.C. is notor-
iously strong and gradual to maneuver. If the re-
ception of the London programmes within the
Antipodes is the primary object of 5SW’s exis-
tence the matter of one other frequency change
must be speedily handled, but when different
elements of the world are thought-about first, the
engineers accountable for the operation of
SSW might baulk on the technique of retuning.
Naturally this interference will exist on
Radio Paris additionally, as this station can also be close to
the identical frequency, however, though Radio
Paris began with a high-quality burst, it is just
working intermittently at current. 5SW’s
actual wave size is at current 25.53 metres.
7LO, Nairobi, was coming in with excel-
lent power within the early morning of De-
cember 19. His musical gadgets had been very
clear, and that is the most effective I’ve but heard
from this station. Formally the wave size
of 7LO is 35 metres, however I discover him slightly
beneath 33 metres in keeping with my customary
wave meter.

The well-known Philips Firm have a
sister station to PCJJ on the air. That is
PCLL, which is to be heard often on
33.Eight and 18.Four metres.

ANE, Java, is to be heard with musical
programmes on 15.9 metres each Wednes-
day from 12.30 to 13.30 G.M.T. (10.30 to
11.30 p.m., Sydney time). I don’t hear
a lot from 2XAF at current, though the
different station, 2XAD, is commonly to be heard in
the early mornings, however not too properly.
Altogether worldwide broadcasting is
very spasmodic at current, however the good instances
will come when the relentless static and
“fading” demons will take a relaxation. Nothing
has been heard of our previous good friend, Gerald
Marcuse, G2NM, however I suppose that, with the
new rules now in pressure and the ad-
vent of SSW, he can have closed down. The
transmitting fraternity will welcome him
again to the important thing, nonetheless.
The Australian experimental transmitters
have arrived on 42 metres in ones and twos.
Opposite to expectations, they sound very
hole, in comparison with the 32-metre indicators.
It’s going to take some little time to herd every-
one into their final place within the new
frequency bands, and till that is executed it
requires little creativeness to grasp the futi-
lity of carrying on an uninterrupted two-
approach yarn with our American pals.
On the time of writing my very own station is
in operation with the 1929 tuned-plate-
tuned-grid transmitter, nonetheless on 32 metres, however
by the point these strains attain print a change
can be made to 42 and 21 metres. My pre-
diction is that the Australian transmitter
will use the 42-metre band for native and
inter-State workings, and can resort to the
21-metre band for his worldwide work.
We’re in a peculiar place on the globe
for 20-metre communication; however as soon as the
stations arrive there and persist in sticking
to it for some time the identical previous factor will
occur.
It’s protected to say that at a while or
different the proprietor of each experimental sta-
tion on the earth takes a glance down on 20,
and if he hears nothing however industrial sig-
nals again go his 40-metre coils within the re-
ceiver, and his transmitter stays set, with-
out being tuned to 20. But when he immediately
hears an experimental transmitter on the
different finish of the earth calling CQ, there’s
a frantic rush to tune to 20 and reply him.
By that point the calling station has given
up the hunt, and likewise gone again to 40.
My expertise has been that constant
calling on 20 has ultimately elicited a reply
from someplace. This band is unquestionably
going to be our solely hope for worldwide
work with out interference.
Mr. Ray Carter, VK2HC, of Quirindi,
N.S.W., whose station was lately wrecked
by lightning, is able to begin up once more.
Quick-wave broadcast listeners will usually
hear some excellent telephony from Mr.
Carter. Ten metres nonetheless attracts the at-
tention of a band of lovers down south,
notably amongst them VK7DX and VK7CW.
This frequency isn’t really a waste oi
time, however searching for indicators there’s like
searching for the proverbial needle within the hay-
stack.
Judging by the erratic behaviour of 10-
metre indicators, I -do not suppose the Australian
transmitter will, besides in remoted instances, even
pay any consideration to the 5-metre band. For
evening communication as much as distances 1000
miles and even 2000 miles away, the 160-
metre band granted below the brand new regula-
tions can be best. Sadly it’s
offset by the presence of numerous broadcast
station harmonics, heavy static, and the
risk of interference with close by broad-
solid listeners. However, it is going to be a
very helpful frequency within the winter-time, and
broadcast listeners will do properly to both
construct particular receivers or take some turns
off their grid coils, as there’s certain to be
numerous experimental telephony there
within the close to future.
Some Japanese experimental stations have
eventually been licensed. Our colleagues of the
Land of the Rising Solar have had a tough
time of it attempting to influence their Govern-
ment that they deserved a spot “within the
solar.” Hitherto they’ve operated below
cowl, declared pirates, and of necessity had
to maintain their addresses secret.
These licensed are:— J3CH, J3CF, J3CB,
J3CC, J3CG, and J3CE.
Most of those are well-known males who
have had numerous communications with
Australians and New Zealanders, and in case
of bother with their authorities I go away it to
those that open up with them to seek out out
their id.

Discover is given right here that from December 8, 1928, VK2NO will merge with VK2AW. VK2AW has been in lively operation over the last 4 months on the 32-metre band, and on this brief area of time his indicators from the grasp oscillator energy amplifier used have been heard in all corners of the earth. VK2AW-2NO is in the intervening time within the technique of reconstruction, and the outcome can be one of the crucial complete, up-to-date, and full experimental stations on the earth.
Transmitters are being constructed to be used on each frequency allotted to experimenters from January, 1929. The primary 7000 and 14,000 Okay.C. transmitters can be crystal managed, and there can be two stand-by self-excited transmitters of the T.P.T.G., 1929 sort out there at a second’s discover. Provision can be made for telephony transmission. The primary operation from VK2AW-VK2NO can be for some time on the 14,000 Okay.C. band (21m.), by way of the primary crystal management transmitter. It’s hoped to begin the ball rolling with our English pals on this frequency once more. Studies on transmissions could also be addressed to the station, c/o Mr. A. W. Dye, Martin Street, Centennial Park, Sydney, or to Don B. Knock, Affiliate Technical Editor, “WIRELESS WEEKLY.” It’s hoped to maintain virtually steady watches, and within the matter of engineering the station Mr. Knock and Mr. Dye can be ably assisted by Mr. Ian Dye, who’s a progressive junior operator.

P.22 – Colville Moore Wi-fi Provides Advert[edit]

AIRSCOUT FIVE
Come and see us! With out obligation we can be delighted to point out you the way merely and the way cheaply you
can construct a best Radio Receiver for your self. You require no nice information. We gladly provide
you each help. With our in depth expertise in Wi-fi issues behind you, success is assured, ivith-
out the slightest danger of failure. Absolute satisfaction assured.
Under is a listing of elements appropriate for constructing the receiver described on this problem.
£ s d
1 Panel 24 x Eight x 3-16 Bakelite 0 12 0
1 Panel 23 x Eight x 3-16 Bakelite …… 011 8
1 Pilot 1281, Double Drum Dial 1 19 6
1 Pilot 388 A.C. FIL Transformer .. 2 12 6
Three Pilot .0005 Condensers ………. 2 Zero 6
2 Pilot No. 300 R.F. Rediblox 1 13 0
1 Pilot No. 301 U.Y. 227 Rediblox, det. 0 16 6
1 Set of Coils (3) No. 176… 1 5 6
1 Pilot J. 7 Midget Cond. .00025 .. Zero 6 6
1 Pilot Resistograd . . …….. Zero Eight 6
1 Emmco Audio Chbke 0 17 6
£ s d
2 Pilot Rediblox, with trans 4 12 0
2 Imperia 1 M.F. cond Zero Eight 0
1 Imperia 2 M.F. cond Zero 5 6
1 Pilot 959 A.C. Resistor, C. Bias …. 012 6
1 Pilot 951 U.X. 171, C. Bias 0 12 6
Four Pilot U.Y. Valve Sockets 0 14 0
1 Pilot U.X. Valve Socket Zero Three 3
1 Filament Swap Zero 2 0
N.P. Bolts and Nuts, per dozen Zero 1 0
Wooden Screws, % and f, per dozen ….. Zero Zero 4
Bus Bar Wire, per dozen Zero 0 10
1928 Troubles Eradicated
90 per cent, of Unhealthy Reception is because of defective batteries or speaker.
Eradicate these troubles and
you’ll have good reception all the time.
Money Worth.
Colmovox “A” Battery Charger £5 10 0
Colmovox “A” and “B” Battery Charger £6 10 0
Emmco Trickle Charger £3 10 0
Philips Trickle Charger £3 10 0
Rectojc Trickle Charger £5 10 0
Philco Rechargeable Moist Battery …… £8 15 0
Oldham Rechargeable Moist Battery …. £5 Zero 0
Philips 372 Eliminator £7 15 0
Amplion A.C.7 Speaker £7 15 0
Philips, PCJJ £6 10 0
Philips Junior £5 5 0
Philips 3002 Eliminator . „ £9 15 0
Philips 3003 Eliminator, B. and C. …. £ll 15 0
Emmco Eliminator £lO 10 0
Emmco Tremendous Eliminator £l2 15 0
R.C.A. Speaker, Mannequin IOOA …….. £lO 10 0
Amplion, A.C.9 £9 9 Q
Deposit, 11/;
Deposit, 13/;
Deposit, 7/;
Deposit, 7/;
Deposit, 11/;
Deposit, 17/6;
Deposit, 1 0/;
Deposit, 15/6;
Depiosit, 15/6;
Deposit, 13/;
Deposit, 10/6;
Deposit, £l/4/6;
Deposit, £l/9/6;
Deposit, £ 1 /6/3;
Deposit, £l/1 1/6;
Deposit, £ 1/6/3;
Deposit, £l/5/i
Weekly Funds, 5/6
Weekly Funds, 6/6
Weekly Funds, 3/6
Weekly Funds, 3/6
Weekly Funds, 5/6
Weekly Funds, 8/9
Weekly Funds, 5/
Weekly Funds, 7/9
Weekly Funds* 7/9
Weekly Funds, 6/6
Weekly Funds, 5/3
Weekly Funds, 3/8
Weekly Funds, 4/5
Weekly Funds, 3/ 1 !
Weekly Funds, 4/8
Weekly Funds, 3/11
Weekly Funds, 3/7
19
19
19
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P.23 – Proving Radio! (2)[edit]

PROVING
RADIO!
No. 2. This text, the second oj
the collection on elementary
radio ideas, offers with easy
types of electrical energy, how you can create
or harness it, and how you can check its
polarity. Nothing might be less complicated
than the experiments detailed beneath.
IN LAST ISSUE we mentioned static elec-
tricity, and carried out a number of fascinating
experiments, proving the presence of
static electrical energy. We learnt that electrical energy
generated by friction is known as static, or fric-
tional electrical energy.
Now we come to the electroscope, which is
a easy little machine for exhibiting whether or not a
physique is galvanized or not, a,nd whether it is, whether or not
it’s positively or negatively electrified.
To make an electroscope get a bottle with
a large mouth (resembling a big pickle bottle),
and match a cork into it. Bend a bit of
wire within the form proven in Fig. 1, and spherical
off each ends with a file. This executed, push
the straight finish by the centre of the
cork, and lay a strip of tissue paper 4-inch
FIG 1. —THE ELECTROSCOPE.
vast and one inch lengthy throughout the bent ena.
Push the cork into the neckof the bottle,
and the electroscope is prepared “to be used. By
utilizing gold tissue, or gold-leaf as an alternative of tis-
sue paper, the electroscope turns into a a lot
extra delicate instrument.
Any variety of fascinating experiments can
be made with a gold-leaf electroscope, and
listed below are a couple of examples:—
For our first experiment this week maintain
a bit of lump-sugar c r the electroscope,
and reduce it in two with a ack-saw. Because the
sugar mud falls on it the leaves will diverge
Subsequent take a dry violin bow; resin it properly;
then draw it evenly over the electroscope,
and the leaves will repel one another. After
this break a stick of sealing wax, and maintain
the damaged finish of one of many items shut
to the wire of the electroscope, when it can
present that electrical energy has been generated.
Then electrify the electroscope with a glass
rod that has been rubbed on silk. The leaves
will fly aside. Now electrify a stick of sealing
wax in the identical method, and produce it shut
to the wire, when the leaves will collapse.
It is because the adverse cost neutral-
ises the optimistic cost. The crystals of
many substances, resembling tartaric acid, bora-
cite, and tommaline, when heated, generate
electrical energy, and this may be proved by hold-
ing them near the rod of the electroscope.
Subsequent, make a small stool (you probably have a
comparable article it might be used) about one
foot sq., and help it on 4 sticks of
sealing-wax, every of which is 5 or 6 inches
lengthy. Varnish the stool throughout with shel-
lac. Then have any person stand on this
stool with a finger touching the wire of the
electroscope. Now, should you repeatedly strike
his coat with a dry silk handkerchief the
leaves will fly aside.
These are just a few of the experiments
that may be carried out with this easy piece
of equipment. You will see out many for
your self, however within the meantime we should cross
on to another fascinating equipment with
which we will have the ability to experiment.
One other fascinating piece of equipment is
the electrophorus. Although easy within the
excessive, the electrophorus has the capability
of producing a bigger quantity of static elec-
tricity than is feasible by merely rubbing
a rod, a cat, or a strip of paper. Volta de-
vised the electrophorus (pronounced e-lek-
tro-for-us), and that is one other easy scien-
tific piece of equipment that may be made.
Get two massive pie-pans, and fill considered one of
them with a melted compound fashioned of
equal elements of brown resin and shellac melt-
ed over a gradual fireplace. Whereas the wax is get-
ting laborious within the pan, warmth the tip of a
stick of sealing-wax, and fasten it to the
centre of the opposite pan to type a deal with.
Now get a bit of flannel about Ift. sq.,
and you’re able to experiment. See Fig.
2.
The pan containing the resin and shellac
combination is known as the only real, and the remaining
pan is the quilt. To generate electrical energy all
you need to do is to’ rub the combination of
the only real with the piece of flannel, which
ought to first be warmed, and you’ll then
have a adverse cost on it. Subsequent place
the quilt on the only real, however don’t let the
backside of the primary make contact with the
rim of the second.
For the reason that sole is charged with adverse
electrical energy, the quilt can be charged with
a like quantity of optimistic electrical energy by in-
duction. As there are occasional factors
of contact between them, the quilt additionally
takes on a cost of adverse electrical energy
from the only real. Earlier than the optimistic cost
of the quilt can be utilized, subsequently, you
should eliminate the adverse cost that
FIG. 2 .—THE ELECTROPHORUS.
it has picked up, and that is executed merely
by touching the pan along with your finger simply
earlier than you raise it from the only real, when the
adverse cost will cross to earth by
your physique, and the quilt will retain its
optimistic cost. You’ve got now solely to
raise the quilt of the only real by the sealing-
wax deal with with one hand, and maintain the
knuckle of considered one of your fingers of the opposite
hand inside tain, of the sting of the quilt,
when you’re going to get a spark of ample
brightness that may be seen, and a shock
robust sufficient to make you’re feeling it. Now,
place the quilt on once more; eliminate the
adverse cost by touching it along with your
finger as earlier than; raise it up once more; place your
knuckle near the rim, and you’re going to get
one other spark. In reality, you may carry on
getting them for fairly some time earlier than it
can be essential to impress the combination
with the flannel once more. To get extra
highly effective shocks and sparks a Leyden jar
can be utilized.
FIG. 3.—THE LEYDEN JAR.
To make a Leyden jar coat a small
tumbler inside and outside with tin-foil. Be-
gin by drying the tumbler properly and coating
it inside and outside with a few of your shellac
varnish; then let this dry. Lower two strips
of tin-foil; then give the tumbler one other
coat of varnish, and earlier than it dries apply
the tin-foil in order that it sticks. The tin-
foil must be mounted inside and outside, and
there must be no air bubbles or tough
surfaces. Be sure that the within tin-foil
doesn’t make contact with the tin-foil
mounted outdoors the tumbler; in any other case a
short-circuit will happen, and the
costs can be neutralised.
Subsequent reduce out two discs of tin-foil and
press one on the underside inside, and one
on the underside outdoors of the tumbler. Match
a bit of wooden or a flat cork within the mouth
of the tumbler, and drill a %in. gap in
the centre of it. Solder one finish of a
piece of brass chain about 3in. lengthy to
one finish of a brass rod of the identical size,
and push the latter by the disc.
You’ve got solely to set the cork or wooden
disc within the tumbler mouth, and the Leyden
jar is full. See Fig. 3.
(Continued on Web page 48.)

In case you mild a candle, and, after burning
it for a couple of moments, put it out, then maintain
it in order that the wick can be just under the
rod of the Leyden jar and in entrance of the
discharger, a spark will cross which can
mild the candle. It is because there
is a heated column of fuel that’s given oil
by the wick, and which lights simply.
Now we will go away static electrical energy and
cross on to the strategies of manufacturing cur-
lease. Most of our experiments will re-
quire a present of electrical energy. This could
be obtained from a dynamo, if that is
out there, however, for the sake of those that
would care to make all the things as they go
alongside, we will describe some quite simple
cells which can be made for a couple of pence,
and that are fairly serviceable. The ma-
terials for these cells could be obtained with-
out bother.
As a aspect observe, you need to do not forget that
no battery composed of a single cell, whether or not
it’s as small as your finger, or as massive as
a home, can ship greater than 11-2 volts.
If a larger voltage is desired various
these cells must be related in collection,
whereas if the identical voltage however a larger am-
perage, is required various them ought to
be related in parallel.
To make the cell procure loz. of sal-
ammoniac (ammonium chloride). This could
be obtained from any chemist. Place it in
a glass about three-quarters filled with water,
and stir till the sal-ammoniac is completely
dissolved. Get a rod of zinc and considered one of
carbon about 4in. lengthy (B.G.E. appeared to be
the one agency that might provide the latter
merchandise), and twist the tip of a protracted copper
wire, which you may have scraped completely clear
FIG. 4. —A SIMPLE CELL.
spherical one finish of every rod. This executed, reduce
a bit of previous ebonite or different insulating
materials massive sufficient to cowl the highest of
the glass, and within the ebonite make two holes
about one inch aside, and push within the zinc
and carbon rods, with the be part of uppermost.
tFig. 4.)
The answer you may have made is known as the
electrolyte. The zinc rod is your adverse
battery lead, while the carbon is optimistic.
Straight you shut the circuit, that’s, con-
nect the 2 wires collectively, both immediately
or by an instrument, the cell will com-
mence to generate a present. The cell could be
made extra highly effective by pouring very slowly
loz. of sulphuric acid int othe electrolyte, and
stirring it with a glass rod. In case you use this
cell ensure that to take the 2 poles out
as quickly as you may have completed, as in any other case
they are going to be eaten away.
In subsequent problem we will describe the con-
struction of higher cells, each moist and dry,
and a technique can be proven whereby energy
from the mains could also be used. We will
additionally produce a bathe of electrical sparks—
shall style electrical energy, make a present tester
and polarity indicator, decompose water,
make a water resistance, and make a flash-
mild telegraph.
In case you make a discharger, that’s, a
piece of wire so bent that it’ll make con-
tact with the surface tin-foil, and likewise the
wire, there can be a flash and a crack, and
right here we have now manufactured from static
electrical energy a small pattern of thunder and
lightning. It’s advisable to so bend the
discharger {that a} deal with of wooden could also be
put upon it.
If, as an alternative of fully coating the within
of the jar, it’s lined with items of tin-
foil reduce in diamond form, and the surface
handled likewise, it is going to be seen that the
jar is crammed with sparks while it’s being
charged and discharged. The gap be-
tween the diamond items should be very
small, as in any other case, owing to the small
quantity of present out there, no motion will
happen.

P.24 – Liverpool Electrical Cable Co Advert[edit]

Higher Reception with These
Lewcos comes positively to management within the manufacturing of those three
merchandise, designed to provide you higher reception. See them at your
sellers—study them for yourslf. Notice their high-quality factors of
building
YOU NEED THESE LEWCOS PRODUCTS.
LEWCOS WAVETRAP
Operates successfully— cuts out
interference immediately. May be
used with any broadcast re-
ceiver merely by inserting in
the aerial circuit.
PRACTICAL PROOF.
Mr. F. J. Harrison, of Messrs
Bradley Bros., Ltd., writes:—
“I put in your Lewcos Wave
lure in about three minutes, and
the impact vfras fantastic. 2BL
and 3LO had been utterly sep
arated I can most con
fidently suggest this lure
to anybody to be used bn any set
and shall be happy to demon
state to anybody .”
YOU CAN GET THE SAME
RESULTS WITH A LEWCOS
WAVETRAP.
PRICE, 25/-.
£
m
LEWCOS
HIGH
FREQUENCY
CHOKE
This prevents instability of the
audio amplifier, stops howling,
and clears up reception. The
Lewcos H. F. choke is particu
larly really useful to be used with
screened grid receivers. Could also be
fitted simply to your present
broadcast receiver.
PRICE, 12/6.
LEWCOS SHORT WAVE
COILS
Consultants are filled with reward for
these newest coils, that are de-
signed for contemporary brief wave
receivers. They’re significantly
environment friendly, as a result of the secondary
is wound with silk insulated
copper strip, thus decreasing
losses to a minimal The
ribbed building of the
former is actually of low loss
design. These coils are of es
pecially strong construct, and may
be dealt with with out worry of
damaging.
PRICE, 15/-.
BASE, 3/6 further.
LEWCOS PRODUCTS OBTAINABLE ALL GOOD RADIO DEALERS
The Liverpool Electrical Cable Co. Ltd
In Conjunction with their Related Firm
IONPON ELECTRIC WOECMMITIISE
LEWCOS HOUSE, 233 CLARENCE ST, SYDNEY
Telephones SmJ gg

P.25 – Native Programmes, January 4[edit]

Native Programmes , Friday, January 4
2FC SERVICE
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Coclnane.
7.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
7.2 a.m.: Official climate forecast, rainfau,
river studies, temperatures, astronomical
memoranda.
7.7 a.m.: “Sydney Morning f erald” sum
mary.
7.12 a.m.: Transport intelligence, mail ser-
vices.
7.15 a.m.: Studio music.
7.25 a.m.: Funding market, mining share-
markets, steel quotations, wool gross sales,
breadstuffs markets, inter-State markets,
produce markets.
7.40 a.m.: Studio music.
8.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben.” Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
10.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte copy.
10.10 a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information
service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music,
10.45 a.m.: A chat on “Residence Cooking and
Recipes,” by Miss Ruth Furst.
11.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben.” A.P.A. and Reuter’s
cable companies.
11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
12.Zero midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
12.1 p.m.: Inventory Trade, first name.
12.Three p.m.: Official climate forecast, rainfah
12.5 p.m.: Studio music.
12.10 ’ p.m.: Abstract of reports, “Sydney
Morning Herald.”
12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
12.18 p.m.: A studying.
12.30 p.m.: Studio music.
12.45 p.m.: Cricket scores, third Check matcn.
England v. Australia, performed at Melbourne.
12.47 p.m.: Studio music.
1.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Climate intelligence.
1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” noon information ser-
vice. Producers’ Distributing Society’s re-
port.
1.20 p.m.: Studio music.
1.28 p.m.: Inventory Trade, second name.
1.30 p.m.. Common studio music.
1.57 plm.: Cricket scores.
2.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32 p.m.: Recital of chosen data of
world-famous artists.
3.Zero p.m.: ‘ Massive Ben.” Pianoforte reproduc
tion.
3.17 p.m.: Elsie Waller (contralto).
3.23 p.m.: Betty Armstrong (soprano).
3.30 p.m. From the Wentworth.
The Wentworth Cafe Dance Orchestra,
below the path of Jimmy Elkins.
3.40 p.m.: From the studio.
William Krasnik (violinist).
3.45 p.m.: Cricket scores.
3.46 p.m.: A studying.
4.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Betty Armstrong
(soprano).
4.7 p.m.: William Krasnik (vicimist). v
4.14 p.m : Elsie Waller (contrailc).
4.21 p.m.: From the Wentworth.
The Wentworth Cafe Dance Orchestra,
below the path of Jimmy Elkins.
4.30 p.m.: From the studio. Cricket ssore-s
4.32 p.m.: Common studio music
4.45 p.m.: Third name, Inventory Trade.
4.47 p.m.: Studio music.
5.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC
5.45 p.m.: The youngsters’s session, conductf.’-
by the “Whats up Man. 2
Letters and tales.
Music and leisure.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market report (woo 1 ,
wheat, and inventory).
6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6.43 p.m.- Inventory Trade info.
6.45 p.m.: Climate and delivery information.
6.48 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information
6.50 p.m : Late sporting information, instructed by the
2FC Racing Commissioner.
7.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Late information service.
7.10 p.m.- Particular file recital
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.47 p.m.: Pianoforte copy.
7.52 p.m.: Cricket resume for nation listen-
ers, third Check match, England v. Austra-
INDEX TO 2FC
AND
2BL PROGRAMMES
Friday, January 4 25
Saturday, January 5 28
Sunday, January 6 82
Monday, January 7 …. 34
Tuesday, January 8 . 36
Wednesday, January .9 39
Thursday, January 10 42
lia, performed at Melbourne.
7.54 p.m.: Popihar music.
8.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” By courtesy of J. C.
Williamson, Ltd., a transmission from one
of Sydney’s main theatres can be ar-
ranged.
9.10 p.m : From the studio, weatner report.
9.11 p.m.: The Gentle Music 4.
9.25 p.m.: Len Maurice and Franc Rousel, the
Melody.”
9.30 p.m.: Cliff Arnold in “Fragments of
Melody.”
9.40 p.m.: The Gentle Music 4.
10.Zero p.m.: ’Massive Ben.” Len Maurice an i
Franc Rousel, the melodists.
10.5 p.m.: Cliff Arnold in “Fragments of
Melody.” ?
10.15 p.m.: Len Maurice and Franc Rousel,
the melodists.
10.20 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.
2BL SERVICE
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
8.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Metropolitan climate report.
8.1 a.m.: State climate report.
8.2 a.m.r Studio music.
8.15 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Information from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.”
8.25 a.m.: Studio music.
8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Studio music.
8.35 a.m.: Data; mails; delivery, ar-
rivals, departures, and sailings.
8.38 a.m.: Information from the “Day by day Telegraph
Pictorial.”
8. “45 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Studio music.
9.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Studio music.
9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with silent pals.
10.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
MID-DAY SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
2BL Ladies’s Sports activities Affiliation session,
carried out by Miss Gwen Varley.
11.30 a.m.: Promoting hints.
11.40 a.m.: Ladies’s session, carried out by
Mrs. Cranfield.
12.Zero Midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
12.Three p.m.: Pianoforte copy.
12.30 p.m.: Transport and mails.
12.35 p.m.: Market studies.
12.45 p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. New-
citadel, performed at Newcastle.
12.48 p.m.: “Solar” mid-day information service.
1.Zero p.m.: Studio music.
1.30 p.m.: Discuss to kids, and particular en-
tertainment for kids in hospital.
1.57 p.m.: Cricket scores.
2.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
From the New South Wales Garden Tennis
Floor, description of the worldwide
tennis, British Isles v. Australia. This
can be continued all through the afternoon,
returning at intervals between play to the
studio for fashionable music.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session—
Music and leisure.
6.Zero p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: Particular dinner music recital.
7.10 p.m.: Cricket scores.
7.12 p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s report.
Climate report and forecast, by courtesy
of Authorities Meteorologist.
Producers’ Distributing Society’s Fruit and
Vegetable Market report.
Grain and fodder report (“Solar”).
Dairy produce report (“Solar”).
7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam, in adver-
tising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION ,
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
From the Lyric Wintergarden Theatre—
The Lyric Wintergarden Theatre Orches-
tra, carried out by Horace Watts.
8.20 p.m.: From the Studio—
“ The 5 Vibrant Spirits” reside as much as their
status.
8.50 p.m.: The Savoyans Dance Band.
9. p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Norman Wright, tenor.
9.7 p.m.: C. R. Dexter will give last-minute
racing info.
9.22 p.m.: The 5 Vibrant Spirits, in music
and mime.
9.52 p.m.: The Savoyans Dance Band.
10.2 p.m.: Norman Wright, tenor.
10.9 p.m.: From the Lyric Wintergarden
Theatre—The Lyric Wintergarden Theatre
Orchestra, carried out by Horace Watts.
10.20 p.m.: From the Studio—
The'”Savoyans Dance Band.
10.30 p.m.: Late climate and announce-
ments.
10.32 p.m.: The SavoyanS Dance Band.
10.57 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.

P.26 – Interstate Programmes , Friday, January 4[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Friday, January 4
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.IS a.m.: Morning
melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workout routines to music.
7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies. Market studies. Gene-
ral information. Transport. Sporting info. 8.0
a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time sign. 8.1
а. Morning melodies. 8.15 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: .John Stuart.)
11.Zero a.m.: 3LO’s completely different dainties for the every day
dinner. To-day’s radio recipe, cherrv or plum
fruit cup. 11.5 a.m.: Mrs. Dorothy Silk will
communicate on “Homecrafts.” 11.20 a.m.: Musical in-
terlude. 11.25 a.m.: “Au Fait” will communicate on
“Fashions.” 11.40: Musical interlude. 11.45 a.m.:
Sister Purcell will communicate on “Toddler Welfare.”
MIDDAY SESSlON.—(Announcer: John Stuart.)
12.Zero midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign.
12.1 p.m.: Costs acquired by the Australian Mines
and Metals Affiliation from the London Inventory
Trade this present day. British official wi-fi information
from Rugby. Reuter’s and the Australian Press
Affiliation Cables. “Argus” information – service. 12.15
p.m.: Newmarket inventory gross sales. Particular report by
John M’Namara and Co. 12.20 p.m.: The station
orchestra. “An Arcadian Pageant” (Rikett).
12.30 p.m.: Syd. Hollister (comic) will amuse
you for awhile. 12.37 p.m.: Inventory Trade in-
formation. 12.40 p.m.: The Station orchestra.
“Triumphzug” (Donizetti). 12.50 p.m.: ’ j’ames
Lloyd (tenor). “Eleanore” (Coleridge-Taylor).
“Madelina” (W. G. James.) 12.57 p.m.: Percy
Code (trumpet). “My Goals” (Tosti). 1.Four p.m.:
The station orchestra. “Merry Andrew” (Ire-
land). “Berceuse” (Jarnfelt). 1.1 l p.m.: Meteo-
rological info. Climate forecast for Vic-
toria, New South Wales, Tasmania, and South
Australia. Ocean forecasts, river studies. 1.18
p.m.: James Lloyd (tenor). “Syl.evin’s Music”
(Sinding). “I Hear a Thrush at Eve” (Cadmain.
1.25 p.m.: The station orchestra. “Pierrot”
(Speciak). “Pale Moon” (Logan). j. 37 p.m.:
Syd. Holiister (comic). “The Humorous Aspect.”
1.45 p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSlON—
(Announcer: John Stuart.) Accompanist: Agnes
Fortune.) 2.15 p.m.: The Strad Trio. “Op. 15 in
F Main” (Rubinstein). Con moto modsrato.
Moderato. Finale. 2.33 p.m.: Senia Cho tiakoff
(tenor). “The Snowflakes” (Varlamoff). “A Rus-
sian People Music.” 2.40 p.m.: Cecil Parkes (vio-
lin). “Menuett” (Haydn).. “Tambourin’’ (Gos-
• sec.) “Gavotte” (Bach). 2.47 p.m.: Millie
M’Cormack (mezzo-soprano). “The Lorelei”
(Liszt). .“The Useless Swimsuit” (Brahms). 2.54 p.m.:
The Strad Trio. “Air” (Bach-Parkes). “Span-
ish Dance No. 2,” “Melody” (Moszkows^i). “Three
Fours Waltz” (Coleridge-Taylor). 3.7 p.m.- Fran-
ces Fraser will communicate on “Kipling and. Eng-
land.” 3.22 p.m.: The station orchestra. Phan-
tasy, “The Egocentric Large” (Coates). 3.32 p.m.:
Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief re-
cital. 3.39 p.m.: Senia Chostiakoff (tenor),
“Gipsy Music” (Donauroff). “Star Vicino” (Salva-
tor Rosa). 3.46 p.m.: Viva Holgate Clarke,
“Sonata in A” (Mozart). Theme and Variations.
Menuetto and Trio. Alla turca. 4.Zero p.m.: The
station orchestra. Fantasia, “Heldenbach” (Wag-
ner). 4.10 p.m.: Millie M’Cormack (mezzo-so-
prano). “Le Roi D’ys” (Massenet). “The Month
of April” (Bantock). 4.17 p.m.: Guildford Bishop
(violin). “Chanson de Nuit” (Elgar). “Po’onime”
(Ten Have). 4.24 p.m.: The :!tetion orchestra.
Songs from Eliland” (von Fiejitz). “Alabama”
(Spalding). 4.34 p.m.: Keith Desmond (elocution-
ist) will give a brief recital. 4.41 p.m.: The
station orchestra. Fantasia, “In Zeichen” (Suppe).
4.51 p.m.: The station trio. “Trio” (Berensi.
б. p.m.: “Herald” information service. Inventory Trade
info. 5.10 p.m.: Shut down. Throughout the
afternoon progress scores of the Sheffield Protect
cricket match. New South Wales v. Queensland,
at Sydney, can be given as they arrive handy.
EVENING SESSION.— (Announcer: Frank Hather-
ley.) 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday
greetings, by “Bobby Bluegum.” 6.25 p.m.: Musi-
cal interlude. 6.30 p.m.: Captain Donald Mac-
lean will inform one other story about these pertina-
cious pirates. NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer: C.
J. O’Connor. Accompanyte: Agnes Fortune.) 6.50
p.m.: Madame Soward. “French With out Tears.”
7.5 p.m,: Inventory Trade info. 7.15 ’ n.pi.:
Particular report by John M’Namara and Co. Official
report of the Newmarket inventory gross sales bv the
Related Inventory and Station Brokers, Bourke
Avenue, Melbourne. Fish market studies by J. R.
Borrett, Ltd. Rabbit costs. River studies. Mar-
ket studies by the Victorian Producers’ Co-opera-
tive Firm, Ltd. Poultry, grain, hay, straw,
jute, dairy produce, potatoes and onions. Market
studies of fruit by the V’etorian Fruiterers’ Asso-
ciation. Retail costs. Wholesale costs of fruit
by the Wholesale Fruit Retailers’ Affiliation.
Citrus fruits. 7.30 p.m.: Information session. 7.43 n.m.:
Birthday greetings. 7.45 p.m.: Out of the Previous.
7.46 p.m.: . Howiett Ross will communicate on “Brunton
Stephens ana his Work.” 8.Zero p.m.: H. Okay. Love
Will communicate on “Technicalities.” 8.10 p.m.: Col-
lingwood Residents’ Band. March, “With Sword
finish Lance.” Cornet solo, “Flower Music,” from
“Faust.” 8.20 p.m.: James A. Fraser (baritone).
“Lorraine, Lorraine, Loree” (Speaks). “Ay! Ay!
Ay!” (Spanish serenade) (Freire). 8.27 p.m.: Col-
lingwood Residents’ Band. Intermezzo, “Rendez-
vous.” 8.34 p.m.: Violet ackson (soprano).
“Moonlight” (Schumann). “The Lotus Flower”
(Schumann). 8.41 p.m.: Collingwood Residents’
Band. Choice. “Veronique.” 8.45 p.m.: Viva
Holgate Clarke, “Prelude and Fugue in C ilinpr”
(Bach). “Fantasie Op. 49” (Chopin). 9.Zero p.m.:
Captain Donald Mac Lean will proceed his collection
of “Pirate” tales. 9.15 p.m.: Collingwood Citi-
zens’ Band. Japanese romance, “Poppies.” 9.25
p.m.: Tom Masters and Jam&s A. Fraser (tenor
and barit9ne), duets, “Stream Gently Leva”
(Parry). “Passing By” (Purcell). 9.32 p.m.:
Marion Lightfoot (banjo), “Queen of the Bur-
lesque.’” “Longwood Polka.” 9.30 p.m.: Syd.
Hollister icomedian) will drive uninteresting care away.
9.46 n.m.: Collingwood Residents’ Band. Waltz,
“Thrills.” 9.50 p.m.: Eric Welch will communicate on
to-morrow’s races at Sandown Park. 10.Zero p.m.:
Collingwood Residents’ Band. Serenade. “Moon-
mild”. 10.7 p;m.: Tom Masters (tenor). “When
•My Ships Come Crusing Residence” (Doree), “Molly
Pricey” (Gould). 10.14 p.m.: The Radi-o-Acus.
“Sally R-o (Pal). “Sincerely I Do”
Davis). “The Prune S o ng” (Crumit). 1.24
p.m.: Syd. Holjister (comic), “Extra Hol-
listepisms.” 10.31 p.m.: “Argus’” information
service. British official wi-fi information from Rugby.
Meteorological info.! Street notes provided
by the Royal Car Membership of Victoria. An-
nouncements. Weekly seasonable gardening re-
minders. compiled by Leslie Drunning. 10.41 p.m.:
Marion Lightfoot (banjo). “Rugby Parade.” “On
the Mill Dam.” 10.48 p.rp.: Violet Jackson (so-
prano). “Cabbage looses” (Daisy M’Geoch). “The
Dandelion” (Daisy M’Geoch). 10.55 p.m.: Col-
Imgwood Residents’ Band. Serenade, “Moonlight.”
11.Zero p.m.: Our nice thought for to-day. 11.1 p.m.:
The Radi-o-Acer-. “Sleepy Child” (Kahn). “Get
Out and Get Below the Moon” (Tobias). “That’s
Mv Weak spot Now” (Stept). “Tiger Rag” (Moore).
‘Dream Home” (Fox). “Jeannine” (Gilbert).
“Brainstorm’? (Sanders). “Pay Goals” (Hal-
lam). “Mississippi Mud” (Harris). “Ups and
Downs” (Rose), i 1.40 p.m.: God Save the King.

Index to Inter-State
Programmes
(SLO , 3AR , 4()G, SCL).
Friday, January J t gf;
Saturday, January 5 30
Sunday, January 6 33
Monday, January 7 33
Tuesday, January 8 38
Wednesday, January 0
TJiursflay, January 10

4QG
SESSION.— (Announcer: J. Ty-
srrvicp Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information
service. 8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical data. 8.15
a.m.. Information service. 8.30 a.m.- ciosp Hr>wn
SESSION.— (Announcer: Con Archdall.)
I 1 ; 0 . h m -; H. 5 a.m.: Social information. 11.15
Lecturette—A cookery and family speak by
The Etiquette Lady.” 11.30 a.m.: Music. 11 35
MPl’e sQcial information. 11.45 a.m.: Music. 12.0
Midday. Shut down. MID-DAY SESSlON.—(An-
wpiri?’ 10 P-m.: #Market studies
and weatner info. 1.20 p.m.: From the
P«ns Cafe—Lunch-hour music. 2.Zero p.m.- Shut
down. AFTERNOON SESSION.—3.3O p.m.: Mail
tram operating instances. A programme of electrically
reproduced data. 4.Zero p.m.: From the Tivoli
Theatre—Orchestral music. 4.15 p.m.: This after-
midday s information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down EARLV
EVENING SESSION.—-(Announcers: R Wight and
H. Humphreys.) 6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating
instances; mail info; delivery information. 6.5 p.m.:
Dinner music. 6.25 p.m.: Business announce-
nients. 6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, carried out by
The Sandman.” 7.Zero p.m.: Information in short. 7 5
p.m.: Inventory Trade information. 7.6 p.m.: Steel quo-
tations. 7.7 p.m.: Market studies. 7.25 p.m ■
I’enwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate in-
formation. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins. 7.43 p.m •
Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: To-morrow’s
sporting fixtures ‘reviewed. NIGHT SESSION.—
(Announcer: H. Humphreys.) 8.Zero p.m.: The Studio
Orpheans (Conductor, T. Muller)—Refrain, “Froth
Blowers’ Anthem,” accompanied by the Studio
Orchestra. The Studio Orchestra (Conductor, A.
R. Featherstone), fox-trot, “Raggin’ By way of the
Rye (Adams), with vocal chorus by the Or-
pheans George Williamson (tenor), “Coming
Residence (Wilieby). Tom Muller (elocutionist),
Gunga Din” (Kipling). Helep Publish-Mason, as-
sisted by the Orpheans, will clarify the way it feels
to be “Lonely.” The Orpheans, “Mary Lou.” Fred
Crane (baritone), “Tuck Me To Sleep” (Meyer),
accompanied by the Studio Orchestra. The Studio
Orchestra, waltz, “Over the Waves.” Helen Publish-
Mason (soubretfe), “My Mammy” (Donaldson),, as-
sisted by the Orpheans and the Studio Orchestra.
The Orpheans, “Previous Kentucky Residence” (Soloist,
■I P. Cornwell). The Studio Orchestra, choice
“Belle of New York” (Kerkel). The Orpheans—
Across the pianola for 5 minutes’, with a bunch
of previous favprites, together with “Candy Rosie O’Grady,”
“The Sidewalks of New York,” “After the Ball,”
“Annie Rooney,” “Two Little Women in Blue,” “A
Bicycle Constructed for Two.” 9.Zero p.m.: Metropolitan
climate forecast. 9.1 p.m.: The Studio Orchestra,
“Wanting on the World By way of Rose Coloured
Glasses” (with vocal chorus by the Orpheans).
George Williamson (tenor), “Sally Horner.” Helen
Publish-Mason, assisted by the Orpheans, yull inform
what occurs if you maintain “Smilin’.” Ernest
Harper (baritone), “I’d Like to Pall Asleep” (Ah-
lert). The Orpheans, Refrain, “Candy Genevieve.”
Radio interlude, “Hymns of the Previous Church’ Choir”
—Previous Man (T. Muller), Verger (H. Humphreys).
Ray Bruce (tenor), ‘’Little Brown Jug.” The Studio
Orchestra, “Medley of Previous Favorites,” No. 1. The
Orpheans, “Swannee River,” “Good Previous Jeff:”
Ernest Muller (tenor), “Received’t You Purchase My Fairly
Flowers?” The Studio Orchestra, “Medley of Previous
Favorites.” No. 2. The Orpheans, Last Quantity,
“Present Me the Manner To Go Residence.” 10.Zero p.m.:
The “Day by day Mail” information, The “Courier” information,
climate information. Shut down.
5CL
MORNING SESSION. — (Announcer: Athol Lykke.)
11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 11.1: Musical interlude
on the Sonora, Columbia recordings. Court docket Sym-
phony Orchestra, Rubinstein’s “Melody in F,”
“In a Monastery Backyard”; Maria Barrientos, so-
prano, “The Final Rose of Summer time,” “Voci di
Primavera” (Strauss). 11.15 a.m.: “Economist,”
kitchen craft and menu speak. 11.30 a.m.: Sonora
recital of dance music, Columbia recordings. Denza
Dance Band, “Shaking the Blues Away,” “So
Blue,” “Dancing Tambourine”; Ted Lewis and His
Band, “Poor Papa,” “Whereas We Danced Until
Daybreak”; Irana Troubadours, “Dream Kisses,”
“The place is My Meyer’”: Paul Ash and His Orches-
tra. “She’s Obtained It,” “What Does It Matter?”; the
Columbians Dance Band, “Anyone Lied About
Me,” “Rose of the Land”; Howard Lanin and His
Orchestra, “Fortunate Day,” “My Coronary heart Stood Nonetheless”;
The Radiolites, “That’s My Mammy.” 12.15 p.m.;
The “Advertiser” basic information service. 12.35 p.m.:
British Official wi-fi information. 12.40 p.m.; Inter-
lude of grand opera numbers. Enzo de Muro La-
manto. tenor. “Tacea la Notte Placida,” from “II
Trovatore”; Lina Scavizzi, soprano, “Vissi d’Arte,”
from “Tosca” (Puccini). 12.50 p.m.: S.A. railway
info. 12.51 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s
Inventory Trade info. 12.57 p.m.: Meteor-
ological info. 1.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 1.1
p.m.: An organ recital by Herbert Edwards. L.A.8.,
from Archer Avenue Methodist Church, “Suite
Gothique” (Boellman), “Sanctuary of the Coronary heart”
(Ketelby), “Marriage ceremony March” (Boss!), “Evensong”
(Martin). 1.20 p.m.: Florence Rendall, soprano,
“Love’s Backyard of Roses.” “The Little Brown
Owl.” 1.26 p.m.: George Whittle, entertainer, in
a humorous interlude. 1.32 p.m.: Florence Ren-
dall, soprano, “Down within the Forest.” “Love’s Previous
Candy Music.” 1.38 p.m.: George Whittle, enter-
tainer,. in a humorous interlude. 1.44 p.m..: Con-
clusion of organ recital bv Herbert Edwards. L.A.8.,
“Pastoral Sonata” (Rheinberger), “Fountain
Melody” (Neale), from Archer Avenue Methodist
Church. 1.59 p.m.: Meteorological info.
2.Zero n.m.: G.P.O. chimes and shut down. AFTER-
NOON SESSION.—3.O p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 3.1
n.m.: A recital on the Sonora, Columbia recordings.
Lionel Tertis, viola, with piano, “Sonata in A
Main.” half 1 Allegro Molto, half 2 “Theme with
Variations;” Alexander Kipnis, bass, “Am Meer”
(Schubert). “Der Lindenbaum” (Schubert); the
Halle Orchestra, “Damnation of Faust,” “Rakoczy
Ma’-ch” (Berlioz). “Damnation of Faust,” “Dance
of the Sylphes” (Berlioz); Maria Kurenko, soprano.
“La Boheme,” “Mi Chiamano Mimi” (PucCini), “II
Bacio” (The Kiss) (Arditi); Gaspar Cassado, ’cello,
“Menuett” (Haydn). “Chanson Villageoise. No. 2”
(Poo r ‘erl; Alfred O’Shea, tenor. “Little City in
the Ould Nation Down” (Pascoe), “Macushls”
(MacMurrough). Musical interlude. 3.40 p.ss.:
Diana, Belmont, contralto. “Over the Steppe,”.
“Softly Awakes My Coronary heart” (Saint-Saens). 3.46
n.m.: French Bros., banjoists, “The Solar. Will Shine
Once more” (Sevene). “Camille” ‘O’Hagan;. 3.52
p.m.; Hartley Williams, violinist. “Il Trovatore”
(Hanly). “I Heard You Sinewing” (Coates). 3.58
pm.: artley Williams, violinist, “II Trovatore”
(Verdi). 4.Four p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “Meli-
sande within the Wooden” (Goetz). “When Maiden
Loves” (Yeoman). 4.10, p.m.: Edith Piper, pian-
iste, “Intermezzo.” “Nightingale Waltz,” “The
Church on the Hill” (authentic compositions by Mr.
H. Brewster-Jones). 4.20 p.m.: Diana Belmont,
contralto. “Truthful Spring is Returning” (Saint-
Saens). “O Love. From Thy Energy” (Saint-Saens).-
<4.26 p.m.: French Bros., instrumentalists, “As a result of Mv Babv Don’t Imply Perhaps Now,” “In a Bamboo Backyard.” 4.32 p.m.: Denis Sheard, tenor, “Passing By (Purcell). “Provence” (Carne). 4.38 p.m.: Hartley Williams, violinist, “Romance” (Wieniaw- ski). “Gavotte” (Gossec). 4.44 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “My Activity” (Ashford), “Fleurette” (M'Geoch). 4.50 p.m.: Edith Piper, pianiste “The Little Shepherd” (Debussy), “The Backyard Below Rome’ (Debussy). 4.59 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade info. 5.Zero p.m- GPO chimes and shut down. EVENING SESSION.— (Announcer: J. L. Norris.) 6.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. ®.l P- m - : Kids’s completely happy moments; birthday greetings, correspondence, ' songs and tales by “Miss Wi-fi.” 6.30 p.m.: Music in- terluae of dinner music, Columbia recordings on the Sonora. 6.55 p.m.: Stump scores of cricket N.S.W. v. Queensland. 7.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 7.1 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade info. 7.5 p.m.: Basic market studies. 7.Eight p.m.: 5CL’s sporting service, by “Siivius ” 7 20 p.m.: “Willow” will give a resume on the cricket. 7.30 p.m.: A Sonora recital, Columbia recordings. Sascha Jacobsen, violinist. “On the Brook” (D° Boisdeffre), “Chant Neere” (Kramer); Albert W‘. Keteibey s Live performance Orchestra, “In a Monastery Backyard,” “In a Persian Market,” “Sanctuary of

the Coronary heart,” “Bells Throughout the Meadow.” 7.45 p.m.:
Mr. P. H. Nicholls will communicate on “A Month with
Shakespeare,” introduction. NIGHT SESSION.—
8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 8.1: Magill Vice-Regal
Band, quickstep “Holyrood,” Scotch overture “The
Truthful Maid of Perth.” 8.13 p.m.: Diana Belmont,
contralto, “The Ships of Arcady,” “Beloved.” 8.20
p.m.: French Bros., banjoists, “Let a Smile Be
Your Umbrella,” “Simply Like a Melody.” 8.26 p.m.:
George Horton, humorist, in comedy sketches.
8.32 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band, choice, “A
Day on the Farm.” 8.42 p.m.: Gertrude Grey,
mezzo, “The Coronary heart Worships,” “Pierrot.” 8.48
p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band, “Take within the Solar,
Grasp Out the Moon.” 8.54 p.m.: Eric Wickens,
bass, choice from his repertoire. 9.Zero p.m.:
G.P.O. chimes. 9.1 p.m.: Meteorological informa-
tion. 9.2 p.m.: Abroad grain report. 9.Three p.m.:
Diana Belmont, contralto. “A Blackbird Singing,”
“Nocturne.” 9.9 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band,
cornet duet, “Ida and Dot.” 9.19 p.m.: George
Horton, comic, in comedy sketches. 9.25 p.m.:
Magill Vice-Regal Band, “The Warblers’ Serenade.”
9.35 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “I Try from
Ldve’s Illness” (Purcell), “Since First I Noticed
Your Face.” 9.41 p.m.: French Bros., “Marcelle”
(Stoneham). “Mellow Mersey Moon” (Stoneham).
9.45 p.m.: Eric Wickens, bass, alternatives from his
repertoire. 9.51 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band,
waltz “Jeanine. I Dream of Lilac Time.” 10.0
p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 10.1 p.m.: George Horton,
humorist, in comedy sketches. 10.7 p.m.: Magill
Vice-Regal Band, “Cavalry of the Clouds.” 10.15
p.m.: The “Advertiser” basic information service. 10.20
p.m.: 5CL’s sporting service, by “Silvius.” 10.30
p.m.: Meteorological info. 10.31 p.m.: Our
good-night thought. 10.30 p.m.: By , courtesy of
3LO, Melbourne, trendy dance numbers by’ the
well-known Radi-o-Aces. 11.10 p.m.: “God Save the
King.”
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSlON.—(Announcer: Jack Broad-
bent.) 11.30 a.m.: Monsieur Sonora, musical se-
lections. 11.34 a.m.: Climate info. 11.35
a.m.: Monsieur Sonora, musical alternatives. 11.55
a.m.: Tasmanian’stations’ 9 a.m. climate report.
12.Zero midday: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 12.1
pm.: Transport info Ships inside wire-
much less vary. Mail notices. Housewives’ information. 12.8
p.m.: Monsieur Sonora, musical alternatives. 12.11
p.m.: British official wi-fi information. 12.20 p.m.:
Monsieur Sonora, musical alternatives. 12.29 p.m.:
Bulletins. 12.33 p.m.: Monsieur Sonora,
musical alternatives. 12.55 p.m.: “Mercury” information
service. Produce gross sales held at Railway. 1.10 p.m.:
Monsieur Sonora, musical alternatives.. 1.30 p.m.:
Shut down., AFTERNOON SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Jack Broadbent.) 3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes
the hour. 3.1 p.m.: Monsieur Sonora, musical
alternatives. 3.Four p.m.: Climate info 3.5
p.m. – Monsieur Sonora, musical alternatives. 3.15
om.: A live performance by the Grasp Musicians. Jacques
Jacob’s Ensemble “Espana” (WaldteufeJ), waltz,
“I’Estudiantia” (Waldteufel); Muriel Brunskill,
contralto, “O Pretty Night time” (Tschemacher),
“Kathleen Mavourneen” (Crawford); J, H. Squire
Celeste, octet, piano concerto, “Reminiscences of Tschai-
kowsky,” “1812” overture, elements 1 and a couple of (Arr
Sear); Signor Lenghi-Ceilini, tenor, “Marie, My
Lady” (Aiken), “I hear you calling me” (Mar-
shall); Eddie Thomas’ Collegians, waltz, “Ohio”
(Earl); Columbia Orchestra, march, “March of the
Toys” (Herbert), duet. Dame Clara Butt and Ken-
nerley Rumford, “The Keys of Heaven” (Tradi-
tional), “Friendship” (Sydney); handbells performed
by the Well-known Barnardo Musical Boys, “The Le-
gend of the Beilis,” “Chiming Bells of Lengthy In the past”
(Christobel); Joseph Szigeti, violin solo, “Tam-
bourin Chinois” (Kreisler); Silver Stars Band, “The
Marriage ceremony March” (Mendelssohn), “Communicate” Nich-
olls). 4.30 p.m.: Shut down. EARLY EVENING
SESSION. —(Announcer: Jack Broadbent.) 6/15
p.m.: Solutions to. letters and birthday greetings
05′ “Uncle David.” 6..20 p.m.: Monsieur Son-
ox-f, musical alternatives. 6.30 p.m.: , “The Storey
Woman” will inform a narrative to the kids. 6.40 p.m.’:
Mollie Horlock, pianist, will play to the kids,
“Slumber Music.” 6.45 p.m.: Monsieur Sonora,
musical alternatives. 7.Zero p.m.: Request numbers for
the kids. EVENING SESSlON.—(Accompanist:
Leila Learn. Announcer: Jack Broadbent.) 7.15
p.m.: A. M. O’Leary will communicate on “Cricket.”.
7.30 p.m.: a studio live performance by the Discus En-
semble and 7ZL artists —Ketelby’s Orchestra, “Bells
Throughout the Meadows” (Ketelby)-, orchestra, “In a
Fairy Realm” suite (Ketelby). 7.37 p.m.: Jean
Hibbard, soprano, “The Dove”. (Bond), “Longing”
Ronald). 7.42 p.m.: Leila Learn, pianist, “Se-
lected.” 7.47: Jack Broadbent, baritone, “The
Deathless Military,” “Salaam.” 7.52 p.m.: Wilfred
, Kemp, violin solo, “Indian Love Lyrics.” 8.2 p.m.:
Jean Hibbard, soprano, “Butterfly Wings” (Phil-
lips), “’Tis June” (Ronald). 8.9 p.m.: S. Bur-
bury, pianist, “Chosen.” 8.16 p.m.: Jack Broad-
bent, baritone, “Mom Machree” (Ball), “Vale”
(Russell). 8.23 p.m.: Wilfred Kemp, violin solo,
Service provider of Venice.” 8.33 p.m.: S. Burbury, pian-
ist, “Chosen.” 8.38 p.m;: John Brownlee, bari-
tone “I’ll Not Complain”, (sung in German). 8.41
p.m.; Leila Learn, pianist, “Chosen.” 8.45 p.m.:
J. M. Counsel, “A Musical Hour with the Previous Mas-
ters,” “The Historical past and Improvement of Music.”
9.45 p.m.: , The Royal Autocar Membership of Tasmania
security, message for to-day. 9.50: Information session—
British official wi-fi information. Readings from the
“Weekly Courier.” “Mercury” particular Tasmanian
information service. Railway public sale produce gross sales held
at Railway. Climate info. Hobart Inventory
Trade quotations. Royal Autocar Membership of Tas-
mania street information for the week-end. Notes by the
newbie athletic affiliation. Biking ( notes by the
Hobart Biking Affiliation. Market studies from
Messrs. Roberts and Co. and Messrs. Sensible and
Stirling. 10.0: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 10.1:
Our Tasmanian Good-night thought. 10,2: God
Save the King; shut down.

P.27 – Chas. D. Maclurcan Advert[edit]

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Native Programmes, Saturday, January 5[edit]

Native Programmes, Saturday, January 5
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
7.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
7.2 a.m.- Official climate forecast; rainfall,
river studies; temperatures; astronomical
memoranda.
7.7 a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” sum-
mary.
7.12 a.m.: Transport intelligence; mail ser-
vices.
7.15 p.m.: Studio music.
8.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben.” Shut down,
markets; steel quotations; wool gross sales,
breadstuffs markets; inter-State markets;
produce markets.
7.40 a.m.: Studio music.
7.25 a.m.: Funding market; mining share
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
10.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte copy.
10.10 a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information
service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music.
10.30 a.m.: Final-minute sporting info
by the 2FC Racing Commissioner.
,10.40 a.m.: Studio music.
10.45 a.m.: A chat on ‘‘Gardening,” by J. G
Lockley (“Redgum”).
11.Zero a.m.: “Massive Ben.”
A.P.A. and Reuter’s cable companies.
11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MID-DAY AND AFTERNOON SESSIONS.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
12.Zero Midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins
12.2 p.m.: Inventory Trade info.
12.Four p.m.: Studio music.
12.10 p.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information
service.
12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
12.20 p.m.: Studio music.
12 45 p.m.: Cricket scores, third Check match.
England v. Australia, performed at Melbourne
1.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Climate intelligence.
1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” mid-day information ser-
vice.
1.20 p.m.: Studio music.
1.45 p.m.: From the New South Wales Garden
Tennis Floor, Ifushcutters’ Bay, descrip-
tion of the worldwide tennis, British
Isles v. Australia. Throughout intervals between
play fashionable music from the Studio, and
a novelty music act by Leo and Marie will
be broadcast.
5.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSiON.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
5.40 p.m.- The chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.; The youngsters’s sessicn, conductce
by the “Whats up Man.”
Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: Music and leisure.
6.40 p.m.: Climate intelligence, delivery.
Inventory Trade.
6.45 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information
6.50 p.m.: Sporting information, late information, ant.
studio music.
7.10 p.m.. The 2FC Dinner Quartette, con
ducted by Horace Keats.
(a) “Pansies” (Nicholls).
(b) “I Love You” (Reubens).
(c) “Airs and Graces” (Monckfon).
(d) “I’ll Sing Thee Songs of Araby” (Clay).
(e) Foxtrot.
(f) “My Rosary for You” (Eail)
EVENING SESSIONS
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.47 p.m,: Pianoforte copy.
7.54 p.m. Common music.
8.Zero p.m.: “Massive Ben.” From Liverpool Stau
Hospital. The 2FC hospital live performance half*,
below the path of Chaces Lawrenc a
will entertain the sufferers.
9.30 p.m.. From the studio. Climate report
9.31 p.m.: Carlton andNShaw n a populai
musical act.
9.38 p.m From the Wentwortn. The Went
price Cafe Dance Orchestra below the
path of Jimmy Elkins.
9.48 p.m.: From the studio The Tw< Revellers. 9.58 p.m : Carlton, and Shaw »musical en tertainers). 10.5 p.m ; From the Speedway Royal, de- scription of the races. 10.15 pm.: From the studio The Two Revellers. 10.25 p.m.. Carlton and Shaw imusical en- tertainers) . 10.30 p.m.. Late climate and announce- ments. 10.32 p.m.: From the Wentworth. The Wentworth Cafe Dance Oru estra, undei the path of Jimmy Elkin 10.57 p.m.: From the studio 10-morrows programme. 10.59 p.m.: From the Wernworth Tin Wentworth Cafe Dance Orchestra, below the path of Jimmy Elkins 11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem lose down 2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: Bas.l Knke.
8.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Metropolitan climate report
8.1 a.m.: State climate report.
8.2 a.m.: Studio music.
8.15 a.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
Information from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial ”
8.25 a.m.: Studio music.
8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
Studio music.
8.35 a.m.: Data, mails, snipping, ar-
rivals, departures, and sailings.
8.38 a.m.- Information from the “Day by day Telegraph
Pictorial.”
8.45 a.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
Studio music.
9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chirms
Studio music.
9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with spent pals
10.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Shut down.
MIDDAY AND AFTERNOON SESSIONS
Announcers: Basil Kirke and A. C. C.
Stevens.
11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Mr. J. Kinght
Barnett, who
will he announ-
cing to-night.
Ladies’s session, carried out by Mrs. Cran
subject.
What’s on on the footage and theatres.
Novel options to listeners.
Week-end specials.
11.30 a.m.: Promoting hints.
12.Zero midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Particular ocean forecast and climate report.
12.Three p.m.: Studio music.
12.30 p.m.: “Solar” information service.
Throughout the afternoon descriptions of the
races within the operating can be broadcast from
the Warwick Farm assembly at Randwick
Objects from the studio by Tom King,
Frankie Stott, and Ivy Gayler
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcers: Basil Kirke and J. Knight
Barnett.
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session.
Music and leisure.
6.Zero p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information service.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartetti.
(a) “Libellen” (Hesse).
(b) “Chicken Songs at Eventide” 2GB

5.30 p.m.: Kids’s session, by Uncle George.
7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: Dance pro-
gramme. 9.Zero p.m.: Request night 10.0
p.m.: Grown-up bedtime tales. VV” r ‘ am.:
Shut down.

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P.30 – Interstate Programmes, Saturday, January 5[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Saturday, January 5

3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.IS p.m.: Morning
melodies. 7.20 p.m.: Morning workout routines to music.
7.30 p.m.: Inventory studies, market studies. Basic
information. Transport and sporting info. 8,0
a.m.; Melbourne Observatory time sign. 8.1
a.m.: Morning melodies. .8.15 a.m.; Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.— (Announcer John Stuart.
Accompanist: Agnes Fortune.) 11.Zero a.m.: Eric
Welch will communicate on to-day’s races at Sandown
Park. 11.10 a.m.: The Strad Trio. “Op. 32 in D
Minor” (Arensky). Allegro Moderato. Scherzo.
11.24 a.m.: Senia Chostiakoff (tenon, “Stunning
Eyes” (Gipsy Romance). Chosen. 11.31 a.m.:
Cecil Parkes and Could Broderick (violin and
piano) “Sonata for Violin and Piano in F
Main” (Beethoven). Allegro con brio. Adagio.
Scherzo. 11.47 a.m.: Senia Chostiakoff (tenor).
Choices from his repertoire. 11.54 a.m.: Frank
Johnstone (’cello). “Andante and Gavotte” (Han-
del). 12.Zero midday: Melbourne Observatory time sig-
nal. Specific prepare info. 12.1 p.m.: Steel
costs acquired by the Australian Mines and
Metals Affiliation, from the London Inventory Ex-
change this present day. British official wi-fi information
from Rugby. Reuter’s and the Australian Press
Affiliation cables. “Argus” information service. MID-
DAY MUSICAL SESSION. —(Announcer: John
Stuart. Accompanist: Agnes Fortune. 1 12.20 p.m.:
The station orchestra. Ballet music, “Faust”
(Gounod). 12.30 p.m.: Syd. Hollister (comic)
“Smile a Whereas.” 12.37 p.m.: Inventory Trade in-
formation. 12.40 p.m.: The station orchestra.
“Second Suite Ballet Egyptien” (Luigini). 12.50
p.m,: Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a
Bh o rt recital. 12.57 p.m.: John Barrillle (fiute)
and A. Anderson (clarinet). “l’Encore.” 1.Four p.m.:
The station orchestra. Piano and strings, “Sere-
nata” (Toselli). “Romance” (Popper). 1.11 p.m.:
Meteorological info. Climate forecast for
Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales, and South
Australia. Ocean forecasts. River studies. Rain-
fall. 1.17: Syd. Hollister icomedian), “Topi-
calities.” 1.24 p.m.: The Station orchestra.
“Serenade” (Saint-Saensi. “March Miniature”
(Jacobi). 1.34 p.m.: Keith Desmond, (elocution-
ist) will give a brief recital. 1.40 p.m.: The
station orchestra. “Gems No. 2” (Pirani). 1.45
p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: John Stuart.) 2.13 p.m.: Description
of Two-year-old Handicap, 5 furlongs, Sandown
Park Races, by Eric Welch. 2.20 p.m.: Descrip-
tion of pennant cricket match, Richmond v. Prah-
ran, at Richmond, by Rod M’Gregor. 2.43 p.m.:
Description of Trial Welter Handicap, 1 mile,
Sandown Park Races. 2.50 p.m.: Description of
pennant cricket match, Richmond v. Prahran,
at Richmond. 3.13 p.m.: Description of Sandown
Plate, 6 furlongs, Sandown Park Races. 3.20
p.m.: Description of pennant cricket match, Wealthy-
mond v. Prahran, at Richmond. 3.43 p.m.: De-
scription of Sandown Park Handicap, one mile,
Sandown Park Races. 3.50 p.m.: Description of
pennant cricket match, Richmond v. Prahran. at
Richmond. 4.Zero p.m.: Sonora recital of the world’s
most well-known data. 4.13 p.m.: Description of
Sandown Purse, 6 furlongs, Sandown Park Races.
4.20 p.m.: Description of pennant cricket match.
Richmond v. Prahran, at Richmond. 4.43 p.m.:
Description of Jumpers’ Flat Race. 1(Four mile, San-
down Park Races. 4.50 p.m.: Description of pen-
nant cricket match, Richmond v. Prahran, at Wealthy-
mond. 5.Zero p.m.: “Herald” information service. 5.10
p.m.; Description of pennant cricket match,
Richmond v. Prahran, at Richmond. 5.30 p.m.:
Shut down. Throughout the afternoon progress scores
of the cricket match, England v. Geelong, will
be broadcast as they arrive handy. EVENING
SESSION. —(Announcer: Frank Hatherley.) 5.50
p.m.. Sporting outcomes. 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions to
letters and birthday greetings by “Little Miss
Kookaburra. 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30
p.m.: “Miss Kookaburra” will inform her Little
Kookaburrettes “About Tiby Kittycat’s Holidays,”
after which some extra about “Jack ‘and Jill and the
Jolly Day’s Secret.” NIGHT SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: C. J. O’Connor. Accompanist: Agnes For-
tune.) 6.50 p.m.: Inventory Trade info.
7.Zero p.m.: River studies. Market studies by the
Victorian Producers’ Co-operatiye, Firm, Ltd.
Poultry, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy produce,
potatoes and onions. Market studies of fruit by
the Victorian Fruitgrowers’ Affiliation. Entire-
sale costs of fruit by the Wholesale Fruit Mer-
chants’ Affiliation. Citrus fruits. 7.15 p.m.:
Information session. Stumps scores. Pennant cricket
match, Richmond v. Prahran, at Richmond. 7.23
p.m.: Birthday greetings. 7.25 p.m.: Out of the
Previous. 7.26 p.m.: E. E. Pescott. Australian Crops,
“The Wheel Tree.” 7.45 p.m.: Dr. J. A. Leach.
“Shrike-Thrushes.” 8.Zero p.m.: A Maker of His-
tory.” Programme bulletins. Tasmanian
letter to 3LO from the “Courier,” Launceston. 8.5
p.m.: The station orchestra. “Fantasie” (Schu-
bert). 8.15 p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano). “The
First Violet” (Mendelssohn). “Persian Music of
Spring” (M’Burney). 8.22 p.m.: The station quar-
tette. “First Motion Quartette.” 8.32 p.m.:
Senia Chostiakoff (tenor). “A Legende” (Tschai-
kowsky) . “Slumber Music” (Gretchaninoff). 8.39
p.m.: The station orchestra. Fantasie. “Him-
melelsgrube” (Haydn). 8.Four p.m.: Viva Holgate
Clarke. “Pastorale and Cappriccio” (Scarletti).
“Preludes in G Main and G Minor” (Chopin).
“Musical Field” (Laidow). 9.Zero p.m.f The Radio
Melody-makers. Twenty minutes of melody. 9.20
p.m.: Eric Welch will describe to-night’s occasions
on the Stadium. 9.35 p.m.: The station orchestra.
“Polichinelle” (Rachmaninoff). 9.40 p.m.: Syd.
Hollister (comic). “A Little Nonsense.” 9.50
p.m.: The station orchestra. Overture, “Leon-
ore” (Beethoven). “At Dawning” (Cadman).
10.Zero p.m.: Eric Welch will describe to-night’s
occasions on the Stadium. 10.15 p.m.: The station
orchestra. “Mock Morris” (Grainger). 10.20
pan.: Syd. Hollister (comic). “Saturday Night time
Tales.” 10.27 p.m.: Percy Code (trumpet), “I
Handed by Your Window.” 10.32 p.m.: Keith Des-
mond (elocutionist). Choices from his reper-
toire. 10.39 p.m.: The station orchestra. “La-
ingana” ißobnt. “Pas des Amphores” iChamin-
ade). 10.49 pan.: Late sporting outcomes. 10.55
p.m.: Our nice thought for to-day. 10.56 p.m.:
The Radi-o-Aces. “Loneliness” (Pollack). “Clar-
inet Marmalade” (Fergus). “Ramona” (Wayne).
“Rain” (Ruby). “I Like to Dunk a Hunk of
Sponge-cake” (Castill). “As a result of My Child Don’t
Imply Perhaps Now” (Donaldson). “Beloved”
(Kahn). “Simply Like a Melody Out of the Sky”
(Donaldson). “Lazy Ft” piano solo (Masmam.
“That’s What You Imply to Me” (Davis). “Chloe”
(Kahn). “Lenora” (Gilbert). ‘That Stolen
Melody” (Fisher). “Adoree” (West). “Googily
Goo” (Davis). “Good-night Waltz” (Biboi, 11.40
pm.: God Save the King,
3AR
“Grand Opera.” 3.35 p.m.: Vocal variations. 3.45
p.m.: Johnson’s Studio Boys. “Fox Trots.” 4.0
p.m.: Vocal variations. 4.10 p.m.: Johnson’s
Studio Boys. “Waltzes.” 4.25 p.m.: Vocal varia-
tions. 4.35 p.m.: Johnson’s Studio Boys.
“Marches.” 4.42 p.m.: Bulletins. 4.45 p.m.:
Vocal variations. 4.50 p.m.: Johnson’s Studio
Boys. “Waltzes.” 5.Zero p.m.: Shut down. EVEN-
ING SESSION.-—6.0: Candy Solace from the Sera-
phina. NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer: Frank
Hatherley. Accompanist: Reg Browne.) 8,0
p.m.: All sporting outcomes, together with outcomes
of cricket match, England v. Geelong, at
Geelong. 8.30 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band. Choice.
“Musical Fragments.” March, “Rubenstein” i Bid-
good). 8.45 p.m.: J. Alexander Browne, “If 1
Would possibly Solely Come to You” (Squire). “Free
Lance” (Dix). 8.52 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band.
Waltz, “Will o’ the Wisp” (Bourne). 9.Zero p.m.’
Winifred Moverley. A Story, “The Storm Name”
(Maurice). 9.7 p.m.: Honolulu Duo. “Hawaiian
Waltz,” “Isle of Golden Goals.” 9.14 p.m.:
Jessie Batchelor (mezzo-soprano). “Husheen”
(Needham), “When Love is Type” (A.L.). 9.21
p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band. Intermezzo, “Australia
To-day’* (Lithgow). March, “Nationwide Conclave.”
9.31 p.m.: J. Alexander Browne. “Two Indian
Love Lyrics” (Rinden), 9.38 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis
Band. Waltz, “Riordanza.” March, “Successful
Eight” (Holtzman). 9.48 p.m.: Winifred Mover-
ley. A narrative, “Honeymooners from the Coun-
strive” (O’Brien). 9.55 p.m.: Honolulu Duo. “For-
get Me Not” “Kalima Waltz.” 10.2 p.m.: Jessie
Batchelor (mezzo-soprano i. “Vorrei” (Tosti).
“You in a Gondola” (Clarke). 10.9 p.m.: Coburg-
Metropolis Band. Choice, “Opera Boquet.” 10.19
p.m.: “Age” information service, unique to 3AR.
Climate forecast. Cricket outcomes. 10.28 p.m.:
Our Shakespearean good-night, citation. 10.30
p.m.: God Save the King.
4QG
EARLY, MORNING SESSION.— (Announcer’ J. Ty-
son.) ”.43 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information
service. 8,Zero a.m.: Some electrical data. 8.15
a.m.: Information service. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.—From the racecourse—A
description of the races: Objects entrance the studio
and the Tivoli Theatre; can be relayed between
races. 5,Zero p.m.: Shut down. EARLY EVENING
SESSION.—6.O ,p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances;
particular “Queenslander” bi-weekly information service for
distant listeners. 6.30 p.m.: Mattress-time tales, con-
ducted by “Uncle Ben.” 7.15 p.m.: To-day’s race
leads to transient. 7.20 p.m.: Basic, sporting notes.
7.30 p.m.: Crusing notes, by Mr. Fred Smith.
NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcers: H. Humphreys
and A. V. James.) 8.Zero p.m.: From the Savoy
Theatre, Clayfield—Orchestral music. 8.15 pm.:
A brief music recital by Verna Morcom (soprano)—
“Secrecy” (Hugo Wolf), “Music to Spring” (Hugo
Wolf), “Suppose Tenderly” (Sharp), “Shepherd, Thy
Manner Differ” (Brown), “Adieu” (Schubert),
“Thou Artwork My Relaxation” (Schubert)i 8.45 p.m.’ Or-
chestral music 9.Zero p.m.: Dance music. 915 p.m.:
Motor cycle races. 9.45 p.m.: Dance music. 10.0
p.m.: The “Sunday Mail” information; climate information.
Shut down.
5CL
MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. L. Norris.)
11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 11.1 a.m.’ Late sport-
ing alternatives for Sandown Bark Races by Mr.
Eric Welch, 3LO’s Particular Sporting Commissioner.
Common Sonora recital. Parlophone recordings.
Dorsey Brothers and their orchestra, “Come
Again, Chiquita.” “Was It a Dream?” Arthur
Nealy (vocalist). “Lonely Little Bluebird.” Sid-
ney Burchall (baritone). “Felix the Cat.”
“Naughty Eyes.” Goof us 5 and orchestra. “All
the Time.” “Vaniteaser.” 11.20 a.m.: 5CL’s
sporting calendar. 11.22 a.m,; Sonora recital (con-
tinued). Parlophone recordings. Grand Sym-
phony Orchestra. -‘Fra Diavolo” (Auber). Tossy
Spiwakosky (violinist). “Dervishes’ Refrain”
(Beethoven). Fred Corridor and his Sugar Infants.
“Darling.” “On the Night time We Did the Bom Bom
by the Sea.” Ernest Millser (baritone). “For
Previous Time’s Sake.’ Reminiscences of France.” 11.40
a.m.: Late sporting alternatives for Sandown Park
by Mr. Eric Welch, 3LO’s Particular Sporting Com-
missioner. 11.43 a.m.: “The Advertiser” basic
information service. 11.55 a.m.: British official wi-fi
information. 12.Zero midday: G.P.O. chimes and shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.—I2.4S p.m.: From Mor-
phettville Racecourse. Positions and riders for
Novice Hurdles. S.A.J.C. assembly. 1.Zero p.m.: Run-
ning description of Novice Hurdles by Mr. Arnold
Treloar. 1.5 p.m.: From studio. Musical inter-
lude on Sonora. Grand Symphony Orchestra.
“Zampa” (overture), (Suppe). Edith Lorand (vio-
liniste), “Danse Espagnole.” ,1.25 p.m,: From Mor-
phettville Racecourse. Positions and riders for
Helmsdale Welter. 1.30 p.m.: From studio. Dance
music on the Sonora. Dajos Bela Orchestra. “O
Sole Mio.” “Superb” (Tosti). “The Sphinx.” “You,
Solely You.” 1.40 p.m.: From Morphettvilie Race-
course. Operating description of the Helmsdale
Welter by Mr. Arnold Treloar. 1.45 p.m.: From
studio. Army band live performance. Royal Guards
Band. “Morning, Midday, and Night time” (Suppe).
“Poet and Peasant.” Nationwide Army Band.
“Washington Publish.” “The Wood Troopers.”
Prince’s Grand Live performance Band. “Carmen” (selec-
tion), “Hungarian Rhapsody.” 2 Four p.m.: San-
down Park outcome. Two-year-old Handicap. 2.5
p.m.: From Morphettville Racecourse. Positions
and riders for second division of Helmsdale Wel-
ter. 2.10 p.m.: From studio. Vocal interlude on
Sonora. Vernon Paris (baritone). “Lily of La-
guna.” “I Can Hear the Music.” Sophie Tucker
(contralto). “I Ain’t Obtained No person.” 2.20 p.m.:
From Morphettville Racecourse. Operating descrip-
tion of the Second Division of the Helmsdale
Welter by Mr. Arnold Treloar. 2.24 p.m.: From
studio. Sandown Park outcomes. Path Welter Han-
dicap. 2.2 p p.m.: Orchestral diversion. Main
Bowes’ Capitol Theatre Orchestra. “Pale Moon.”
“My Isle of Golden Goals.” Daios Bela Or-
chestra. “The Flowers’ Dream.” “Whispering .of
the Flowers.” Arnold Frank and his orchestra.
“You’re a Actual Sweetheart.” “How May Any-
factor so Good be Unhealthy?” The Royal Music Makers.
“Beloved.” 2.45 p.m.: From Morphettville Race-
course. Positions and riders for Cowandilla Han-
dicap. 2.50 p.m.: From studio. Instrumental and
vocal solos. Victor Staub (pianist). “Golliwogs’
, Cakewalk.” “Minstrels.” Ernest Miller (bari-
tone solo), “Reminiscences of France.” 2.59 p.m.: San-
down Park outcomes. Sandown Plate. 3.Zero p.m.’
From Morphettville Racecourse. Description of
Cowandilla Handicap by Mr. Arnold Treloar. 3.5
p.m : From Regent Theatre. Symphonic music by
orchestra below the conductorship of Mr. W. R.
Cade. “ 3.25 p.m.: From Morphettville Racecourse.
Positions and riders for Seacliffe Handicap. 3.29
p.m.: From studio. Sandown Park outcomes. San-
down Park Handicap. 3.30 p.m.: Inter-State and
worldwide cricket scores. 3.35 p.m.: Musical in-
terlude on Sonora. Hardy Williamson and Ro-
bert Howe (vocal duetiests). “The Flowers that
Bloom within the Spring.” “Rising Early within the
Morning.” 3.40 p.m.: From Morphettville Race-
course. Description of the Seacliffe Handicap by
Mr. Arnold Treloar. 3.45 p.m.: From studio.
Diana Belmont (contralto). “A Blackbird Singing,”
“Nocturne.” French Brothers (instrumentalists).
“Danse Oriental” (French). “Chloe” (Moret).
Gertrude Grey (mezzo). “When Thv Blue Eyes”
(Lassen). “Prayer” (Hiller). Jean Finlay (pian-
iste). “London Bridge” (Gardiner). “April”
(Bridge). 4.Four p.m.: Sandown Park Races. San-
down Park outcomes. 4.5 p.m.: From Morphett-
ville Racecourse. Positions and riders for New
12 months’s Present. 4.10 p.m.: From studio. Diana Bel-
mont (contralto). “Unfolding” ■ (Lehmann). “June”
Lehmann). French Brothers (instrumentalists).
“Melancholy Child” (Burnett), “Sentimental Child”
(Palmer). Gertrude Grey (mezzo). “The Arrow
and the Music” (Balfei. “Massive Woman Moon” (Tay-
lor). 4.20 p.m.: promenade Morphettville Racecourse.
Operating description of New 12 months’s Present by Mr.
Arnold Treloar. 4.24 p.m.: From studio. Sandown
Park outcomes. Jumpers’ Flat Race. 4.25 p.m. •
From Regent Theatre. Symphonic alternatives. 4.45
p.m.: Entrance Morphettville Racecourse. Positions
and riders for final race. 4.50 p.m.: Resume of
afternoon’s sporting. 5.Zero p.m.: From Morphett-
ville Racecourse. Operating description of Marino
Handicap by Mr. Arnold Treloar. 5.10 p.m.: Shut
down. EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer: Athol
Lykke.) 6.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 6.1 p.m.: Re-
sume of to-day’s sporting. 6.10 p.m.: Kids’s
Blissful moments. Birthday greetings, correspond-
ence, songs and tales by “The Wattle Woman.”
6.40 p.m.: Musical interlude. Dinner music on
Sonora. 7.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 7.1 p.m.: S. C.
Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade info. 7.8
p.m.: Cricket scores and station bulletins.
7.10 p.m.: Rev. G. E. Hale, B.A. Discuss on “Poetry
and Science.” 7.25 p.m.: “Wilolw. Discuss on the
afternoon’s match. 7.35 p.m.: C. G. Riley. Discuss
on “Objects of Curiosity.” 7.47 p.m.: 5CL’s sport-
ing service. NIGHT SESSION. —8.1 p.m.: Solomon
Sisters (instrumentalists). “Serenade” (Schu-
bert). “Prelude in C Sharp Minor.” 8.14 p.m.:
French Brothers (instrumentalists). “De Ziveifel”
(Glinka). “After My Laughter” (Turk). “You’re
a Actual Sweetheart.” 8.20 p.m.: Signor Torre (bari-

tone). “Cartigiani” (Verdi). “Zitellgf (Catta-
nei). 8.26 p.m.: Solomon Sisters (inio.’umental-
ists), “Let Me Gaze” (GoGunod 1 . Intermezzo from
“Cavalleria Rusticana.” 8.32 p.m.: Gertrude
Grey (mezzo). “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal.”
“Sylvan.” 8.38 p.m.: George Whittle (humorist)
in a humorous interlude. 8.44 p.m.: Solomon Sis-
ters (instrumentalists). “Three Miniatures”
(Bridge). “Three Pours” (Taylor). “Melodie”
(Moszkowski). 8.54 p.m.: Diana Belmont (con-
tralto). “Summer time Storms.” “Roseleaves.” 9.0
p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 9.1 p.m.: A broadcast of
excellent curiosity. 9.12 p.m.: French Brothers
(instrumentalists). “Beneath , a Tropic Moon.”
“Lolita” (Stonehamn 9.18 p.m.: Signor Torre
(baritone). “Parted” (Tosti). “II Libro Santo”
(Pinsuiti). 9.24 p.m.: Solomon Sisters (instrumen-
talists). “Finale of Trio 1” (Haydn). “Romance”
(Riessiger). “Easy Aveu” (Tnome). “Entr’acte
Gavotte” (Thomas). “Barcarolle” (Woltag). 10.5
p.m.: A broadcast of intense curiosity. 10.15 p.m.:
5CL’s sporting service. 10.29 p.m.: Our Good-
evening Thought, “It’s usually sensible to reveal what
can’t be hid.” 10.30 p.m.: On with the
dance. By courtesy of 3LO, Melbourne. Trendy
dance numbers by the Radi-o-Aces. 11.10 p.m.:
God Save the King.
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSlON.—(Announcer: Jack Broad-
bent.) 11.30 a.m.: Choices by the Melody Mas-
ters. 11.34 a.m.: Particular Midlands climate fore-
solid. 11.55 a.m.: Tasmanian stations’ 9 a.m.
climate report. 12 midday; G.P.O. clock chimes
the hour. 12.1 p.m.: Transport info. Ships
inside wi-fi vary. Mail notices. Business
information. Housewives’ information. 12.Eight p.m.: Choices
by the Melody Masters. 12.11 p.m.: British offi-
cial wi-fi information. 12.20 p.m.: Choices by the
Melody Masters. 12.29 p.m.: Bulletins.
12.30 p.m.: Anticipations—3LO, Melbourne, sport-
ing commissioner’s final minute’s alternatives for
Melbourne races; additionally alternatives for Sydney races,
by our particular consultant. 12.33 p.m.: Selec-
tions by the Melody Masters. 12.55 p.m.: “Mer-
cury” information service. ‘ 1.10 p.m.: Choices by the
Melody Masters. 1.30 p.m.: Shut down. 2.15
p.m.: Operating description of Two-year-old Han-
dicap, 5 furlongs, run at Sandown Park Race-
course, Melbourne. 2.20 p.m.: Shut down. 2.45
p.m.: Operating description of Trial Welter Han-
dicap, 1 mile, run at Sandown Park Racecourse,
Sandown, Melbourne. 2.50 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION. — (Announcer: Jack Broad-
bent.) 3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour.
3.1 p.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters. 3.4
p.m.: Climate info. 3.5 p.m.: Trans-
mission from the T.C.A. Floor, cricket match.
North-west v. Sandy Bay, described by A. M.
O’Leary. 3.15 p.m.: Operating description of San-
down Plate, 6 furlongs, run at Sandown Park
Racecourse, Sandown, Melbourne. 3.20 p.m.: Trans-
mission from the T.C.A. Floor, cricket match,
North-west v. Sandy Bay, described by A. M.
O’Leary. 3.45 p.m.: Operating description of San-
down Park Handicap, 1 mile, run at Sandown
Pari. Racecourse, Sandown, Melbourne. 3.50 p.m.:
Transmission from the T.C.A. Floor, cricket
match. North-west v. Sandy Bay, described by A.
M. O’Leary. 4.Zero p.m.: Choices by the Melody
Masters. 4.15 p.m.: Operating description of San-
down Purse, 6 furlongs, run at Sandown Park
Racecourse, Sandown, Melbourne. 4.20 p.m.: Thans-
inission from the T.C.A. Floor, cricket match,
North-west v. Sandy Bay, described by A. M.
O’Leary. 4.45 p.m.: Operating description of Soar-
ers’ Flat Race, 1(Four miles, run at Sandown Park
Racecourse, Sandown, Melbourne. 4.50 p.m.: All
sporting outcomes handy. 5.Zero p.m.: Shut down.
Throughout the afternoon an outline can be given
of the motor-paced contest, Hubert Opperman v.
R W. (“Fatty”) Lamb, raced at T.C.A. Floor.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.—6.O p.m.: All sport-
ing outcomes handy. 6.15 p.m.: Choices by the
Melody Masters. 6.45 p.m.: “Uncle David” will
entertain the wee folks. 7.Zero p.m.: Solutions to let-
ters and birthday greetings by “Uncle David.”
7.5 p.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters. 7.15
p.m.: Information session. “Mercury” particular informa-
tion Hobart Inventory Trade quotations. To-
day’s golf, athletics, racing, cricket, “MercUry”
late sporting information. Outcomes of New City Egg
Laying competitors, homing and bowling. EVEN-
ING SESSION. —7.30 p.m.: L. Norman, secretary
Tasmanian Regatta Council, will communicate on “First
Regatta on Derwent, in 1827.” 7.45 p.m.: Con-
clusion of the story of Previous Jim Corbett, one-time
world’s champion boxer. “Dramatic Exit from the
Ring.” 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour.
8.1 p.m.: Fifty years in the past to-day. 8.6 p.m.: Se-
lections by the Melody Masters. 8.30 p.m.: Trans-
m.ssion from the Continental, Macquarie Avenue,
Hobart—Theo Pipkin and his Continental Orches-
tra: “The Man I Love” (Gershwin), “Sunshine”
ißerlin), “Simply Like a Melody” (Donaldson), “Win-
gin’ Residence” (Russell), “Stunning” (Shay), “Dream
Home” (Cowan), “One Alone” (Romberg), “Lone-
some within the Moonlight” (Baer), “Cheerie Beerie
Be” (Wayne), “Jeannine” (Gilbert), “Is it Gonna
Be Lengthy?” (Cowan), “After My Laughter Got here
Tears” (Turk), “Riff Music” (Romberg), “My An-
gel” (Rapee), “Generally I’m Blissful” (Yoemans),
“Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella” (Fain). 10.20
p.m.: From the studio—to-d.*y’s sporting information.
“Mercury” particular information service. Ships inside
wi-fi vary. Tasmanian district climate re-
port. Bowling, homing, cricket, and tennis. 10.50
p.m.’ The Royal Autocar Membership of Tasmania security
message for to-day. 10.51: “Our Tasmanian
gooa-night thought. 10.52 p.m.: God Save the
Save the King; shut down.

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P.32 – Jackson Condensers Advert[edit]

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P.32 – Native Programmes, Sunday, Jan. 6[edit]

Native Programmes, Sunday, Jan. 6

2FC
MORNING SESSION
(Announcer: A,- S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Studio music.
10.15 a.m.: Information service.
10.30 a.m.: Studio music.
11 a.m.: Morning service, broadcast from
Methodist Church, Oxford Avenue. Minister:
Rev. T. Jenkin.
12.15 p.m. (Approx.): Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
(Announcer: John Holland.)
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32 p.m.: Kids’s session, carried out by
the “Whats up Man;” letters and tales; music
and leisure.
Three p.m.: Recital of specifically chosen data.
3.30 p.m.: From the Band Rotunda, Manly
Seashore, the Manly Band.
5 p.m.: From the Studio. Shut down.
EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: Ewart Chappie.)
6 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; programme announce-
ments.
6.5 p.m.: The Empire Trio, in affiliation
with Miss le Brun Brown.
“Trio in C Minor” (Mendelssohn).
Songs: (a) “To You” (Forster).
(b) “My Soul” (Jacobs-Bond).
(c) “The Owl” (Barnes-Wells).
Prelude, “Herodiade” (Massenet).
Songs: (a) “Le Crepuscule” (Massenet).
(b) “Elf and Fairy” (Densmore).
“Trio in G” (Hurlstone).
7 p.m.: Night service, broadcast from St.
Stephen’s.
8.30 p.m.: From the Band Rotunda, Manly
Seashore, the Manly Band.
9.30 p.m.: Leo Darnton, tenor.
(a) “Take a Pair of Glowing Eyes’* (Sul-
livan).
(b) “A Wandering Minstrel I” (Sullivan).
(c) “Songs My Mom Taught Me”
(Dvorak).
9.37 pm.: Lionel Lawson.
9.44 p.m.: Leo Darnton, tenor.
(a) “Parted” (Tosti).
(b) “Sailor’s Grave” (Sullivan).
9.52 p.m.: Lionel Lawson.
10 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; recital of data of
world-famous artists.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2BL
NEW SOUTH WALES BROADCASTING
COMPANY. LIMITED.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
11 am.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Service broadcast from St. Jude’s, Rand-
wick. Minister, Rev. Canon Cakebread.
12.15 p.m. approx.: From the studio. ‘Solar”
information service.
12.30 p.m.: Studio music.
2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Three p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Nice Sunday afternoon from Haberfield
Church. Minister, Rev. Richard Piper.
4.30 p.m.: From the studio, studio music.
5 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes. Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
6 p.m.: Kids’s session, carried out by
Uncle Bas.
6.20 p.m.: Letters and tales.
7 p.m.: Night service from the Dulwich
Hill Salvation Military Temple, carried out by
Colonel Bell.
8.30 p.m.: From studio, Empire Trio in as-
sociation with Miss le Brun Brown, assist-
ed by Willa Fleeting, and Alfred Wilmore.
Trio, No. 1, Op. 1.
Songs: (a) Solveig’s Cradle Music” (Grieg).
(b) “Spring” (Grieg).
Three items (Pache).
Songs (a) ‘Earlier than My Window” (Rach-
maninoff).
(b) “The Swan Bent Low# to the Lily”
(MacDowell).
(C) “Gray Clouds” (Besly).
Trio, Op. 50 (Tschaikowsky).
10 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Nationwide Anthem.
Shut down.
2GB
10.15 a.m.: Organ music, from St. Alban’s
Church, Redfern. 10.30 a.m.: Morning ser-
vice. 12 midday: Shut down. 2.30 p.m.:
Kids’s session. 7.Zero p.m.: Lecture from
Adyar Corridor. 8.Zero p.m.: Sacred live performance from
Adyar Corridor. 8.15 p.m.: Songs by Mr. Vic-
tor Earle. 8.22 p.m.: Violin solos by Miss
Doreen Douglas. 8.30 p.m.: Songs by Miss
Dorothy Toppin. 8.37 p.m.: Songs by Mr.
Cecil Houghton. 8.44 p.m.: Pianoforte
solos by Miss Mollie Jones. 8.52 p.m.:
Songs by Mr. Victor Earle. 9.Zero p.m.: Violin
solos by Miss Doreen Douglas. 9.Eight p.m.:
Songs by Miss Dorothy Toppin. 9.15 p.m.:
Pianoforte solos by Miss Mollie Jones. 9.23
pm.: Songs by Mr. Cecil Houghton. 9.30
p.m.: Shut down.

P.32 – Slingsby & Coles[edit]

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P.33 – Interstate Programmes, Solar., Jan. 6[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Solar., Jan. 6
3LO
MORNING SESSION.—IO.3O a.m.: Bells from St.
Paul’s Cathedral, Melbourne. 10.45 a.m.: Ex-
press prepare info. British official wi-fi
information from Rugby. Information from yesterday’s papers.
11.Zero a.m.: Morning service from the Toorak
Presbyterian Church, Toorak. Preacher, Rev. John
MacKenzie, M.A. Introit. Hymn 485, “Thou
Gracious God. – ’ Scripture, Previous Testomony. Prayer.
Thanksgiving and Confession. Prose Psalm 103.
Scripture, New Testomony. Prayer, Intercession.
Metrical Psalm 100. Kids’s handle. Lord’s
• Prayer. Kids’s hymn 576, “Truthful Waved the
Golden Corn.” Intimations. Anthem, “Reward His
Terrible Title.’’ Sermon. Prayer. Hymn 477,
“Our God Our Assist.” Benediction. 12.15 a.m.:
Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Frank Hatherley.) 2.0: Sonora recital of the
world’s most well-known data. 3.0: Nice Sunday
Afternoon Service, Wesley Church, Central Mis-
sion, Lonsdale Avenue. Alelbourne. Hymn No. 1,
“All Hail the Energy of Jesu’s Title.” Prayer.
Orchestral choice. Hymn No. 6, “Blessed As-
surance, Jesus is Mine.” Duet, Messrs. Godfrey
Brothers. Orchestra. Duet, Messrs. Godfrey
Brothers. Notices. Providing. Orchestra. Advert-
costume. Nationwide Anthem. Benediction. 4.30 p.m.:
Shut down. EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Frank Hatherley.) 5.45 p.m.: Transport informa-
tion. 5.47 p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday
greetings by “Bobby Bluegum.” 6.25 p.m.: Cap-
tain Donald Mac Lean has acquired one thing MOST
thrilling to inform you all. (f. 45 p.m.: Grownup birthday
greetings and programme bulletins. NIGHT
SESSION.— (Announcer: Frank Hatherley.) 7.0
p.m.: Night service from St. Paul’s Cathedral,
. Melbourne. Hymn 72 (A. and M.), “The 12 months
is Gone Past Recall.” Sentence, Exhortation.
Absolution. The Lord’s Prayer. Versicles and Re-
sponses. Psalms 96, 97, and 117. First Lesson.
Magnificat. Second Lesson. Nunc Dimittis. The
Apostles’ Creed. Collects. Hymn 75, “Earth has
Many a Noble Metropolis.” Prayers. Hymn 178, “Jesu.
the Very Considered Thee.” Sermon, the Arch-
bishop. Hymn 79, “As with Gladness Males of Previous.”
Benediction. 8.30 p.m.: The Strad Trio (Cecil
Parkes, violim Could Broderick, piano; and Frank
Johnstone, ’cello). “Op. 32 in D Minor” (Aren-
sky) Elegie, Finale. 8.43 p.m.: Myrtle Walscott
(contralto), “The Throne of Grace” (Bonheur).
“The Holy Baby” (Easthope Martin). 8.50 p.m.:
Cecil Parkes (violin). “Hymn to the Solar” (Rim-
sky-Kersakov). “Caprice No. 13” (Paganini).
“Tambonrin Chinnois” (Kreisler). 9.1 p.m.: Vio-
let Jackson (soprano). “Sanctuary” (Besley).
•‘M-n.cm when Tender Voices Die” (Besley). 9.Eight p.m.:
Kav B’-oderick (piano), “Pastorale and Canriccio”
(Scarletti). “Moto Perpetuo” (Weber). 9.16 p.m.:
Myrtle Walscott (contralto), “Slumber. Pricey Maid”
(Handel). “The Rosary” (Nevln). 9,23 p.m.: Frank
TeUnetone (’cello). “Hungarian Rhaosodv” (Pon-
ner), 9.30 p.m.: Violet Jackson Goprn.nn)
chosen. 937 p.m.: The Strad Trio. “Prelude”
(Cui). “Nouelletens No. Three and 4” (Gad®). “Ex-
tract from Brandenburg Concerto” (Bach). 950
p.m.: “Argus” information service. Bulletins. Our
Oreot Thought for to-dav. 10.Zero p.m.: God Sav»
the Wing.
3AR
MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. Stuart). 11.0
a.m.: Morning service from Central Mission, Wes-
ley Church, Lonsdale Avenue. Melbourne, carried out
bv Rev. J. H. Cain. Doxology, Invocation, hymn
“Reward My Soul, the King of Heaven,” Prayer,
Lord’s Prayer, hymn “The King of Love My Shep-
herd Is,” Scripture studying, solo, kids’s ad-
costume. anthem, bulletins and providing, hymn
“Lead. Kindly Gentle,” sermon, brief prayer, hymn
“Standing on the Portal of the Opening 12 months.”
benediction. 12.15 p.m.: Shut down. AFTER-
NOON SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. Stuart.) 3.0
p.m.: Candy solace from the Seraphina.
4.30 p.m.: Shut down. EVENING SES-
SION.—S.O p.m. Brer Rabbit. “Such Received-
dous Tales as Childhood Likes to Hear.”
5.30 p.m.: Shut down. NIGHT SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: J. Stuart.) 7.Zero p.m.: Hamilton Harty.
conducting the Halle Orchestra, symphony. “From
the New World” (Dvorak), in ten elements; Clara
Butt, contralto. “Genevieve,” “Cleaning Fires”;
Sir Henry J. Wooden and the New Queen’s Corridor Or-
chestra. “A Night time on the Naked Mountains” (Mous-
sorgsky): Capiton Zaporojetz, bass, “Music of the
Flea”; Sir Henry J. Wooden and the New Queen’s
Corridor Orchestra, overture, “Leonore. No 3,” elements
1 and a couple of (Beethoven): the Kedroff Quartette (Rus-
sian singers), unaccompanied, “Olaf Trigwason,”
Norwegian ballade, “Circassian Music”: Sir Henry
J. Wooden and the New Queen’s Corridor Orchestra,
“Leonore, No. 3,” elements Three and 4 (Beethoven):
Chaliapin, bass. “The Moon is Excessive within the Sky.”
“Loopy-headed John.” 8.46 p.m.: Interval. A. S.
Kenyon, “Ethnology of the Australian Aboriginal,”
continued. 9.1 p.m.: Felix Weingartner and the
Roval Philharmonic Orchestra, “Symphony, No. 6”
(“Pastoral”) (Beethoven), in ten elements; Clara
Butt, contralto, “The Rosary,” “Down by the
Riverside I Stray”; Sir Hamilton Harty and fhe
Halle Orchestra, “A Trumpet Voluntary” (for
brass and organ (Purcell); Ben Davies, tenor, “Tom
Bowling,” “Come Into the Backyard, Maud” (Balke);
Philharmonic String Quartet, “Gavotte” (Thomas),
“Spring Music” (Mendelssohn). 9.47 p.m.: Information;
bulletins. 9.58 p.m.: Our Shakespearean
good-night citation. 10.Zero p.m.: “God Save the
King.”
4QG
MORNING SESSION.—II.O a.m.: Promenade St. Andrew’s
Church of England—Morning service. 12.15 p.m.:
Shut down. SESSION.—3.IS p.m.:
From the Botanic Gardens, Band Live performance. 4.30
p.m.: Shut down. EARLY EVENING SESSION.—
6.30 p.m.: A session for little listeners. Greetings
and replies to letters. NIGHT SESSION.—7.O p.m.:
Promenade St. Andrew’s Church of England—Kids’s
Service. 7.30 p.m.: Night service. Municipal
Live performance Band, from Wickham Park. 9.30 p.m.:
Shut down.
5CL
MORNING SESSION. —(Announcer: Athol Lykke. i
10.45 a.m.: Carillon of bells from Adelaide City
Corridor. 11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 11.1 a.m.: Divine
service from Maughan Church. Franklin Avenue,
carried out by Rev. W. H. Cann. sermon by Rev. D.
Anneal*. From the studio. 12.15 p.m.: British
Official wi-fi information. 12.20 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.—3.O p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
A recital of Russian music, H.M.V. recordings.
The London Symphony Orchestra, carried out by
Albert Coates, “Le Coq d’Or” (“The Golden
Rooster”) (Rimsky-Korsakov), “Prince Igor,” bal-
let music, with refrain (Borodin); the Russian
State Choir, “Storm on the Volga” (Patschenlco);
Chaliapin, basso, “The Pronhet,” Op. 49 (Rimsky-
Korsakov), “Music of the Volga Boatmen” (tradi-
tional); Pablo Casals, ’cellist. “Melody in F”
(Rubenstein); Caruso, tenor, “Pourqoi?”
(Tschaikowsky); Renee Chemet. violinist, ‘ oc-
turne in C Sharp Minor,” Op. 19, No. 4 (Tschai-
kowskv); Alfred Cortot, pianist, “Etude Pathe-
tique,” Op. 8 (Scriabin). “Prelude in C Sharp
Minor” (Rachmaninoff): Russian Symphonic Choir,
“Lord Have Mercy” (hymn): “Volga. Boat Music”
(conventional); F. Kreisler, violinist, “Dance Arabe”
(Rimsky-Korsakov), “Dance Orientale” (Rimsky-
Korsakov). 4.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. NIGHT
SESSlON.—(Announcer: Athol Lykke. Accompan-
iste: Jean Finlay.) 6.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 6.1
p.m.: S.A.R. info. 6.2 p.m.: Kids’s
completely happy moments, songs and tales and greetings
by Aunty Peggy. 6.25 p.m.: Carillon of bells from
Adelaide City Corridor. 6.35 p.m.: The Chicken Woman
and the Sunshine Songsters, in hymns and ethical
tales. 7.Zero p.m.: Chimes. 7.1 p.m.: A spiritual
service, relayed from Stow Memorial Church;
Prayer. Lord’s Prayer, hymn “Standing on the Por-
tal,” Scripture, prayer, anthem, hymn “O ,God
Our Assist,” New 12 months’s message by Rev. Dr
Wright, hymn “Thy Kingdom Come,” benediction
From the studio. Orchestral and vocal live performance
8.20 p.m.: Station Orchestra, overture “Raymond”
(ThotnaS’). 8.29 p.m.: Linda Wald, soprano. “The
Attraction of Spring” (Clarke). “Caprice” (Purcell).
8.34 p.m,: Stanley A. Brown, trombone soloist.
8.40 p.m.: Frank M’Cabe, baritone. “Grey Days”
(Johnson). “Dervis Vigil” (Valmore). 8.46 p.m.:
Station Orchestra, in a descriptive quantity, swimsuit”
“African” (Ring). 8.52 p.m.: Herbert King, tenor.
“La Donna e Cellular” (Verdi), “Nita Gitana”
(Newton). 8.58 p.m.: Lizette Foglia, violinist.
“Rondo” (Mozart). 9.Three p.m.: Linda Wald, so-
prano, “Ave Maria” (Dubois), “Songs My Mom
Taught Me” (Dvorak). 9.9 p.m.: Station Orches-
tra, “Two Tzigini Dances” (Bond). 9.16 p.m.:
Frank M’Cabe. baritone, “In a Backyard” (Hawle-“‘
“Harlequin” (Sanderson). 9.22 p.m.: Station Or-
chestra. choice, “The Scholar Prince” (Rom-
berg). 9.30 p.m..* Herbert King, tenor, “Umbra Mai
FU” (Handel), “Agnes Dei” (Bizet), with violin
obbligato by Lizette Foglia. 9.36 p.m.: Station Or-
chestra, suite “Vive la Danse” (Fuick). 9.45 p.m.:
P. H. Nicholls. an handle. “Starting Once more.”
9.59 p.m.: Meteorological info. 10.Zero p.m.:
G.P.O. chimes: our good-night thought. 10.1 p.m.:
“God Save the King.”

O’Donnell, Griffin, & Co Advert[edit]

TRANSFORMERS.
Constructed as much as a specification and wound,
lamination iron reduce to any dimension from inventory.
Costs and estimates on software.
O’DONNELL, GRIFFIN, & CO., LTD.,
53 Druitt Avenue, Sydney.
’Telephones: M 2991 (Three strains).

W. Furness Advert[edit]

W. FURNESS,
Ist Flooring, Furness Chambers,
KING’S CROSS, DARLINGHURST.
Shields, Coils, and all Element Elements
as used within the Examined 1928 Solodyne.
Coils are assured to correct specifi-
cation.
Shields assembled if desired.
Phrases could also be organized.

P.33 – Amalgamated Wi-fi (A/asia) Advert[edit]

Marconi
Speaker
and Valve
Competitors
Following are the prize-winners in
reference to the Marconi Valve
and Speaker Competitors:
(FIRST), Money Prize, £25.
Miss M. G. Smith, 18 Bon view Roar),
MALVERN, VIC.
(SECOND) Money Prize, £lO.
Okay. H. MacFarlane, 131 Bell Avenue.
COBURG, VIC.
(THIRD) Marconi Loud Speaker,
valued at £5.
Mrs. Osborn, “Stonycroft,” UPPER
BEACONSFIELD, VIC.
SIXTEEN CONSOLATION PRIZES,
G. Roberts, 10G Arthur Avenue,
NORTH SYDNEY.
L. Richardson, 370 Orrong Street,
CAULFIELD, VIC.
W. P. Whyte, Heather Avenue, WIL-
STON, BRISBANE.
R. Hopper, 11 Holmes Avenue, EAST
BRUNSWICK, VIC.
Miss H. Grey, BILPIN, N.S.W.
W. T. Lapthorn, 13 Bent Avenue,
BENTLETGH, 5.E.14, VIC.
D. Harkness, ALEXANDRA, VIC.
J. A. Witham, 15 Dinsdale Avenue,
ALBERT PARK, VIC.
Miss M. Hiller, Ronald Avenue, DEV-
ONPORT, TAS.
C. S. Holroyd, 6 Normanby Avenue,
CAULFIELD, VIC.
Margaret M. Fraser, “Crossmyloof,”
Weybridge Avenue. SURREY HILLS,
VIC.
Mrs. H. F. Ford, WYNYARD, TAS.
W. Lewis, Corawa, WEST COAST,
S.A.
Mrs. W. R. Horrell, 5 Northumber-
land Avenue, CLOVELLY, N.S.W.
Miss B. Stephenson, 34 Neerim Street.
CAULFIELD, VIC.
Miss Rita Jolly, 5 Dorset Avenue.
COLLIGHT GARDENS, S.A.
The well-known Marconi Economj Valves
and Audio system are obtainable from all
Radio Sellers.
Amdqa^g^reless
u itrala s i a) ~£td-
Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide,
and Wellington, N.Z.

P.34 – Native Programmes, Monday, January 7[edit]

Native Programmes, Monday, January 7
2FC
MORNING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 10.2
a.m.: Pianoforte choice. 10.10 a.m.:
“Sydney Morning Herald’ information service
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.: A
speak by the 2FC racing commissioner. 10.45
a.m. :A chat on house cooking and recipes
by Miss Ruth Furst. 11 a.m.: “Massive Ben”;
A.P.A. and Reuter’s cable companies. 11.5
a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
(Announcer: A. S Cochrane.)
12 midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 12. i
p.m.: Inventory Trade, first name. 12.Three p.m.
Official climate forecast, rainfall. 12.5
p.m.: Studio music. 12.10 p.*–
of reports, “Sydney Morning Herald.” 12.15
p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18 pm-
A studying. 12.30 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Geelong
performed at Geelong. 12.45 p.m.: Studio
music. 1 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; climate intelli-
gence. 1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” noon
information service; Producers’ Distributing So-
cietyls report. 1.20 p.m.: Studio music
1.28 p.m.: Inventory Trade, second name.
1.30 p.m.: Common Studio music. 1.57 p.m.-
Cricket scores. 2 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; shut
down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert).
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Recital of chosen data of world
well-known artists. Three p.m.: “Massive- Ben”; piano-
forte copy. 3.15 p.m.: Common
music. 3.30 p.m.: Florence Roache, sonrano
3.37 p.m.; Winifred M’Bride, contralto. 3.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v Geelonp
plaved at Geelong: Miss B Macaulay will
proceed her collection of talks “Your’ Son:
The Heritage of the Current Boy.” Four p.m.:
“Massive Ben”; Florence Roache, soprano. 4.7
p.m.: From the Wentworth, the Wentworth
Cafe Dance Orchestra, carried out by
Jimmy Elkins. 4.20 p.m.: From the Studio.
Winifred M’Bride, contralto. 4.27 p.m.:
Common music. 4.35 p.m.: From the
Wentworth, the Wentworth Cafe Dance
Orchestra, carried out by Jimmy Elkins. 4.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Geelong
plaved at Geelong; third name of the Inventory
Trade. 4.47 p.m.: Studio music. 5
p.m.: “Massive Ben”; shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S Cochrane.)
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.: The youngsters’s session, carried out
by the “Whats up Man”: letters and tales:
music and leisure.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgetv’s market studies (wool
wheat, and inventory).
6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6.42 oni : inventory Trade info.
6.45 p.m.: Climate and shipoine information.
6.Four R n.m.: Rugby wi-fi information
6.50 p.m.: Late sporting information.
7 p.m.: “Massive Ben”: late information service.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartet, con-
ducted bv Horace Keats.
(a) “Intermezzo Trlandais” (Leigh).
(b) “La Leson.iera” (Chaminade).
(c) “The Vagabond King” (Friml).
(d> “Chanson Napolitaine” (d’Ambrosio).
(e) Fox trot.
EVENING SESSION
(Announcers Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie)
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte copy
7.53 p.m.: Common music.
Eight p.m.: “Massive Ben.” From the Lvceum The-
atre, the Lvceum Theatre Orchestra, con-
ducted by Frank M’Cann.
8.2 n nm.: From the Studio, John Mitchell,
tenor.
8.27 p.m.: Gentle Music 4, instrumental-
ists, “Brahmsiana” (arr. Langey).
8.37 p.m.: Clarice Coles, contralto.
(a) “How Pretty are Thy Dwellings”
(Liddle).
(b) “None however the Weary Coronary heart”
(Tschaikowsky).
8.44 p.m.: Gentle Music 4, instrumental-
ists, choice, “Paul Jones” (Planquette).
8.54 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
9.1 p.m.: Climate report and forecast.
9.2 p.m.: Lucille Bruntnell will communicate on
“The nation of England.”
9.17 p.m.: From the Lyceum Theatre, the
Lyceum Theatre Orchestra, carried out by
Frank M’Cann.
9.37 p.m.: From the Studio, A. G. MacDon-
ald, baritone.
(a) “The Land of the Harlequinade”
(Oliver).
(b) “A Dream” (Bartlett).
9.44 p.m.: Gentle Music 4, instrumentalists
(a) “Three Songs” (Strauss).
(b) “Intermezzo” (Strauss).
10 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; John Mitchell, tenor.
10.7 p.m.: Clarice Coles, contralto.
(a) “O Western Wind” (Brahe).
(b) “Nonetheless because the Night time” (Bohm).
(c) “Vale” (Russell).
10.14 p.m.: Gentle Music 4, instrumental-
ists, “First Suite” (Carmen), (Bizet).
10.27 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme.
1 0.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut.
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; information service
from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25
a.m.: Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes; studio music. 8.35 a.m.: In-
formation, mails, delivery, arrivals, depar-
tures, and sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information ser-
vice from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.’
8.45 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; studio
music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
studio music.. 9.30 a.m.: Half an hour
with silent pals. 10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes; shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Ladies’s Sports activities Affiliation session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Ladies’s ses-
sion, carried out by Mrs. Cranfield. 12 midday:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular ocean
forecast §.nd climate report. 12.Three p.m.:
Studio music. 12.30 p.m.: Transport and
mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market studies. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Geelong,
performed at Geelong. 12.48 p.m.: “Solar” mid-
day information service. 1 p.m.: Studio music.
Discuss to kids and particular leisure
for kids in hospital. 1.57 p.m.: Cricket
scores, England v. Geelong, performed at Gee-
lengthy. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
cricket scores, England v. Geelong, performed
at Geelong. 3.47 p.m.: Studio music.
3.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orchestra, con-
ducted by Bennie Abrahams. Four p.m.: The
chimes of the G.P.O. clock; Thelma Lovett,
soprano—(a) “Tip Toe” (Carew), (b) “Poor
Man’s Backyard” (Russell). 4.7 p.m.: Cap-
tain Fred Aarons, Thriller Collection —“The
World Destroyer.’ 4.20 p.m.: Romano’s
Dance Orchestra, carried out by Bennie
Abrahams. 4.30 p.m.: Laurie Oaks, bari-
tone. 4.37 p.m.: Thelma Lovett, soprano—
(a) “That All” (Brahe), (b) “The Valley,
of Laughter” (Sanderson). 4.44 p.m.: “Solar”
information service—cricket scores. 4.50 p.m.:
Romano’s Dance Orchestra, carried out by
Bennie Abrahams. 5 p.m.: The chimes
of the G.P.O. clock; “Our Serial Story.”
5.10 p.m. Laurie Oaks, baritone. 5.17 p.m.:
Pianoforte copy. 5.35 p.m.: Racing
resume. 5.37 p.m.: Options of the even-
ing’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcers: J. Knight Barnett and Basil
Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session—
Music and leisure.
Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet —
2GB
a.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss Heien J.
by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music. j 0.30
p.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss He’en J.
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.:.Shut down 2 Zero p.m.:
Music. 2.5 p.m.: Ladies’s radio service, by
Mrs. Dorothy Jordan; Pat Hansen sports activities
speak. 2.50 p.m.: Music. 3.Zero p.m.: Discuss. 3.15
p.m.: Shut down. 5.30 p.m.. Kids’s
session, by Uncle George. 7.Zero p.m.- Inventory
and market studies, by New Zealand Mortgage
and Mercantile Company, Ltd. 7,15 p.m.:
Music. 8.Zero p.m.

P.35 – Interstate Programmes, Monday, January 7[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Monday, January 7
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.IS a.m.: Specific
prepare info. 7.16 a.m.; Morning melodies.
7.20 a.m.: Morning workout routines to music: 7.30 a.m.:
Inventory reoorts; market studies; basic, information: ship-
ping, sporting info. 8.Zero a.m.: Melbourne
Observatory time sign. 8.1 a.m.: Mortjihg melo-
dies. 8.15: Shut down. MORNING SESSION.—
(Announcer: C. J. O’Connor.) 11.Zero a.m.: 3LO’s
completely different dainties for the dailv dinner; to-day’s
radio recipe, 11,5 a,m.: Miss. Olga Parker: “What
Some Well-known Poets Haye Written for Kids —.
Tennyson.” 11.20 a.m.: Musical interlude. 11.26
a.m.: Below the auspices of the St. John Ambu-
lance Affiliation. Miss Edith Wells will communicate on
“Residence Nursing.” 11.Four Q: Gramonhone recital of
the newest data. MIU-OAy SESSION.—I 2 midday:
Melbourne Observatory time sign; exDress prepare
info; Reuter’s aqd the Australian Press
Affiliation cables: “Argus” information service. 12.15
p.m.: Newmarket inventory gross sales; particular report by
John M’Namara and Co. 1.45 p.m.: Inventory Trade
info; meteorological info; climate
forecast for Victoria. Tasmania, New South Wales,
and South) Australia:, ocean forecasts; rainfall;
river studies. 1.55 0.m.: Shut down. AFTER-
NOON SFSSTOISf.— (Announcer: C. J. O’Connor.
Accompanist, e: Agnes Fortune.) 2.15 p.m.: The
Station Orchestra, fantasie. “Marionetten” (Au-
ber). 2,25 p.m.: Jessie Smith, contralto. “Thou
Artwork Risen. My Beloved (Coleridge-Taylor); “Oh!
That It Have been So” (Frank Bridge). 2.32 p.m.:
Bertha Jorgensen. violin, “Sluggish Motion”
(Tschaikowskv). 2.40 p.m.: The Station Orches-
tra, “Allegretto. Op. 164” (Schubert). “Vecchio”
(Sgambati). 2.50 p.m.: Herbert Browne, tenor,
2.57 P.m.: Tasma Tiernan. ’cello. “Abendlied”
(Schumann). 3.Four p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano,
“The place Violets Develop” (Forster). “To a Miniature”
(Brahe). 3.11 n.m,: The Station Orchestra. “Alle-
gretto, Dp. 8” (Grieg), “Toreador” (Rubinstein).
3.21 p.m.: “Breaking the Ice.” Solid: Captain
Selby, Cbas. R. Dvson; Maripn, Mrs. Maurice Dud-
ley. 3.41 p.m.: The Station Orchestra, fantasie.
“Au Hofe” (Rossini). 3.51 p.m.: Jessie Smith,
contralto. “Love Got here Callihg.” “When You Are
Previous” (Sanderson). 3.58 p.m.: The Station Orches-
tra, “Symphony in E Flat Main.” first and second
motion (Haydn). 4.Eight p.m.: Percy Code, trum-
pet. “Someplace a Voice is Calling.” 4.13 p.m.:
Herbert Browne, tenor. 4.20 P.m.: The Station
Orchestra, “Symphony in E Flat Main,” third
and fourth actions (Haydn). 4.30 p.m.: Violet
Jackson, soprano, “Early One Morning” (Previous Eng-
lish). “I Try from Love’s. Illness to Fly”
(Purcell). 4.37 p.m.: Sonora recital, “The Eroica
Symphony,” bv Beethoven. 5.Zero p.m.: “Herald”
information service: Inventory Trade info: accep-
tances for the Woodend races on Wednesday.
January 9. Throughout the afternoon progress ®scores
within the cricket match. England, v. Geelong, can be
broadcast as they arrive handy, 5.15 p.m.: Closp
down. EVENING SESSION.— (Announcer: Frank
Hatherley.) 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions to letters and
birthday greetings by “Bobby Bluegum.” 6.25 p.m.:
Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m.: Donald MacL°an,
“Extra Pirate Tales.” 6.50 n.m.: “Bobbv Blue-
gum,” in music and story. NIGHT SESSION.—
(Announcer: John Stuart. Accompaniste, Agnes
Fortune.) 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Trade info.
7.15 p.m.: Particular report of John M’Nama’-a and
Co.: official report of the Newmarket inventory gross sales
bv the Related Inventory and Station Brokers, Bourke
Avenue. Melbourne: fish market studies by J. R.
Barrett, Ltd.: rabbit costs: river studies:’ market
studies by the Victorian Producers’ Co-operative
Co, Ltd.; poultry, grain, hay. straw, jute, dairy
produce, potatoes, and onions: market studies of
fruit bv the Victorian Fruiterers’ Affiliation: re-
tail costs: wholesale costs of fruit by the Entire-
sale Fruit Retailers’ Affiliation- citrus fmits.
7.30 P.m.: Information session. 7.Four 3p.m.: Birthday
greetings. 7.45 p.m.: “Out of the Previous.” 7,46
p.m.: Below the auspices of the Division of
Agriculture, T. A. J. Smith, tobacco skilled, wi ll
communicate on “Tobacco Tradition—Seasonable Hints.”
8.Zero p.m.: “A Maker of Historical past.” First act of
the pantomime stunning. “Dick Whittington and
His Cat.” Course: William Anderson. Solid of
characters-—lmmortals: Demon King Rat. Darvall
Thomas: Fairy Queen Cat. Florence Sutherland:
Spirit of the Dance. Kathleen Butler. Mortals:
Dick Whittington (a lad with out pals and with-
out cash), Ida Newton: Alice Fitzwarren (a lass
who’s sweeter than hopey). Mae Seaton: Dame
Wattleblossom (a crafty previous satan, a sneaking
previous cat), Joe R’-ennan: Idle Jack (a lazy younger
rascal, an actual idle brat). A. G. Scry: Baron Fitz-
warren (the daddy of Alice, of this vou all know)
B, S. Monti: The Cat (Dick’s solely good friend in weal
or in woe). Theo. Foster; Sultan of Morocco (a
nice notentate. with riches galore). Darvall Tho-
mas; Chamberlain (who takes care of the harem
of women a rating). Jack Hodges: Tom, Grasp at
Hounds (an amazing favourite with the women). J°a”
Cookesley. Act 1. Scene 1: “King of the Rats.”
The Demon King: “Love Shall Conauer,” Fairy
Queen. Cat. and Demon, Beene IT- “A Truce to
Work,” basic ensemble: “Don’t Be Merciless to a
Vegetabuel.” Dame Wattleblossom: “Let a Smile B»
Your Umbrella.” Alice Fitzwarren: “That’s What
Makes Me Love Her,” Baron Fitzwarren; “Tumble-
down Cottage of Goals,” Dick Whittington;
“Turning Hassle? into Bubbles.” basic ensemble.
Scene III.: “A Coronary heart That’s Free.” Fairy Queen
Cat: “Wobbly Stroll.” Grasp at Hounds; “Golden
Goals” (duet). Dick and Alice. Scene IV.:
“Outlets Shons,” basic ensemble: “Gadabout
Mumma.” Idle Jack; “Rag Doll Snecialtv,” The
Tiny Tots: “Lonesome within the Moonlight,” Dick;
“Piccaninnies’ Lullaby,” Alice and Jimmy Dun-
stan: “What’s All This Row About?” basic en-
semble. Scene V.: “Get Out and Get Below the
Moon,” Grasp at Hounds: “If” (topical trio),
Dame. Baron, and Idle Jack. Scene VI.: “Looking,
Looking.” Grasp at Hounds: “Th° Rodent King,”
King Rat: “Cat Specialty,” The Cat and Kittens;
“Leaf Ballet,” dancing ensemble; “Flip Once more,”
invisible refrain; “Lord Mayor of London,” basic
ensemble. 9.15 p.m.: Capt. Donald Mac Lean,
“Pirates of the Previous.” 9.30 p.m.: The Station Or-
chestra, “First Mosaique” (Mozart). 9.40 p.m.:
Molly Mac Kay, soprano, “Ma Voisone” (Thomas).
“The Forsaken Maid” (Sensible). 9.47 p.m.: The
Station Trio, motion from “Trio” (Mozart).
9.57 p.m.: Man Moore, tenor, “The Boat Music”
(Ware), “Have You Seen However a White Lily Develop.”
10.Four p.m.: “Argus” information service: meteorological
info; bulletins. 10-14 p.m..: The
Station Orchestra, choice, “Eugene Onegin”
(Tsc.haikowsky). 10.24 p.m.: Molly Mac Kay and
Man Moore, soprano and tenor, duet from “Faust”
(Gounod), duet from “Romeo and Juliet” (Gou-
nod). 10.51 p.m.: The Station Orchestra, choice,
“Hit the Deck” (Youmans). 10.36 p.m.: Syd. Hol-
lister, comic, “Comicalities.” 10.45 p.m.: The
Station Orchestra, chosen. 10.50 p.m.: Syd. Hol-
lister, comic, “The Newest.” 10.55 p.m.: An-
nouncements. 10.58 p.m.: Our nice thought for
to-day. 11.Zero p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Ups and
Downs” (Rose). “Mississippi Mud” (Harris), “Day
Goals” (Hallam). “Jeannine” (Gilbert).’ “Dream
Home” (Foxe); “Tiger Rag” (Moore), “That’s My
Weak spot Now” (Stept), “Get Out and Get Below
the Moon” (Tobias), “Sleepy Child” (Kahn). “The
Prune Music” (Crumit), “Sincerely I Do” (Davis),
“Sally Rose” (Pal),’ “Good-night Waltz” (Bibo),
“Good-night Refrain.” 11.40 p.m.: “God Save the
King.
3AR
E?change C |°report y Four ToSdon “meta?’ marked
1.0.10 a – m – : A S? market studies—Farm and sta-
tion produce, fruit, fish, greens, and so forth. 10.25
a – m – : delivery studies; ocean forecast. 10.30
a -m- : Mail notices; categorical prepare info.
10.35 a.m.; Age” information service, unique to 3AR.
• 10.59 a.m.: Climate forecast. (Announcer: C. M
Hosking.) 11.Zero a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
Meet Me To-day (Dean), “As soon as Once more” (Lums-
daine), “Drained Palms” (Woods), “To Busy” (Mili-
ler), “Candy Sue, Simply You” (Tobias), “In a Bam-
boo Backyard” (Donaldson). 11.20 a.m.: Vocal viva-
metropolis. 11.25 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Any-
factor You say” (Donaldson), “Lonely Acres” (Rob-
inson), “Shake It Down” (Williams), “New to
i *jike Me Subsequent to You” (Bito), “What Was
ITo Do (Reid), “Chinatown” (Yvain). 11.45 a.m.-
Vocal vivacity. 11.50 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces—“ The Riff Music” (Romberg), “The Dance of
the Blue Danube’ (Fisher), “A Lonesome Boy’s
Rosary” (Tobias), “Excessive Up On a Hill Prime”
(Baer), “Inform Me Once more” (Clark), “Up and Down”
(Rose). 12 (midday): Vocal vivacity. 12.5 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Mississippi Mud”
(Harris), “Lolita” (Stoneham), “With out You,
V-^ eet ~r t” f .s e Sj lva ). “Dream Kisses” (Yellen),
Lenora (Gilbert). 12.25 p.m.: British official
wi-fi information. 12.35 p.m.: Vocal vivacity 12 40
p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Virginia Creeper”
(Wade), “Little Log Cabin of Goals” (Henley)
“Blissful-go-lucky Lane” (Lewis), “All Day Lengthy”’
(Cross), “Don’t Preserve Me within the Darkish, Vibrant
Eyes” (Bryan), “Down The place the Solar Goes Down”
(Jones). 12:50 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 12.55 pm-
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Dolores” (Kassell)’,
“Mine, All Mine” (Ruby), “Rain” (Ford), “Simply
Like a Melody Out of the Sky” (Donaldson), “Be-
trigger My Child Don’t Imply Perhaps Now” (Donald-
son). 1.15 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 1.30 p.m.- New
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Guess Who’s in City”
(Razay), “My Blackbirds are Bluebirds’ Now”
(Pal), “Louisiana” (Schafer). 1.30 p.m.: Shut
down. EVENING SESSlON—(Announcer: Frank
Hatherley.) 6.Zero p.m.: Choices from the reper-
toires of the Grasp Musicians. 7.50 p.m • Re-
sults of Check match, England v. Geelong, at Gee-
lengthy. NIGHT SESSlON—(Announcer: Frank Hath-
erley.) 8.Zero p.m.: E. C. H. Taylor, “College Life and
College Sport.” 8.15 p.m.: T. Latham, president
of the Historic Society of Victoria, on “The Goals
and Objects of the Proposed Historic Exhibition.”
8.30 p.m.: Alfred Firman, “Books of Yesterday, To-
day, and To-morrow.” 8.45 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces—“Blueberry Land” (Bryan), “Deli-
rium” (Schutt), “Felix the Cat” (Naustraum).
8.55 p.m.: Keith Desmond, “Pithy Pleasantries.”
8.58 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Polly” (Za-
mocnik), “Again’in Your Personal Yard” (Jolson),
“Let a Smile be Your Umbrella” (Truthful). 9.Eight p.m.-
John Byrne, bass, “The Previous Black Mare” (Squire)
9.11 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Inform Me To-
evening” (Little), “When You Know Me” (Baden)
“I’m Sorry, Sally” (Kahn). 9.21 p.m.: Rosalind
Hartnqng, contralto, “The Little Silver Ring”
(Chaminade). 9.24 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces
—“Dream Home” (Fox), “Jeannine” (Gilbert)
“Crimson Head” (Ermbey). 9.34 p.m.: Keith Des-
mond, “Wild and Witty.” 9.37 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces—“Rose of Monterey” (Man), “Senti-
psychological Child” (Davis), “In My Bouquet of Memo-
ries” (Lewis). 9.47 p.m.: John Byrne, bass. “Sel-
ected.” 9.50 p.m.: Bulletins. 5.53 p.m.: Ned
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Jazz Grasp—Piano Solo”
(Mayerel), “Hum and Strum” (Meyere), “Don’t
Cry, Child” (Kahn). 10.Three p.m.: Rosalind Hart-
nung, contralto, “That’s All” (Brahe). 10.6 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Constantinople” (Carl-
ton), “That Melody of Love” (Donaldson), “Any-
factor You Say” (Donaldson), “In a Bamboo Gar-
den” (Donaldson), “We’ll Have a New Residence within the
Morning” (Buck). 10.20 p.m.: “Age” information ser-
vice, unique to 3AR; outcomes of Check cricket
England V. Geelong, at Geelong; bulletins.
10.29: Our Shakeipearian Good-night Citation is
from “Othello”; -‘Good identify in man or girl,
pricey my Lord, is the quick jewel of their
souls. Who steals my purse, steals trash; ’tis
one thing, nothing. ’Twas mine, ’tis his, and has
been slave to hundreds; however he that filches from
me my good identify robs me of that which not en-
riches him, and makes me poor certainly.” 10.30
p.m.: God Save the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. Ty-
scn.) 7.43 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information
service. 8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical data. 8.15
a.m.: Information service. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down. MORN-
ING SESSION. — (Announcer: Rita M’Auliffe.)
11.Zero a.m.: Music. 11.5 a.m.: Social information. 11.15
a.m.: Lecturette organized by the Nationwide Council
of Ladies of Queensland. 11.30 a.m.: Music. 11.35
а. Extra social information. 11.45 a.m.: From the
Wintergarden Theatre—Wurlitzer organ. 12.0
Midday: Shut down. MID-DAY SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: R. Wight.) 1.Zero p.m.: Market studies and
climate info. 1.20 p.m.: Lunch-hour
music. 2.Zero p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SES*
SION.— (Announcer: H. Humphreys.) 3.Zero p.m.:
A program”‘ e of electrically reproduced data.
3.30 p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances. 4.15 p.m.:
This after”on’s information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcers: R.
Wight and H. Humphreys.) 6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare
operating instances; mail info; delivery information.
б. p.m.: Some electrically reproduced data.
6.25 p.m.: Business bulletins. The Baby-
ren’s Hour. 6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, carried out
by “The Sandman.” 7.Zero p.m.: -Information in short.
7.5 p.m.: Inventory Trade information. 7.6 p.m.: Steel
quotations. 7.7 p.m.: Market studies. 7.25 p.m.:
Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate in-
formation. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins. 7.43 p.m.:
Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lecturette, “ p °rk
Merchandise on the Breakfast Menu.” NIGHT SES-
SlON.— (Announcer: H. Humphreys.) 8.Zero p.m.:
The Studio Orchestra (Conductor, A’. R. Feather-
stone)—Choice, “The Mikado” (Gilbert and Sul-
livan). 8.10 p.m.: Harry Humphreys—A studying
from Charles Dickens: “Incidents within the brief raise
of Paul Dombey” (from “Dombey and Son”). 8.25
p.m.: The Aloha Novelty Trio—“ln An Previous-fash-
ioned City” (Squire). 8.30 p.m.: Eileen M’Lennan
(soprano), “Ave Maria” (Gounod). 8.35 P-in>j
The Studio Orchestra —Choice, “The Geisha
(Sydney Jones). 8.45 p.m.: George Williamson
(tenor), “Crimson Devon,” “Parted” (Tosti). 8.52,
p.m.: Aeolian Vocation Choices—Two Wurlitzer
organ solos. 9.Zero n’.m.: Metropolitan climate fore-
solid. 9.1 p.m.: Jill Manners (soprano)—“ll Bac-
cio” (Arditi), “Love Will Discover a Manner” (Fraser
Simpson). 9.9 p.m.: The Aloha Trio—“ Hawaiian
Sundown,” “Music of Hawaii.” _ 9.14 p.m.: Stanley
Tamblyn (baritone), “Rocked m the Cradle of the
Deep,” “The Star of Bethlehem.” 9.20 P-m.-J.
Tyson, some accordeon solos. 9.25 p.m.. E^en
M’Lennan (soprano). “Lak Jeem. JH 1 ?” Tg?
Studio Orchestra— “Tangled Tunes” (Ketelby). 9.33
p.m.: Arthur Sharman (pianist). Autumn (Cha-
minade). 9.43 P.m.: Aeolian Vocation—’The an-
nouncer at W.G.’N. describing the motor races at
Atlantic Metropolis Speedway. 9.51 P-m.. The Studio
Orchestra—Choice. Lilac Time (Schubert).
10.Zero p.m.: The “Day by day Mail information, the Courier
information; w T eather information.
5CL
MORNING SESSION. 11.Zero annn G.P.O. U.I
Band of hiTMajesty’s Coldstream Gua °*g*j[j*
S S &v^ e “S e^ice S »ch^ e
11 15 a.m.- “Economist,” a talk on menu and kit-
chen craft 11-30 a.m.: Vocal, pianoforte, and
chamber music, H.M.V. recordings Bennp Moisel-
vitch, Pianist. “Impromptu m F Sharp
“Peroetuum Mobile (Weber) 12-15 Ariams) 7
Coltham. tenor. “Star of Bethlehem Mams ,
“The Minstrel Boy,” “Tom Bowling
Virtuoso String Quartet. “Quartette m D Major,
first movement Poco Lanto- —Allegro—Poco Lanto,
second movement Scherzo—Vivace, tmrd.m

P.36 – Local Programmes, Tuesday, January 8[edit]

Native Programmes, Tuesday, January 8
2FC
Tuesday, January 8.
early morning session
V a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins 7 5
a.m.: Studio music. 7.20 a.m.: Nation
session; official climate forecast, rainfall,
temperatures, astronomical memoranda,
delivery intelligence, mail companies, river
studies. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market;
mining sharemarket, steel quotations. 7.35
a.m.. Wool gross sales, breadstuffs markets, in-
ter-State markets, produce markets. ‘ 7.45
a.m.: Sydney Morning Herald” abstract.
7.50 a.m.: Studio music. Eight a.m.: “Massive Ben”-
shut down.
MORNING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 10.2
a.m.: Pianoforte copy. 10.10 a.m.:
‘ Sydney Morning Herald” information service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.: Final
minute sporting info by the 2FC
racing commissioner. 10.40 a.m.: Studio
music. 10.50 a.m.: Pianoforte reproduc-
tion 11 a.m.: “Massive Ben”; A.P.A. and
Reuter’s cables. 11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
Notice.—Race outcomes.
MIDDAY SESSION
(Announcer- A. S. Cochrane.)
12 midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 12.1
p.m.: Inventory Trade, first name. 12.Three p.m.:
Official climate forecast, .rainfall. 12 5
p.m.: Studio music. 12.10 p.m.: Abstract
of reports, “Sydney Morning Herald.” 12.15
p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18 p.m.:
A studying. 12.30 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Geelong
performed at Geelong. 12.47 p.m.: Studio
music. 1 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; climate intel-
ligence. 1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” noon
service; Producers’ Distributing Society’s
report. 1.20 p.m.: Studio music. 1.28 p.m.:
Inventory Trade, second name. 1.30 p.m.:
Studio music. 1.57 p.m.: Cricket scores.
2 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.) .
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Recital of chosen data of world
well-known artists. Three p.m.: “Massive Ben”; piano-
forte copy. 3.15 p.m.: Common
music. 3.30 p.m.: Bessie Magner, contralto.
3.37 p.m.: Eric Cox, boy soprano: 3.45
p.m.: From the Lyceum the Ly-
ceum Theatre Orchestra, carried out by
Frank M‘Cann. Four p.m.: “Massive Ben.” From
the Studio, Bessie Magner, contralto. 4.7
p.m.: William Krasnik, violinist, (a) “Valse
Triste” (Alfred Hill), (b) “Second Ro-
mance’ (Schumann-Monk). 4.14 p.m.:
From the Wentworth, The Wentworth Cafe
Dance Orchestra, carried out by Jimmie El-
kins. 4.34: From the Studio, Eric Cox, boy
soprano. 4.31: William Krasnik, violinist (a)
“Ballet Music from Rosamunde” (Kreis-
ler), (b) “Duck” (Hill). 4.38 p.m.: Popu-
lar music. 4.45 p.m.: Third name of the
Inventory Trade. 4.47 p.m.: Studio music.
5 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC.
6 15 p.m.: The Kids’s Session, carried out
oy the “Whats up Man”; letters and tales;
music and leisure.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market studies; wool,
wheat and inventory.
6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6.43 p.m.: Inventory Trade info.
6.45 p.m.: Climate and delivery information.
6.48 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
6.50 p.m.: Late sporting information.
7 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; late information service.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartet, con-
ducted by Horace Keats.
(a) “Crimson Poppies” (Elliott).
(b) “L’heure Supreme” (Lotter).
(c) “Meditation” (Gillet).
(d) “Merrie England’ (German).
(e) “Passepied” (Delibes).
(f) Fox trot.
EVENING SESSION
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte copy.
7.53 p.m.: Common music.
Eight p.m.: “Massive Ben.” From the Dee Why
Theatre, live performance programme organized by
the Dee Why and District Choral Society.
8.5 p.m.: (1) Refrain, “The Carnovale” (Ros-
sini), the Society.
8.10 p.m.: (2) Songs (a) “The Star” (Rogers),
(b) “I Love the Moon” (Reubens), Miss
Dorothy Cosgrove.
8.15 p.m.: (3) Choruses (1) “In Sherwood
Lived stout Robin Hood” (Lloyd); (2) “The
Daybreak of Day” (Reary), The Society.
8.26 p.m.: (4) violin, Final Motion of So-
nata A Main (Saint-Saens), • Mr. Dan
Scully.
8.36 p.m.: (5) Refrain, “The Three Ships”
(Thomas), The Society.
8.40 p.m.: (6) Songs (a) “A Brown Chicken
Singing” (Wooden), (b) “Uncle Rome” (Ho-
mer), Mr. Clement Williams.
8.48 p.m.: (7) Refrain, (a) “The place Artwork Thou
Beam of Gentle” (Bishop), (b) “Drink to Me
Solely” (Button).
8.55 p.m.: From the Studio, Climate re-
port and bulletins.
8.57 p.m.: Studio Dance Band, carried out by
Cec. Morrison.
9.7 p.m.: Sketches by Scott Alexander.
9. 19 p.m.: Len Maurice within the latest music
hits.
9.26 p.m.: Maggie Foster, violinist.
(a) “Mighty Lak a Rose” (Nevin).
(b) “Ave Maria” (Schubert).
(c) “Generally I’m Blissful.”
9.34 p.m.: Studio Dance Band, carried out by
Cec. Morrison.
9.44 p.m.: Sketches by Scott Alexander.
9.56 p.m.: Len Maurice within the latest music
hits.
10.Three p.m.: Maggie Foster, violinist.
(a) “Elfantanz.”
(b) “Salut d’Amour” (Elgar).
10.10 p.m.: Studio Dance Band, with popu-
lar choruses by Len Maurice.
10.30 p.m.: Late climate and bulletins
10.32 p.m.: Studio Dance Band, carried out
by Len Maurice.
10.57 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme.
10.59 p.m.: Studio Dance Band, carried out by
Len. Maurice.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; Shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes, information from
the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25
a.m.: Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O.
chimes; studio music. 8.35 a.m.: In-
formation mails, delivery, arrivals,
departures, and sailings. 8.38 a.m.:
Information from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.”
8.45 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; studio
music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
studio music. 9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with
silent pals. 10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes: shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
II a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; ladies’s
session, carried out by Mrs. Cranfield. 12
midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast and climate report. 12.3
p.m.: Studio music. 12.30 p.m.: Transport
and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market studies. 12.48
p.m.: “Solar” noon information service. 1 p.m :
Studio music. 1.30 p.m.: Discuss to kids
and particular leisure for kids in
hospital. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
shut down.
Notice.—Race outcomes.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
studio music. 3.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, carried out by Bennie Abrahams.
Four p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.0.; from
the studio, Laurie Oaks, baritone. 4.7 p.m.:
“Yarns by a Wanderer.” 4.20 p.m.: Roma-
no’s Dance Orchestra, carried out by Ben-
nie Abrahams. From the studio: 4.30 p.m.:
David MKissock, ’cellist. 4.37 p.m.: Laurie
Oaks, baritone. 4.44 p.m.: “Solar” information ser-
vice. 4.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orchestra,
carried out by Bennie Abrahams. s’p.m.:
The chemies of the G.P.O. Clock; from
the studio, “Our Serial Story.” 5.10 p.m.:
David MKissock, ’cellist. 5.17 p.m.: “Solar”
information service. 5.22 p.m.: Pianoforte repro-
duction. 5.15 p.m.: Producers’ Distributing
Society’s poultry report. 5.37 p.m.: Fea-
tures of the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session—music and en-
tertainment.
6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet—
(a) “Mazurka” (Glinka),
(b) “Souvenirs of the Ball” (Boccalari),
(c) “Romance” (Wieniawski),
(d) “Sally” (Kern),
(e) “Moonbeams” (Drigo),
(f) “Poupee Valvante” (PoldiniL
7.10 p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s report; climate report and
forecast by courtesy of Authorities Me-
teorologist; Producers’ Distributing Socie-
ty’s fruit and vegetable market report;
grain and fodder report (“Solar”); dairy
produce report (“Solar”).
7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam in ad-
vertising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
The Music Makers.
8.15 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
8-2$ p.m.: Mrs. C. R. Roberts, winner of the
Welsh Vocal Championship for Queens-
land, who competed with the winners of
different States in Melbourne, and is now on
her approach again to Brisbane.
8.29 p.m.: The Music Makers.
8.49 p.m.: “Bringa” will give a chat on the
Aborigines. >
p.m.: Climate report.
9.5 p.m.: From the Dee Why Theatre, the
second a part of the live performance programme ar-
ranged by the Dee Why and District
Choral Society.
Refrain, The Nice God, Pan” (Farebro-
ther).
Songs, (a) “The Start of Morn,”
(b) “I Hear a Thrush at Eve,” Miss
Dorothy Cosgrave.
Refrain, “After Many a Dusty Mile” (El-
gar) .
Violin, “Allegretto from Sonata” (Dries)
Mr. Dan Scully.
Refrain, “Sir Eglamore” (Balfour Gardi-
ner),
Music, “Mr. Clement Williams.
Refrain, “Music of the River” (Cowen),
“In Going to My Lonesome Mattress” (Ed-
wards).
9.55 p.m.: From the studio—
The Music Makers.
10.5 p.m.: Mrs. C. R. Roberts, soprano
10.12 p.m.: John Mitchell, Tenor.
10.19 p.m.: The Music Makers.
10.27 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.

Merry Widow” (Lehor). 4.Four p.m.: Gertrude Grey,
mezzo, “Lackaday” (Crampton), “Salaam” (Lengthy).
4.10 p.m.: Organ recital by Herbert Edwards,
L.A.8., from Archer Avenue Methodist Church, “In
a Monastery Backyard” (Ketelby), “Le Cygne”
(Saint-Saens), “Finale” (Hissi). Studio. 4.24
p.m.: Ralph Tempo, basso, “Ingesting, Ingesting,
Ingesting,” “Pal of Mine.” 4.30 p.m.: Twenty-
5 minutes with H.M.V. artists. Paul Whiteman’s
Orchestra, . “I’m Afraid of You” (Gottler), “My
Pet” (Ager); Nat Shilkret and his Orchestra,
“What’s the Purpose” (Rubens)., “Prepared for the
River” (Moret), “Fascinatiop Vamp” (Nussbaum),
“Stunning” (Gillespie); Paul Whiteman’s Orches-
tra, “Dancing Shadows,” “It Was the Daybreak of
Love.” 4.57 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Ex-
change info. 5.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes and
shut down. EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer:
J. L. Norris. Accompaniste: Jean Finlay.) 6.0
p.m.: G.P.O- chimes. 6.1 p.m.: Worldwide
cricket scores, England v. Geelong. 6.5 p.m.:
Kids’s completely happy moments, birthday greetings, cor-
respondence, songs and tales by “Miss Wi-fi.”
6.30 p.m.: Dinner music interlude on Sonora,
H,M.V. recordings. 7.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 7.1
p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade in-
formation. 7.5 p.m.: Basic market studies. 7.10
p.m. : Mr. D. T. Laurie (Authorities Poultry Ex-
pert), a chat on “Poultry Tick.” 7.30 p.m.: The
SCL Twinkler Boys’ Membership, leisure by the
“Twinkler.” NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. L.
Norris. Accompahiste: Jean Finlay.) 8.Zero p.m.:
G.P.O. chimes. 8.1 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band,
quick-step “The Flying Squad,” overture “Le Dia-
deme.” 8.15 p.m.: Diana Belmont, contralto, “The
Enchantress” . (Hullah), “Vale” (Russell). 8.19
p.m.: Seth Smith, banjoist, “Cheerio” (Stainer),
“En Avant” (Cammeyer). 8.25 p.m.: Jack Bur-
gess, “She’s Everyone’s Sweetheart however No person’s
Lady” (Conrad). “What Does It Matter?” (Berlin).
8.31 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band, choice, “Bee-
thoven’s Works.” 8.41 p.m.: Gertrude Grey,,
mezzo, “Chicken Lullaby” (Sanderson), “If My Songs
Have been Solely Winged” (Halin). 8,47 p.m.: A sketch
by Courtnejr’Ford, “The Sea Captain.” 8.53 p.m.:
Magill Vice-Regal Band, serenade, “The Warblers’
Serenade.” 9.Zero p.m.: G.P.0., Adelaide. 9.1 p.m.:
Diana Belmont, contralto, “Earlier than the Daybreak,”
“Rose Leaves.” 9.7 p.m.: Seth Smith, banjoist,
“Once I Sing the Rosary” (Gilbert), “To the
Entrance” (Cammeyer). 9.13 p.m.: Howard Bauer-
ochse, “Ah, Moon of My Delight” (Lehmann),
“Youth.” 9.19 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal
Band, waltz “Ramona,” march “The Iron Divi-
sion.” 9.29 p.m.: Jack Burgess, “You Don’t Like
It. Not A lot” (De Rose), ,“Are’ You Blissful?”
(Yellen). 9.35 p.m.: Magill Vice-Regal Band,
Morceau, “Dreamland Bells.” 9.41 p.m.: A sketch
by Courtney Ford, “The Burning. Studio.” 9.50
p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “My Activity” (Ashford),
“Fleurette’ ’■(M’Geoch). 9.56 p.m.: Magill Vice-
Regal Bnd, “You’re a Actual Sweetheart,” “Absorb
the Solar Grasp Out the Moon.” 10.5 p.m.: Howard
Bauerochse, “Eleanofe” (Taylor), “On St Nicho-
las’s Day” (Martin). 10.11 p.m.: Magill Vice-
Regal Band, “You’re a Actual Sweetheart,” “Absorb
10.15 p.m.: “Advertiser” basic information service-
British Official wi-fi information; meteorological in-
formation; station bulletins. 10.29 p.m •
Our good-night thought; 10.30 p.m.: The dance
is the factor; by courtesy of 3LO, Melbourne dance
mqsic by the well-known Radi-o-Aces. 11.10 P.m.:
God Save the King.
2GB
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 p.m.: Happiness speak
by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music 10.30
a.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss Helen J.
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.Zero p.m.:
Music. 2.5 p.m.: Ladies’s radio service, by
Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m.: Music.
3.Zero p.m.: Discuss. 3.15 p.m.: Shut down 5.30
p.m.: Kids’s session, by Uncle George.
7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market studies, by New
Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Company, Ltd.
7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: 2GB Instrumen-
tal Trio, Miss Ada Brook, Mr. Cecil Berry,
Mr. Cedric Ashton. 8.15 p.m.: Smgs by
Miss Alsia Haywood. 8.25 p.m.: A humor-
ous interlude by Mr. Jack Win and Mr.
Heath Burdock. 8.30 p.m.: Violin solos by
Mr. Cecil Berry. 8.40 p.m.: Songs by Mr.
C. E .Cooke. 8.50 p.m.: Pianoforte solos
by Miss Ada Brook. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate re-
port. 9.Three p.m.: Handle. 9.15 p.m.: Songs
by Miss Alcia Haywood. 9.25 p.m.: ’Cello
solos by Mr. Cedric Ashton. 9.35 p.m : A
numorous interlude. 9.40 p.m.: Songs by
Mr. C. E. Cooke. 9.50 p.m.: 2GB Instru-
psychological Trio. 10.10 p.m.: Orchestral music.
10.30 p.m.: Shut down.

P.37 – Farmer’s Advert[edit]

At Farmer’s —the latest in Radiol

f
S
n
rM
Examine at Farmer’s—
“RAY-O-VAC”
offers longer life—higher reception
Such a battery is specifically constructed to provide longer
life—higher reception —higher radio leisure, in loud-
speaker units of two or extra valves. The key of its
superiority is that this—a brand new design fully eliminating inside
brief circuits. All lively parts produce present with all
their vitality. There isn’t any waste. Therefore the battery lasts
longer.
Greater than this, whereas it does final—even then —all different
comparable items are eclipsed as a result of the “ Ray-O-Vac ” has
such a low inside resistance ; preserving this, even when
almost worn out; the result’s that distortion by no means ensues.
In order that, not solely do you enhance reception, however you additionally
“ reduce the price ”of working. Give the “ Ray-O-Vac ” a
trial, then. Examine it at Farmer’s. For 45 volts energy, the
costs are : Giant capability, 23/6. Heavy responsibility, 28/6.
Wi-fi Division, First Flooring
FARMER’S
PITT, MARKET & GEORGE STS., SYDNEY

P.38 – Interstate Programmes, Tuesday, January 5[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Tuesday, January 5
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.IS a.m.: Morning
melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workout routines to music.
7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies; market studies; basic
information; delivery; sporting info; categorical prepare
..info. Eight a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time
sign. 8.1 a.m.: Morning melodies. 8.15 a.m.:
Shut down. MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer:
C. J. O’Connor.) 11 a.m.: 3LO’S completely different dainties
for the Day by day Dinner. To-day’s Radio Recipe:
Yorkshire Pudding. 11.5 a.m.: J. Howlett Ross will
communicate on “The Mom in Literature.” 11.20 a.m.:
Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m.: Mrs. Dorothy Silk
will communicate on “Homecrafts.” 11.40 a.m.: Musical
interlude. 11.45 a.m.: Mid-day Information Session. 12
midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign. Specific
prepare info. 12.1 p.m.: Steel costs re-
ceived by the Australian Mines and Metals Asso-
ciation from the London Inventory Trade this present day.
British official wi-fi information from Rugby; Reuter’s
and the Australian Press Affiliation cables; “Ar-
gus” information service. 12.15 p.m.: Newmarket inventory
gross sales; particular report by John M’Namara and Co.
MID-DAY MUSICAL SESSION.—I2.2O p.m.: The
Station Orchestra, choice, “Giaconda” (Ponchi-
elli). 12.30 p.m.: Herbert Browne, tenor (by per-
mission J. C. Williamson, Ltd). 12.37 p.m.: Inventory
Trade info. 12.40 p.m.: The Station
Orchestra, choice, “Manon” (Massenet). 12.50
p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano, “Open Thy Blue
Eyes” (Massenet), chosen. 12.57 p.m.: Guildford
Bishop, violin, “Chanson Du Printemps” (Have),
chosen. 1.Four p.m.: The Station Orchestra, ballet
music to “Rosamunde” (Schubert). 1.11 p.m.: Me-
teorological info; climate forecast for Vic-
toria, Tasmania, South Australia, and New South
Wales; ocean forecast; river report; rainfall. 1.18
p.m.: Herbert Browne, tenor. 1.25 p.m.: The Sta-
tion Orchestra, fantasie, “Wunderklange” (Bizet).
1.37 p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano, “Know’st Thou
the Land,” from “Mignon” (Thomas). 1.45 p.m.:
Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSlON—(Announcer:
C. J. O’Connor. Accompaniste: Agnes Fortune.)
2.15 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Virginia Creeper”
(Wade), “Little Log Cabin of Goals” (Harley),
“Final Night time I Dreamt. You Kissed Me” (Kahn).
2.24 p.m.: Syd. Hollister, comic, “Jest and Jol-
lity.” 2.31 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Who Is aware of”
(Dixon), “Ah, Candy Thriller of Life” (Herbert),
“Night Star” (Turk). 2.40 p.m.: John Byrne,
bass (by permission J. C. Williamson, Ltd.) 2.47
p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Down Residence Rag”
(Sweetman), “Henry’s Made a Woman Out of Lizzie”
(O’Keefe), “Luck in Love” (Henderson). 2.56 p.m.:
Jean Lewis, contralto, “Little Previous Backyard”
(Hewitt), “Star of the East” (Lohr).. 3.Three p.m.:
The Radi-o-Aces, “The Finest Issues in Life are
Free” (Henderson), “In a Bamboo Backyard” (Don-
aldson), “Something You Say” (Donaldson). 3.12
p.m.: Keith Desmond, elocutionist, will give a
brief recital. 3.19 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “That
Melody of Love” (Donaldson), “Constantinople”
(Carlton), “Don’t Cry, Child” (Kahn). 3.28 p.m.:
Sonora Recital. 3.58 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces,
“Hum and Strum” (Mayers), “Woman of Love”
(Nausbaum), “Jazz Grasp”, piano solo (Mayeral).
4.7 p.m.: Syd. Hollister, comic, “Vaudevil-
lainies.” 4.14 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “In My
Bouquet of Reminiscences” (Lewis), “Sentimental
Child” (Palmer), “Rose of Monteray” (Man). 4.23
p.m.: John Byrne, bass. 4.30 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces, “Crimson Head” (Embury), “Jeannine” (Gilbert),
“Dream Home” (Fox). 4.39 p.m.: Jean Lewis,
contralto, “When the Stars Have been Younger” (Rubens),
“Poppies for Forgetting” (Coningsby-Clarke). 4.46
p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “I’m Sdrry, Sally” (Kahn),
“When You Know Me” (Baden), “Inform Me To-
Night time” (Little). 4.53 p.m.: Keith Desmond, elo-
cutionist, will give a brief recital. 5 p.m.: “Herald”
information service; Inventory Trade info. 5.10
p m.: Shut down. EVENING SESSlON.—r(An-
nouncer: Frank Hatherley.) 6 p.m.: Solutions to
letters and birthday greetings by “Bobby Blue-
gum.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m.:
“Little Miss Kookaburra” will inform you about “Tibby
Kittycat’s Holidays,” after which some extra about
“Jack and Jill and the Jolly Jay’s Secret.” 6.50
p.m.: “Bobby Bluegum,” songs and tales. NIGHT
SESSION. — (Announcer: John Stuart. Accompan-
iste: Agnes Fortune.) 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Trade
info. 7.15 p.m.: Market studies by John
M’Namara and Co.; official report of the New-
market inventory gross sales by the Related Inventory and
Station Brokers, Bourke Avenue, Melbourne. Fish
market studies by J. R. Borritt,, Ltd. Rabbit
costs. River studies. Market studies by the
Victorian Producers’ Co-operative Co., Ltd. Poul-
strive, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy produce, pota-
toes, and onions; market studies of fruit by the
Related Fruitgrowers’ Affiliation; retali costs;
wholesale costs of fruit by the Wholesale Fruit
Retailers’ Affiliation;, citrus fruits. 7.30 p.m.:
Information session. 7.43 p.m.: Birthday greetings. 7.45
p.m.: Out of the Previous. 7.46 p.m.: Below the
auspices of the College Extension Board, Mr.
J. T. Saxton, M.A.. will communicate on “Playgrounds.”
Eight p.m.: A Maker of Historical past. 8.1 p.m.: The 59th
Battalion Band, overture, “Golden Cross.” 8.12 p.m.
Jean Lewis, contralto, “Drained Palms” (Sanderson),
“Reminiscence Music” (Oliver). 8.19 p.m.: The 59th Bat-
talion Band, march “Caractacus.” 8.24 p.m.:
Bernard Manning, bass (by permission j. C. Wil-
liamson, Ltd.) 8.31 p.m.: A violin, piano, and vo-
cal recital by Wm. G. James, Donald M’Beath, and
Mms. Saffo Arnov. A travelogue. 9 p.m.: Profes-
sor R. J. A. Berry, “St. Louis Mo and Generally
Mi.” 915 p.m.: The 59th Battalion Band, march,
“Ivanhoe,” fox trot, chosen. 9.25 p.m.: Violet
Jackson, soprano, “A Brown Chicken Singing” (Wooden)
“Blissful Music” (Riego). 9.32 p.m.: The 59th Bat-
talion Band, waltz, “Golden Sunbeams.” 9.42
p.m.: Syd. Hollister, comic, “A Laughter Lec-
turette.” 9.52 p.m.: Jean Lewis, contralto, “The
Night time Has a Thousand Eyes” (Lambert), “Solely the
River Operating By” (John Hopkins). 10.2 p.m.:
The 59th Battalion Band, stately dance, “Good
Queen Bess.” 10.9 p.m.: Bernard Manning, bass.
10.16 p.m.: “Argus” information service; meteorological
info; British official wi-fi information; an-
nouncements; sporting notes by “Olympus”; Eric
Welch’s alternatives for the Woodend races to-mor-
row. 10.26 p.m.: The 59th Battalion Band, sel-
ected. 10.31 p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano, “Snow-
flakes,” “Philosophy.” 10.38 p.m.: The 59th Bat-
talion Band, chosen. 10.43 p.m.: Bulletins.
10.45 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “The Dance of the
Blue Danube” (Fisher), “It’s Gonna Be Lengthy”
(Whiting). 11.1 p.m.: Our Nice Thought for To-
day is: “Individuals seldom enhance once they have
no different mannequin however themselves to repeat from”
(Goldsmith). 11.2 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “It
Goes Like This” (Caesar), ““Roses of Yesterday”
(Berlin), “Eternally Extra” (Runnett), “Nebraska”
(Aitken), “That’s My Weak spot Now” (Stept),
“Get Out and Get Below the Moon” (Tobias), “In
a Bamboo Backyard” (Donaldson), “Something You
Say” (Donaldson), “Good Night time Waltz” (Bibo).
Good Night time Music. 11.40 p.m.: God Save the King.
3AR
MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: C. H. Hosking.)
10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock says “Ten,” 10.1 a.m.:
“Age” Inventory Trade studies; London steel mar-
ket. 10.10 a.m.: “Age” market studies; farm and
station produce; fruit, fish, greens, and so forth. 10.25
a.m.: “Age” delivery studies; ocean forecast. 10.30
a.m.: Mail notices; categorical prepare info.
10.35 a.m.: “Age” information service, unique to 3AR.
10.59 p.m.: Climate forecast. 11.Zero a.m.: Ned Tyr-
rell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Lonely in a Crowd” (Greer),
“Chloe” (Kahn), “Parting with You” (Conley),
“Kiss Earlier than th£ Daybreak” (Perkins). 11.10 a.m.:
Vocal vivacity. 11.15 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces, “Angelia Mia” (Rappee), “Nebraska” (Sis-
silli), “Eternally Extra” (Burnett), “What Do I Care
What Anyone Stated” (Woods). 11.25 a.m.: Vocal
vivacity. 11.30 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces,
“What a Child” (Whiting), “Anyone’s Loopy
About You” (Murphy), “Get Out and Get Below
the Moon” (Tobias), “That’s My Weak spot Now”
/ (Stept). 11.40 a.m.: Vocal vivacity., 11.45 a.m.:
Interlude. Captain Donald M’Lean, “And All I
Ask is a Merry Yarn from a Laughing Fellow
Rover” fJohn Masefield). 12.Zero midday: Ned Tyr-
rell’s Radi-o-Aces, “What a Child” (Whiting),
“Beloved Me” (Wilson), “Why Haven’t We Obtained the
Sunday Each Day” (Summers), “Sticky Paws”
(Andrina). 12.10 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 12.13
p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Chuckle, Clown,
Chuckle” (Younger), “By no means Earlier than, By no means Once more”
(Chik), “You’re in Love, I’m in Love” (Donald-
son), “Adoree” (Silver), “Please Inform Me” (Miller).
12.23 p.m.: Wi-fi information; bulletins. 12.33
p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “A Stolen Melody”
(Fisher), “Sunshine” (Berlin), “Obtained a Massive Date
with a Little Lady” (Tobias), “Jeannine” (Gilberts).
12.43 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 12.48 p.m.: Ned Tyr-
inform’s Radi-o-Aces, “Dream Home” (Fox), “Chi-
quita” (Wayne), “I’m Gonna Settle Up” (Frich).
12.58 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 1.Three p.m.: Ned Tyr-
rell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Take You To-morrow” (Razay),
“Fortunate in Love” (Henderson), “The Finest Issues
in Life are Free” (Henderson), “Sleepy Child”
(Tierney). 1.13 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. l!l8 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “The Kin-Kijou” (Tier-
ney), “Rio Rita” (Tierney), “I’m Sorry, Sally”
(Kahn), “A Little Change of Ambiance” (Brown),
“I Wanna Go Voon Voon Vo” (Brown). 1.30 p.m.-
Shut down. EVENING .SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Frank Hatherle.y.) 6.Zero p.m.: Candy solace from
the Seraphina. NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Frank Hatherley.) 8.Zero p.m.: Below the auspices of
the Royal Car Membership of Victoria, Alured
Kelly will communicate on “The Month in Motordom.”
‘ 8.15 p.m.: A. G. Kelson, president of the 3AR
Stamp Membership, “Stamps.” 8.30: The Station Orches-
tra, overture “Rosamunde” (Schubert). 840 p m •
Keith Desmond, “Cute Catches.” 8.47 p.m.: Memol
ries of the Strauss Household; the Station Orchestra
choice. “La Chauve Souris” (J. Strauss) 857
p.m.: Effie Armstrong, contralto. “Dream within the
Twilight” (Strauss), “Relaxation Thee, My Spirit”
(Strauss). 9.Four p.m.: The Station Orchestra, selec-
tion, “A Waltz Dream” (Oscar Strauss). 9.9 p.m •
Effie Armstrong, contralto, “To None Will I Mv
Love E’er Uncover” (Strauss), “At Night time”
(Strauss). 9.16 p.m.: NeWs interval. 9.18 pm-
The Station Orchestra, Andante from “Sanata;’op.
7 (Grieg). 9.24 p.m.: Keith Desmond, “Desultory
Digressions.” 9.30 p.m.: Transmission from the
Victory Theatre. Melbourne, the Victory Theatre
Orchestra, below the baton of Henri Penn. 10.30
p.m.: From the studio. “Age” information. service’, exclu-
sive to three AR; bulletins; acceptances for Wed-
npsd&y s r&CGs 13.29 p.m * Our
Shakespearean good-night citation is from “Mac-
beth. To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-mor-
row. Creeps m this petty tempo from day after day.
To the final syllable of recorded time- And ah
our yesterdays have lighted fools The best way to
dusty dying Out, out, transient candle! Life’s however a
strolling shadow; a poor participant. That struts and
nn t i,nrl. h – C i Ur – upol l * he stage. After which is heard
no extra, it’s a story, instructed by an fool, filled with
and , fur y- Signifying nothing.” 10.30 pm-
God Save the King. ‘
4QG
• 1 -I < !? XIVG SESSION.-?.43 a.m,: Time sig- nJals.- . 7.45 a.m.: Information service. 8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical data. 8.15 a.m.: Information service. 830 a.m.: Shut down. MORNING SESSlON.—(An- nouncer: Rita M’Auliffe.) 11.Zero a.m.: Music 11 5 ami.: Social information. 11.15 a.m.: Lecturette: Discuss on Residence Crafts,” by Mrs. R. L. Reid. 11.45 a.m.: Wurlitzer organ. 12.Zero Midday: Shut down. MID- DAY SESSION.— (Announcer: ft. Wight.) 1 opm * Market studies and climate info. 1.20 p.m.: Lunch-hour music. 2.Zero p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSlON.—(Announcer: H. Humph- reys.) 3.Zero p.m.: A programme of electrically re- produced data. 3.30 p.m.; Mail, prepare operating instances. 4.15 p.m.: This afternoon’s information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down. EARLY EVENING SESSION.— (Announcers: R. Wight and H. Humphreys.) 6.0 p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; mail info; delivery information. 6.5 p.m.: Dinner music. 6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, carried out by “Uncle Ben.” 7.0 p.m.: Information in short. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Trade information. 7.6 p.m.: Steel quotations. 7.7 p.m.: Mar- ket studies. 7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate info. 7.40 p.m.: An- nouncements. 7.43 p.m.: Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lecturette: “A Discuss on Dairying,” by Mr. C. F.M’Grath (Chief Supervisor of Dairying). NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcers: H. Humphreys and A. V. James.) 8.Zero p.m.: A live performance organized by Messrs. Olsen and Goodchap. 9.Zero p.m.: Metro- politan climate forecast. Half ll.—Radio Thriller Play—“ The Sarcophagus,” by W. S. Mew. The sec- ond portion of the programme will comprise the sequel to the radio thriller play, “The Sarco- phagus,” which was offered by 4QG on Thurs- day, January 3. It will likely be remembered that the play, which was based mostly on the fulfilment of a curse of Previous Egypt, broke off at a. most myster- ious level. Listeners had been requested to aim to resolve it, and ahead their makes an attempt to 4QG, a prize of £2/2/ being provided for the most effective answer. The play can be summarised to-night, taken up once more at an fascinating level, and concluded. The identify of the prizewinner will then be introduced. 9.Zero p.m.: From the Studio —Sequel to the mys- tery play, “The Sarcophagus.” Solid: Amen-Ra (a king), W. S. Mew; Mena-Ra (his son), ; Sir Arthur Colville (Egyptologist), Ernest Barry;' Dr. Harrington Farrow (his good friend), W. S. Mew; Hazel Colville, Mavis Macfarlane; Jack Stirling (Hazel’s fiance), C. D. Moran; Esaye (Colville’s Egyptian servant), H. Collins; Fasola (Colville’s Egyptian servant), ; Za-Rita (Hazel’s Egyptian maid), Constance Archdall. 10.Zero p.m.: The “Day by day Mail” information; the “Courier” mews; climate information; "Queenslander” bi-weekly information service for distant listeners. Shut down. 5CL
MORNING SESSlON.*—(Announcer: J. L. Norris. Ac-
companiste: Jean Finlay.) 11 a.m.: G.P.O.
chimes. 11.1 a.m.: Vocal and instrumental con-
cert on the Sonora, Columbia recordings. Robert
Easton, bass, “The Midnight Assessment” (Glinka),
“Music of Hybrias the Cretan” (Elliott). Johann
Strauss and Symphony Orchestra, “The Gipsy
Baron” (Strauss), in two elements. Louis Graveure,
baritone, “The place My Caravan has Rested.” 11.15
a.m.: Residence Dishes, “Economist,” Kitchen Craft
and Manu speak. 11.30 a.m.: Paul Whitemann
and his Band, “Night Star” (Turk), “Get Out
iand Get Below the Moon,” “Constantinople.” 11.45
4a.m.: Maggie Tulliver, “The Man I Love.” Discuss on
“The Notary of Hageneau,” “My Melancholy
Child.” 12.15 p.m.: “The Advertiser” basic
■information service. 12.35 p.m.: British official wi-fi
information. 12.40 p.m.: Grand Opera. Lina Scavizzi,
soprano, “Voi lo Sapete O Mamm,” from “Cavalle-
ria Rusticana” (Mascagni), “Vissi darte,” from
“La Tosca” (Puccini). 12.50 p.m.: S.A. railway
info. 12.51 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s
Inventory Trade info. 12.57 p.m.: Meteoro-
logical info. 1 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 1.1
p.m.: Geoff Qoldsworthy, ’cellist, “Air” (Mathe-
son), “Londonderry Air.” 1.6 p.m.: Meta Riedel,
mezzo, “I Heard You Singing” (Coates), “A Le-
gend” (Tschaikowsky). 1.12: Paul Jeacle, saxo-
phonist, “Valse Saxioso” (Jeacle), “It’s Too Late to
be Sorry Now.” 1.18 p.m.: A Symphonic Inter-
lude by The British Broadcasting Symphony Or-
chestra, “Les Tens of millions D’Arlequin” (Drigo), “The
Bohemian Lady” (Balfe), “Live performance Waltz in A,”
“The Jewels of the Madonna” (Ferrari), “The
Empire” (Elgar). 1.38 p.m.: Geoff Goldsworthy,
’Cellist, “Previous Italian Love Songs,” “Le Cygne”
(Sains-Saens). 1.44: Meta Riedel, mezzo, “The
Moorish Maid” (Parks), “I Love a Little Cot-
tage.” 1.50: Paul Jeacle, saxophonist, “Gloria”
(Weidoeft), fashionable melodies. -1.56 p.m.: Sta-
tion bulletins. : 1.58 ‘ p.m.: Meteorological
info. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.—Three p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
3.1 p.m.: Boake Smith’s Palais Royal Band, “Get
Out and Get Below the Moon,” “Simply Like a
Melody Out of the Sky,” ‘‘Down South.” 3.12 p.m.: ,
Diana Belmont, contralto, “Earlier than the Daybreak,”
“The Enchantress.” 3.18 p.m.: Lulu Hackendorf,
violiniste, “Fantasia Appassionata” (Vieuxtemps).
3.24 p.m.: Courtney Ford, humorist in a Humorous
Interlude. 3.32 p.m.: Boake Smith’s Band, “Lady
of My Goals,” “Alabama Stomp,” “Mary Ann.”
3.42 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo. “The Blind
Ploughman,” “I Love the Moon.” 3.48. p.m.:
Jean Finlay, pianiste, chosen pianoforte solos.
Four p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 4.1 p.m.: Boake Smith’s
Band, “Chloe,” “I am Wingin’ Residence,” “Final Night time I
Dreamed,” “Cheritza.” 4.12 p.m.: Courtney
Ford, humorist, in a Humorous Interlude. 418
p.m.: Lulu Hackendorf, violiniste, “Gipsy Airs”
(Sarasate). 4.24 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo
“Swing Low Candy Chariot,” “’Tis Me, O Lord
4.39 p.m.: Boake Smith’s Band, “That’s My Weak-
ness Now,” “Aspect by Aspect.” 4.40 p.m.: Rev. G
E. Hale, 8.A., speak on “Don’t You Fear ” 4 55
p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade infor-
mation. 5 p.m.: G.P.O chimes; shut down EVEN-
ING SESSION.— (Announcer: Athol Lykke.V 6 pm •
G.P.O. chimes. 6.1 p.m.: Kids’s Blissful’Mol
(Continued on web page 40.)

P.39 – Native Programmes, Wednesday, January 9[edit]

Native Programmes, Wednesday, January 9
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane).
7 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 7.5
a.m.: Studio music. 7.20 a.m.: Nation
session; official climate forecast, rainfall,
temperatures, astronomical memoranda,
delivery intelligence, mail companies, river
studies. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market,
mining sharemarket, steel quotations. 7.35
a.m.: Wool gross sales, breadstuffs markets, in-
ter-State markets, produce markets. 7.45
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” abstract.
7.50 a.m.: Studio music. Eight a.m.: “Massive
Ben”; shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 10.2
a.m.: Pianoforte copy. 10.10 a.m.:
“Sydney Morning Herald” information service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.45 a.m.: A
speak on Residence Cooking and Recipes, by
Miss Ruth Furst. 11 a.m.: “Massive Ben”;
A.P.A. and Reuter’s cable companies. 11.5:
Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
Notice —Race outcomes.
12 midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 12.2
p.m.: Inventory Trade, first name. 12.3:
Official climate forecast, rainfall. 12.5:
p.m.: Musical merchandise. 12.1) p.m.: Abstract
of reports, “Sydney Morning Herald.” 12.15
p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18 p.m.: A
studying. 12.30 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Bendigo.
12.47 p.m.: Studio music. 1 p.m.: “Massive
Ben”; climate intelligence. 1.Three p.m.:
“Night Information” noon internet”! service; Professional-
ducers’ Distributing Society’s report. 1.20
p.m.: Studio music. 1.28 p.m.: Inventory Ex-
change, second name. 1.30 p.m.: Studio
music. 1.57 p.m.: Cricket scores. 2 p.m.:
“Massive Ben”; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
230 p.m.: Programme bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Recital of chosen data of world
well-known artists. Three p.m.: “Massive Ben”; piano-
forte copy. 3.15 p.m.: Common
music. 3.30 p.m.: Nea Hallet, in fashionable
numbers. 3.37 p.m.: Cliff Arnold, novelty
pianist. 3.45 p.m.: Cricket scores, Eng-
land v. Bendigo, performed at Bendigo; a read-
ing. Four p.m.: “Massive Ben”; Nea Hallett in
fashionable numbers. 4.7 p.m.: Cliff Arnold,
novelty pianist. 4.14 p.m.: From the Went-
price, the Wentworth Cafe Dance Or-
chestra, carried out by Jimmy Elkins. 4.24
p m • From the Studio, fashionable music. 4.45
p.m.: Third name of the Inventory Trade
447 p.m.: Studio music. 5 p.m.: “Massive
Ben”; shut down-.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
5.40 p.m.: The Chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.: The Kids’s Session, carried out
by “Whats up Man,” assisted by Uncle Ted and
Sandy; letters and tales; music and en-
tertainment.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market studies (wool,
wheat, and inventory).
6 40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6 43 pm.: Inventory Trade info.
6A5 P-m.: Climate and delivery information.
6 48 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
7 pm- “Massive Ben”; late information service.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartet, con-
ducted by Horace Keats.
(a) “Polonaise” (Chopin).
(b) “Russian Cradle Music” (Krein).
(c) “Les Deux Pigeons” (Messager).
(d) “Orientale” (Cui).
(e) “Romance” (Rubinstein).
(f) Fox trot.
EVENING SESSION
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte copy.
7.53 p.m.: Common music.
Eight p.m.: “Massive Ben”. Basic evening. That is
the primary of the collection of Basic Professional-
grammes which the N.S.W. Broadcasting
Firm are providing to listeners every
Wednesday evening by 2FC service for
the primary three months of the brand new yr.
Listeners to whom Class: o Music doesn’t
enchantment are reminded {that a} Programme on
fashionable strains has been organized to-night
by 2BL service. Programme organized
by Oliver King. Gerald ’”’alenn and Bryce
Carter, “First Motion from Trio in D
Minor” (Arensky).
8.7 p.m.: Miss Gwen Selva, soprano.
(a) “Vergebliches Standchen” (Brahms).
(b) “Andie Nachtigall” (Brahms).
(c) “Les Papillons” (Chansson).
(d) “Les Berceaux’ (Faure).
(e) “Nell” (Faure).
8.17 p.m.: Miss Dagmar Roberts, pianiste,
“Scherzo B flat Minor” (Chopin).
8.29 p.m.: Gerald Walenn, violin.
(a) “Minuet” (Veracini).
(b) “Tambourin’’ (Neclair-Kreisler).
8.35 p.m.: Oliver King, songs.
(a) “My Abode” (Schubert).
(b) “Dream within the Twilight” (Strauss).
8.45 p.m,: Bryce Carter, ’cello.
(a) “Andante from Concerto” (Lindner).
8.52 p.m.: Miss Gwen Selva and Oliver King,
duets—
(a) “La ci Darem” (Mozart) (from “Don
Giovanni).
(b) “Trot Right here and There” (from Vero-
nique), (Messager).
9 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; and climate report and
forecast
9.1 p.m.: The second of 1 e collection of talks
organized by Mr. C. R. Corridor, “Out and
About Iraq and Persia,” “The Toilers.”
9.15 p.m.: Second a part of the Basic Professional-
gramme organized by Mr. Oliver King. Ger-
ald Walenn and Bryce Carter, violin and
’cello and Ewart Chappie, pianiste, “Sluggish
Motion and Finale from Trio in D
Minor” (Arensky).
9.24 p.m.: Miss Gwen Selva, soprano, “Group
of Previous English Songs.’
9.34 p.m.: Miss Daemar Roberts, pianiste.
(a) “Bohemian Dance” (Smetana).
(b) “Gavotte” (Gluck-Brahms).
(c) “Caprice,” by request (Paganini-Schu-
mann).
9.46 p.m.: Gerald Walenn, violinist
(a) “Chinese language Dance” (Kreisler).
9.53 p.m.: Oliver King, songs—
(a) “Now Phoebus Sinketh within the West”
(from Milton’s Comus) (ArnelMoffat).
(b) “The Ship of Rio” (Frederick Kiel).
10.1 p.m.: Bryce Carter, ’cello.
(a) “Traumerei” (Schumann):
(b) “Tarantelle” (Popper).
10.Eight p.m.: Neighborhood singing by Studio
viewers, led by Oliver King.
10.15 p.m.: “Around the World by Wi-fi,”
relays from varied stations.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; studio music. 8.35
a.m.: Data, mails, delivery, ar-
rivals, departures, and sailings. 8.38 a.m.:
Information from the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.”
8.45 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; studio
music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
studio music. 9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with
silent pals. 10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BI*
Ladies’s Sports activities Affiliation session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 am.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Ladies’s
session, carried out by Mrs. Cranfield. 12
midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast and climate report. 12.3
p.m.: Pianoforte copy. 12.30 p.m.:
Transport and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market
studies. 12.45 p.m.: Cricket scores, Eng-
land v. Bendigo, performed at Bendigo. 12.48
p.m.: “Solar” noon information service. 1 p.m.:
Studio music. 1.30 p.m.: Discuss to kids
and particular leisure for kids in
hospital. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Shut down.
Notice: Race outcomes.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m. – The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
cricket scores, England v. Bendigo, performed
at Bendigo. 3.47 p.m.: Studio music. 3.50
p.m.: Romanos Dance Orchestra, conduct-
ed by Bennie Abrahams. Four p.m.: The
chimes of the G.P.O. clock; from the
studio, Regma Bannon, soprano. 4.7 p.m.:
Ivy Pawsey, contralto. 4.14 p.m.: “Solar”
information service. 4.20 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, carried out by Bennie Abrahams.
4.30 p.m.: Regina Bannon, soprano. 4.37
p.m.: Ivy Pawsey, contralto. 4.44 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Bendigo, performed
at Bendigo. 4.45 p.m.: “Solar” information ser-
vice. 4.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orches-
tra, carried out by Bennie Abrahams. 5
p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
from the studio, “Our Serial Story.” 5.10
p.m.: Pianoforte copy. 5.20 p.m.:
Racing resume. 5.37 p.m.: Options of
the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcers: J. Knight Barnett and Basil
Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session, music and en-
tertainment.
6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: ‘2BL Dinner Quartet—
(a) “Mauresque Caprice’ (Boecalari),
/ (b) “Promotionen” (Strauss),
(c) “It Occurred in Nordland’ (Herbert),
(d) “Hindoo Music” (Bemberg),
(e) “Anitra’s Dance” (Grieg),
(f) “Finale” (Haydn).
7.10 p.m.: Cricket scores.
7.12 p.m.: Aust. Mercantile Land and Fin-
ance Co.’s report; climate report and fore-
solid, by courtesy of Authorities Meteoro-
logist; Producers’ Distributing Society’s
fruit and vegetable market report; grain
and fodder report (“Solar”); dairy produce
report (“Solar”).
7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pim and Miss Pam In adver-
tising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Jack Barnett and Dorothy Dewar, enter-
tainers.
8.10 p.m.: From the Rose Bay Wintergarden
Theatre—The Rose Bay Theatre Orches-
tra, below the conductorship of Lionel
Hart.
8.30 p.m.: From the Studio—
Sydney Calland, baritone.
8.37 p.m.: A sketch by the gamers of the
Gamers’ Membership. •

deserves; birthday greetings; correspondence songs
and tales by “The Wattle Woman.” 630 d m •’
Dinner Music Interlude on The Sonora, Columbia
Recordings. 7 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 7.1 pm.
c °’ s Inventory Trade info.
7.5 p.m.. Basic market studies. 7 Eight nm •
Sporting service by “Silvius.” 7.20 pm • Miss
Laurie McLeod, speak on the Artwork of Dancing. 7.40
p.m.. Dr, Heibero Basedow, an Australian speak
NIGHT SESSION.-Eight p.m.: G.P.O. chimes Ex-
cerpts from “Faust” (Gounod), by Foxhall Rob-
inson s Operatic Firm, assisted by the Station
Orchestra; transient synopsis of the opera. Eight Three pm-
Station Orchestra, choice, “Faust” (Gounod)’
the Firm, “The Kermesse Scene”; Mrs Lucv
HUI, soio, “The Flower Music”; station Orchestra,
incidental music; L. Schapel, “Cavatina”; Lynnie
Gilbert, solo, *‘The Jewel Music”; the Firm
waltz refrain, “Gentle as Air”; Jessie Le Cornu!
solo, “Romanza”; the Firm, refrain “The
Troopers’ Refrain”; W. R. Griffiths, bass,’ “Sere-
nata.” 9 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 9.1 p.m.: Me-
teorological info. 9.Three p.m.: Abroad
grain report. Gentle orchestral and vocal live performance
8.Four p.m.: Station Orchestra, choice, “Rose
Marie” (Frirhl). 9.12 p.m.: Diana Belmont, con-
tralto, “Down within the Quiet Hills,” “That’s All.”
9.18 p.m.: Station Orchetra, suite, “Vive la Dance”
(Finck). 9.24 p.m.: Will Runge, humorist, in
droll humor. 9.30 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo,
“Steal Away,” “Have been You There.” 9.36 p.m.: Tom
King, pianist, authentic compositions. 9.41 p.m.:
Diana Belmont, contralto, “Sognia,” “Nonetheless because the
Night time” (Bohm). 9.45 p.m.: Station Orchestra.
“Two Tzigane Dances” (Bond). 9.54 p.m.: Will
Runge, humorist, in droll humor. 10.Four p.m.:
Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “Pale Moon” (Logan)-, “I
Love You Actually.” 10.10 p.m.: Station Orchestra,
novelette, “In a Tea Backyard” (Lodge). 10.15
p.m.: “The Advertiser” basic information service.; Brit-
ish official wi-fi information; 5CL’s sporting service,
by “Silvius”; meteorological info. 10.29
p.m.: Our Good Night time Thought. 10.30 p.m.: Take
a Step, Take a Step. by courtesy of 3LO, Mel-
bourne, Trendy Danee • by the Well-known
Radi-o-Aces. 11.10 p.m.: God Save the King.
8.49 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
9 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; climate
report.
9.1 p.m.: A sports activities speak by Claude Corbett.
9.16 p.m.: Sydney Calland, baritone.
9.23 p.m.: A sketch by the gamers of the
Gamers’ Membership.
9.35 p.m.: Jack Barnett and Dorothy Dewar.
9.45 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
9.55 p.m.: Artwork Leonard, within the latest music
hits.
10.2 p.m.: Promenade the Rose Bay Wintergarden
Theatre, the Rose Bay Theatre Orchestra,
below the conductorship of Lionel Hart.
10.22 p.m.: Promenade the studio—
Late climate and bulletins.
10.25 p.m.: Artwork Leonard, within the latest music
hits.
10.30 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
10.57 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.59 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
Throughout the intervals between dance gadgets
“Solar” information can be broadcast.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem.
Shut down.
2GB
Wednesday, January 9.
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 p.m.: Happiness speak
by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music. 10.30
a.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss Helen J,
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2 Zero p.m.:
Music. 2.5 p.m.: Ladies’s radio service by
Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m.- Music.
3.Zero p.m.: Discuss. 3.15 p.m.: Shut down 5.30
p.m.: Kids’s session, by Uncle George.
7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market studies, by New
Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Company Ltd
7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: Sid and Molly
Owen and Joyce Slatyer, instrumentalists.
8.10 p.m.: Songs by Mr. Leon Noveiio. 8.20
p.m.: A humorous interlude by M>- Jack
Win and Mr. Heath Burdock. 8.25 p.m.:
Pianoforte solos by Miss Ruth Pearce
Jones. 8.35 p.m.: Songs by Miss Heather
Kinnaird. 8.45 p.m.: Violin solos by Mr
Edmund Collins. 8.55 p.m:. A humorous
interlude. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate report. 9.3
p.m.: Handle. 9.15 p.m.: Songs by Mr.
Leon Novello. 9.25 p.m.: Sid and Molly
Owen and Joyce Slatyer. 9.35 p.m.: Songs
by Miss Heather Kinnaird. 9.45 p.m.: A
humorous interlude. 9.50 p.m.: Violin solos
by Mr. Edmund Collins. 10.Zero p.m.: Orches-
tral music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down.
1

P.40 – Noyes Bros Advert[edit]

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P.41 – Interstate Programmes, Wednesday, January 9[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Wednesday, January 9
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION—7.IS a.m.: Morning
melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workout routines to music.
7.30 a.m.: Basic information. 8.Zero a.m.: Melbourne Ob-
servatory time indicators. 8.1 a.m.: Morning melo-
dies. 8.15 a.m.: Shut down. MORNING SESSION.
—ll.O a.m.: 3LO’s completely different dainties for the every day
dinner. To-day’s radio recipe, Oatmeal Biscuits.
11.5 a.m.: Miss L. D. Beavan, “Residence-made Con-
fectionery.” 11.20 a.m.: Musical interlude. 11.25
a.m.: Mrs. H. Callaway Mahood, “Coloration in De-
coration.” 11.40 a.m.: Gramophone recital. MID-
DAY NEWS SESSION—I2.O midday: Melbourne Ob-
servatory time sign. Specific prepare info.
12.1 p.m.: British official wi-fi information from
Rugby. Reuter’s and the Australian Press Asso-
ciation. “Argus” information service. 12.15 p.m.: New-
market inventory gross sales. Particular report by John
M’Namara and Co. 12.20 p.m.: Johnston’s studio
boys. March, “London’s Satisfaction.” Overture, “King
Edward.” 12.30 p.m.: Keith Desmond (elocution-
ist) will give a brief recital. 12.37 p.m.: Inventory
Trade info. 12.40 p.m.: Johnston’s
Studio Boys. March, “Silverwood.” Cornet solo,
“Love’s Previous, Candy Music.” 12.47 p.m.: Valerie
Walsh (contralto). “Away In Athlone” (Lohr).
“For the Inexperienced” (Lohr). Jo Vis ton’s Studio
Boys. Waltz, “Imaginative and prescient of Salome.” Half
music. “Candy and Low.” 1.11 p.m.: Meteoro-
logical info. Climate forecast for Vic-
toria, South Australia, New South Wales, and Tas-
mania. Ocean forecasts. River studies. Rain-
fall. 1.17 p.m.: Valerie Walsh (contralto). “The
Shepherd’s Music” (Elgar). “Three Inexperienced Bon-
nets” (d’Hardelot). 1.24 p.m.: Johnston’s Studio
Boys. “Prelude in C Minor” (Rachmaninoff).
1.30 p.m.: Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give
a brief recital. 1.37 p.m.: Johnston’s Studio Boys.
March, “Freedom.” Cornet solo, “Roses of
Picardy.” 1.45 p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON
SESSlON—(Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. Accom-
panist: Agnes Fortune.) 1.59 p.m.: Description
of Maiden Plate, 5 furloQgs, at Woodend Races,
by Eric Welch. 2.5 p.m.: The station orchestra.
Fantasle, “Andrea Chenier” (Giordane). 2.15
p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano). “My Coronary heart is
Sair for Anyone” (Previous Scotch). “Cornin’ Thro’
the Rye.” 2.22 p.m.: The station orchestra,
choice, “Erinnerungen” (Grieg). 2.28 p.m.: De-
scription of Mayfield Handicap, 5 furlongs, Wooden-
finish Races. 2.35 p.m.: Syd. Hollister (comic).
“Verbal Vignettes.” 2.42 p.m.: A. Anderson
(clarinet). “Andante and Polonaise” (Le Thiere).
2.47 p.m.: The station orchestra. Choice, “Tor-
quate Tasso” (Donizetti). 2.55 p.m.: John Byrne
(bass, by permission J. C. Williamson, Ltd.). 3.3
p.m.: The station orchestra. “Rondo Pastoral’
(Beethoven). “Largo” (Beethoven). 3.Eight p.m.:
Description of Summer time Handicap, 1 mile, Wooden-
finish Races. 3.15 p.m.: Victor Baxter (tenor).
“Rosemary” (Ladborough). 3.22 p.m.: Joseph Bar-
rille (flute). “Rezance” (Langey). 3.27 p.m.:
The station orchestra. “Suite Ballet”’ (Peoy).
3.37 p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano), “The Violet’
(Mozart). Chosen. 3.44 p.m.: The station or-
chestra. “The Purple Vine” (Ancliffe). 3.48 p.m.:
Description of Novice Handicap, 5 furlongs, Wooden-
finish Races. 3.55 p.m.: Myrtle Robertson (violin).
“Capzonettsr (Godard). 4.2 p.m,: Syd. Hol-
lister (comic). “A Laughable Lecturette.’
4.9 p.m.: The station orchestra. “Gipsy Pic-
tures.” 4.18 p.m.: Description of Macedon Three-
year-old Handicap, Woodend Races. 4.25 p.m.:
John Byrne (bass). 4.32 p.m.: The station or-
chestra. Suite, “From the South” (Nicode). 4.40
p.m.: Victor Baxter (tenor). “A Dream” (Bart-
lett). “Uncle Rome” (Homer). 4.48 p.m.: De-
scription of Hillside Highweight Handicap, 6V4
furlongs, Woodend Races. 4.55 p.m.: “Herald”
information session. Inventory Trade info. Dur-
ing the afternoon progress scores of the cricket
match, England v. Bendigo, can be broadcast as
they arrive handy. 5.10 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer: Frank Hather-
ley.) 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday
greetings bv “Mary Mary.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical
interlude. 6.30 p.m.: “Mary, Mary” will inform you
tales of “The Gingerbread Man,” a nonsense
story; “The Letter that Flew Away,” a narrative of
a birthday celebration. NIGHT SESSlON—(Announcer
John Stuart. Accompanist: Agnes Fortune.) 7.5
fc.m.: Inventory Trade info. 7.15 p.m.:
Market studies by John M’Namara and Co. Offi-
cial report of the Newmarket inventory gross sales by the
Related Inventory and Station Brokers. Bourke
Avenue, Melbourne. Climate synopsis. Fish mar-
ket studies by J. E. Borrett, Ltd. Market re-
ports by the ‘ Victorian Producers’ Co-operative
Co., Ltd. Poultry, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy
produce, potatoes, and onions. Market studies Of
fruit by the Related Fruitgrowers’ Affiliation.
Retail costs. Wholesale costs of fruit by the
Wholesale Fruit Retailers’ Affiliation. Citrus
fruits’. 7.30 p.m.: Information service. Stumps scores,
cricket match. England v. Bendigo. 7.43 p.m.:
Birthday greetings. 7.45 p.m.: Out of the Previous.
7.46 p.m.: Below the auspices of the Division
of Agriculture, Mr. R. Crowe, exports superintend-
ent, Will communicate on “Advertising Strategies.” 8.0
p.m.: A Maker of Historical past. 9.18 p.m.: Professor R.
J. A. Berry, “Chicago, the Metropolis Stunning.” 9.30
n.m.: The station orchestra. Suite, “Callirhoe”
(Chaminade). 9.40 p.m.: Adelaide Meuleman (so-
prano), “O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Go away Me”
(Handel). “The Echo Music,” with flute obbligato
by J. Barrille (Bishop). 9.47 p.m.: The station
orchestra. “Dieuxieme Petite Suite” (Michiele).
9.54 p.m.: Bernard Manning (bass). 10.1 p.m.:
Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief re-
cital. 10.Eight p.m.: The station orchestra. “Memento
and Serenade” (Geehl). 10.15 p.m.: “Argus” information
session. British official Wi-fi information from Rugby.
Meteorological info. Bulletins. 10.25
p.m.: Adelaide Meuleman (soprano). “Solveig’s
Music” (Grieg). “Theme and Variations” (Proch).
Flute obbligato by J. Barrille. 10.32 p.m.: The
station orchestra. “Largo, ’op. 10” (Beethoven).
10.40 p.m.: Bernard Manning (bass). 10.47 p.m.:
Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief re-
cital. 10.54 p.m.: Our Nice Thought for to-
day is: “The tongue of a idiot is the important thing of his
counsel” (Socrates). 10.55 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
“Googily-Goo” (Davis), “Guess Who’s in City”
(Razalf). “That Stolen Melody” (Fisher). “Le-
nora” (Gilbert). “Chloe” (Kahn). “That’s What
You Imply to Me” (Davis). “Lazy Ft,” piano
solo (Masman). “Simply Like a Melody Out of the
Sky” (Donaldson). “Beloved” (Kahn). “As a result of
My Child Don’t Imply Perhaps Now” (Donaldson).
“I Like to Dunk a Hunk of Sponge Cake” (Cas-
until). “Rain” (Ruby). “Ramona” (Wayne).
“Clarinet Marmalade” (Fergus). “Nebraska”
(Revel). “Eternally Extra” (Barnet). 11.40 p.m.:
God Save the King.
3AR
MORNING SESSION—IO.O a.m.: G.P.O. clock says
“Ten.” 10.1 a.m.: “Age” Inventory Trade studies.
London steel market. “Age” market studies.
Farm and station produce, fruit, fish, greens,
and so forth. 10.25 a.m.: “Age” delivery studies. Ocean
forecast. 10.30 a.m.: Mail notices. Specific prepare
info. 10.35 a.m.: “Age” information service, ex-
clusive to 3AR. 10.59 a.m.: Climate forecast.
MORNING MUSICAL SESSlON.—(Announcer: C.
M. Hocking.) 11.Zero a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces.
“Down Upon the Sands” (Hamy). “Mallika”
(Reel). “You Stated Good-night, however You Meant
Goodbye”, (Kahn). “The Desert Music” (Romberg).
11.20 a.m.: Vocal versatility, chosen. 11.25 a.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “One Alone” (Rom-
berg). “Meet Me To-day” (Dean). “As soon as Once more”
(Lumsdaine). “Drained Palms” (Woods). 11.45
a.m.: Vocal versatility. 11.50 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces. “Too Busy” (Miller). “Candy Sue,
Simply You” (Tobias). “In a Bamboo Backyard”
(Donaldson). “Something You Say” (Donaldson).
12 midday: Vocal versatility. 12.5 p.m.: Interlude.
Captain Donald M’Lean. 12.20 p.m.: Ned Tyr-
rell’s Radi-o-Aces. “Lonely Acres” (Robinson).
“Shake It Down” (Williams). “Subsequent to You, I
Like Me Subsequent to You” (Bito). 12.30 p.m.: British
official wi-fi information. Bulletins. 12.40 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “What Was I to Do”
(Reid). “Chinatown” (Yvain). “The Riff Music”
(Romberg). “A Lonesome Boy’s Rosary” (Tobias).
12.50 p.m.: Vocal versatility. 12.55 p.m.: Ned
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “Excessive Up on a Hilltop”
(Baer). “Inform Me Once more” (Clark). “Ups and
Downs” (Rose). “Mississippi Mud” (Harris). 1.5
p.m.: Vocal versatility. 1.10 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces, “Lolita” (Stoneham) “With out You,
Sweetheart” (De Silva), “Dream Kisses” (Yel-
len), “Lenora” (Gilbert). 1.20: Vocal versatility.
I. p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Vir-
ginia Creeper (Wade), “Little Log Cabin of
Goals” (Hanley), “Blissful-go-lucky Lane”
(Lewis), “All Day Lengthy” (Cross). 1.30
p.m.: Shut down. EVENING SESSION. —(An-
nouncer: Frank Hatherley.) 6.Zero p.m.: Choices
on the Seraphina. 7.50 n.m.: Outcomes of cricket,
England v. Bendigo. NIGHT SESSlON—(Communicate-
ers: H. Webb, C. W. Recreation. Artists: Violet Jack-
son, Ned Tyrrell, Syd. Hollister.) Coburg Metropolis
Band (conductor T. B. Davison). (Announcer:
Frank Hatherley.) 8.Zero p.m.: H. Webb, supervisor
of the Tasmanian Authorities Vacationer Division,
will communicate on “Tasmania’s Mining Business.” 8.15
p.m.: C. W. Recreation. A bit speak to Scouts’ par-
ents. 8.30 p.m.: A studio live performance. Coburg Metropolis
Band. March, “The Storm Fiend” (Greenwood).
Waltz, “Ricordanza.” 8.40 p.m.: Violet Jackson
(soprano). “My Ships” (Barratt). “Blissful
Music” (Riego). 8.47 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band.
“Hawaiian Hilos.” Waltz, “Golden Sunbeams”
(Rimmer). 8.57 p.m.’ Ned Tyrrell (banjo).
Chosen. 9.Four p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band. Inter-
mezzo, “Southern Smiles” (Kelly). March, “The
Middy” (Alford). 9.11 p.m.: Syd. Hollister. “Hin-
dered Holidays.” 9.18 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band.
Waltz, “Fascination.” 9.28 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell
(banjo). Chosen. 9.35 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band.
Intermezzo, “Golden Sands.” 9.42 p.m.: An-
nouncements. 9.47 p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano).
“Moonlight” (Schumann). “The Lotus Flower”
(Schumann). 9.54 p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band.
Chosen. 9.57 p.m.: Syd. Hollister will entertain
you. 10.Four p.m.: Coburg Metropolis Band. Overture,
“Veronica” ’(Raynor), March, “Anglo-Oriental”
(Hume). 10.20 p.m.: “Age” information service, exclu-
sive to 3AR. Outcomes of Check cricket, England v.
Bendigo. 10.30 p.m.: Our Shakespearean good-
evening citation is from “King Richard H.”—
“The purest treasure mortal instances afford
Is spotless status; that away,
Males are however gilded loam, or painted clay,
A jewel in a ten-times barred-up chest
Is a daring spirit In a loyal breast.
Mine honor is my life; each develop in a single;
Take honor from me, and my life is finished.”
God Save the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSlON.—(Announcer: J. Ty-
son.) 7.43 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information
service. 8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical data. 8.15
a.m.: Information service. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION—II.O a.m.: Music. 11.5 a.m.:
Social information. 11.15 a.m.: A chat on “Creative Makes use of
of Sealing Wax and Crepe Paper,” by “Denise.”
11. a.m.: Music. 11.35 a.m.: Extra social information.
11.45 a.m.: Music. 12.Zero Midday: Shut down. MID-
BAY SESSlON.—(Announcer: R. Wight.) 1.Zero p.m.;
Market studies and climate info. 1.15
p.m.: From the G.P.O—The Postal Institute Or”
chestra. 2.Zero p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON
SESSION.—3.O p.m.: A programme of electrically
reproduced data. 3.30 p.m.: Mall prepare run-
ning instances. 3.31 p.m.: From St. John’s Cathedral
—A recital by Mr. George Sampson, F.R.C.O. (Metropolis
Organist). 4.Zero p.m.: Afternoon information. 4.30 p.m.:
Shut down. EARLY EVENING SESSlON.—(An-
nouncers: R. Wight and H. Humphreys.) 6.Zero p.m.:
Mail prepare operating instances; mail info; ship-
ping information. 6.5 p.m.: Some electrically repro-
duced data. 6.25 p.m.: Business announce-
ments. 6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, carried out by
“Little Miss Brisbane.” 7.Zero p.m.: Information in short.
7.5 p.m.: Inventory Trade information. 7.6 p.m.: Steel
quotations. 7.7 p.m.: Market studies. 7.25 p.m.:
Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate in-
formation. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins. 7.43 p.m.:
Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lecturette, ar-
ranged by the Queensland Agricultural Excessive College
and School. NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer: H.
Humphreys.) 8.Zero p.m.: From the Studio—Alf.
Featherstone and his Orchestra: Fox-trot, “Mom
Goose Parade” (Brean); fox-trot, “After All i
Adore You” (Richardson). 8.10 p.m.: Harry
Humphreys in a comedy flip—“A Pleasant Chat
Throughout the Fence on Washing Day.” 8.20 p.m.:
Alf Featherstone and his Orchestra —Fox-trot,
“You’re a Actual Sweetheart” (Pal); fox-trot,
“Lonesome within the Moonlight” (Baer). 8.30 p.m.:
Mabel Malouf (soprano), “A Coronary heart That’s Free’
(Robyn). 8.38 p.m.: Alf. Featherstone and his
Orchestra—Fox-trot, “The Tutti Frutti Music’
(C’Flynn); fox-trot, “Who’s That Knocking At
Mv Door” (Kahn). 8.48 p.m.: Feo Todd (elo-
cutionist)—“Specifically Jim”; “The Damaged Prayer.’
8.55 p.m.: Alf. Featherstone and his Orchestra-
jazz waltz, “Jeannine” (Skilhert). 9.Zero p.m.: Met-
ropolitan climate forecast; actions of light-
home steamers. 9.1 p.m.: Beryl Pratten (pian-
tste)— I “Dance Negre” (Cyril Scott), “Dancing Doll
(Pcldini). 9.Eight p.m.: Alf. Featherstone and his
Orchestra —Fox-trot, “Throughout the Avenue From
Heaven” (Newman); fox-trot, Pretty Little Sil-
houette” (Rose). 9.18 p.m.: The Merrymakers—
Nat Gould (banjo, ukulele, and guitar), Grace
Gculd (piano), R. Eire (baritone), in 1 / 4
of an hour’s melody. 9.33 p.m.: Alf. Featherstone
and his Orchestra—Fox-trot, “O, You Have No
Thought’ (Dougherty); fox-trot, “Previous Original Loc-
ket” (Winbrow). 9.43 p.m.: W. Burch (bass)—
“Mate of Mine” (Davis); “Shipmates of Mine
(Sanderson). 10.Zero p.m.: The “Day by day Mail” information;
the “Courier” information; climate information. 10.15 p.m..
Alf. Featherstone and his Orchestra— Three-quar-
ters of an hour’s dance music. 11.Zero p.m.: Shut
down.
5CL
MORNING SESSlON.—Announcer: Athol Lykke.
Accompaniste: Jean Finlay, 11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O.
chimes. 11.1 a.m.: Pianoforte recital, Columbia
recordings, by Myra Hess, “Sonata in A Main
(Schubert). Elements 1 and a couple of, Allegro Moderato (m
two elements). Half 3, Andante (first half). Half
4, Andante (concluded). Allegro (first half). 11.15
a.m.: “Economist,” speak on menu and kitchen
craft. 11.30 a.m.: A range programme. Colum-
through data. Frank Webster, tenor “A Temper
(Travers)/ “A Frivolous Ballad” (Slater). Gil
Dech, pianist, “Lay My Head Beneath a Rose
(Falkenstein), “I’d Climb the Highest Mountain’
(Clare). Frank Webster, tenor, ‘I Know of Two
Vibrant Eyes” (Clutsam), “So Fare Thee Nicely
(Collier). Cherniavsky Trio, instrumentalists,
“Scherzo” trio in B flat (Schubert), “Spanish
Serenade” (Chaminade-Kreisler). Edga Coyle,
baritone, “Eleanore” (Coleridge Taylor), “A Mem-
ory” (Goring). Milton Charles, Wurlitzer, “When
Day is Carried out” (De Sylva), “Simply As soon as Once more” (Ash),
Amy Castles, soprano, “The Rosary” (Nevm),
“Waters of Minnetonka” (Lieurance). 12.15 p.m.:
“Advertiser” information service. 12.35 p.m.: British
official wi-fi information. 12.40 p.m . Edga Coyle,
baritone, “Music Cycle,” “The Little White Home
(Arundale). (a) The previous flagged path, (b) The
lavender room, (c) The smoking room, (d) The
evening nurserv. Miiton Charles, on the Wurlitzer,
“Forgive Me” (Yellen), “Russian Lullaby” (Ber-
lin). 12.50 p.m.: S.A.R. info. 12.51 p.m.:
5. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade info.
12.57 p.m.: Meteorological info. 1.Zero p.m.:
G.P.O. chimes. Alfred Cortot and the Interna-
tional String Quartet (Mangeot-Pecker-Howard-
Withers). H.M.V. recordings. Quintet in F Minor
(Cesar Franck). First motion, molto moderato
quasi lento, elements 1 and a couple of. First motion, molto
moderato quasi lento, elements Three and 4. Second
motion, lento con molto sentimento, elements 1 and
2. Third motion, allegro non troppo ma cpn
fuoco, elements 1 and a couple of. 1.32 p.m.: Paul Jeacle, saxa-
cellphone, “Saxaphobia” (Wiedoft), “Mighty Lak a
Rose.” 1.38 p.m.: Denis Sheard, tenor, “Lolita
(Buzzi-Peccia), “Macushla” (M’Murrough). 1.44
p.m.: Paul Jeacle, saxaphonist, “Pauline” (Jeacle),
“Oh You Picco” (Jeacle). 1.50 p.m.: Denis Sheard,
tenor. “My Little Banjo” (Dichmcnt), “Till”
(Sanderson). 1.57 p.m.: Inter-State and interna-
tional cricket. 1.59 p.m.: Meteorological informa-
tion. 2.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes and shut down,
AFTERNOON SESSlON.—Announcer. Athol Lykke.
3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 3.1 pm.: Worldwide
cricket scores, England v. Bendigo 3.2 p.m.:
Regent Symphony Orchestra, in a symphonic in-
terlude, below the path of Mr. W. R. Cade.
3.12 p.m.: Diana Belmont, contralto, “Sing, Crimson
Solar,” “When Music is Candy.” 3.18 p.m.: Stanley
A. Brown, trombone soloist, in trombone special-
ties. 3.24 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “When
Thy Blue Eves” ‘Dassen), “When Maiden Loves”
(Yeoman). 3.30 p.m.: Regent Symphony Orches-
tra, incidental music. 3.45 p.m.: Alan Kitson,
entertainer, imitations on the piano and vocal
numbers. 3.51 p.m.: Frank M’Cabe, baritone, “The
Lute Participant” (Allitsen), “Uncle’ Rome” (Homer).
(Continued on web page 43.)

P.42 – Native Programmes, Thursday, January 10[edit]

Native Programmes, Thursday, January 10
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
7 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 7.5
a.m.: Studio music. 7.20 a.m.: Nation
session; official climate forecast, rainfall,
temperatures, astronomical memoranda,
delivery intelligence, mail companies, river
studies. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market,
mining sharemarket, steel quotations. 7.35
a.m.: Wool gross sales, breadstuffs. markets, in-
terstate markets, produce markets. 7.45
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” abstract.
7.50 a.m.: Studio music. Eight a.m.: “Massive
Ben”: shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Massive Ben” and bulletins. 10.2
a.m.: Pianoforte copy. 10.10 a.m.:
“Sydney Morning Herald” information service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.: Final
minute sporting info by the 2FC
racing commissioner. 10.40 a.m.: Studio
music. 10.45 a.m.: A chat on “Pandora.”
11 a.m.: “Massive Ben”; A.P.A. and Reuter’s
cable companies. 11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.,
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
12 midday: “Massive Ben” and bulletins.
12.1 p.m.: Inventory Trade, first name. 12.3
p.m.: Official climate forecast, rainfall.
12.5 p.m.: Studio music. 12.10 p.m.: Sum-
mary of reports, “Sydney Morning Herald.”
12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18:
A studying. 12.30: Studio music. 12.45:
Cricket scores, England v. Bendigo, performed
at Bendigo. 1 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; climate
intelligence. 12.47 p.m.: Studio music.
1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” noon information
service; Producers’ Distributing Society’s
report. 1.20 p.m.: Studio music. 1.28
p.m.: Inventory Trade, second name. 1.30
p.m.: Studio music. 1.50 p.m.: Racing in-
formation by the 2FC racing commissioner.
1.57 p.m.: Cricket scores. 2 p.m.: “Massive
Ben”; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
2.30 p.m.: Programme Bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Recital of chosen data of world
well-known artists. Three p.m.: “Massive Ben”; piano-
forte copy. 3.15 p.m.: Common
music. 3.30 p.m.: From Pitt Avenue Con-
gregational Church, organ recital organized
by Miss Enid Elliptt. 3.45 p.m.: From the
Studio; cricket scores, England v. Bendigo,
performed at Bendigo. 3.46 p.m.: Isabel
Thiselton, soprano, (a) “The Smile of
Spring” (Percy Fletcher), (b) “Mifanwy”
(Forster). 3.53 p.m.: Kathleen Logue, vio-
linist. Four p.m.: “Massive Ben”; from Pitt Avenue
Congregational Church, organ recital by
Miss Enid Elliott. 4.15 p.m.: From the
Studio, Isabel Thiselton, soprano, (a)
“Chuckle and Sing” (Drummond), (b)
“Cheer up, do” (Robert Coverly). 4.22
p.m.: Kathleen Logue, violinist. 4.29 p.m.:
From the Wentworth, The Wentworth Cafe
Dance Orchestra, carried out by Jimmy El-
kins. 4.39 p.m.: From the Studio, Studio
music. 4.44: Cricket scores. 4.45 p.m.:
Third name of the Inventory Trade. 4.47 p.m.:
Common music. 5 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; shut
down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.: The Kids’s Session, carried out
by the “Whats up Man”; letters and tales;
music and leisure.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market studies (wool,
wheat, and inventory).
6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6.43 p.m.: Inventory Trade info.
6.45 p.m.: Climate and delivery information.
6.48 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
6.50 p.m.: Late sporting information.
7 p.m.: “Massive Ben”; late information service.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartet, con-
ducted by Horace Keats.
(a) “Rusticanella” (Cortopassi).
(b) “Valse d’Amour” (Cremieux).
(c) “Songs of the Volga Boatmen” (arr.
Lake).
(d) Three Dances” (Cyril Scott).
(e) “Un Peu d’Amour” (Silesu).
(f) Fox trot.
EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie).
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte copy.
7.52 p.m.: Common music.
Eight p.m.: “Massive Ben”; from the Capitol Theatre,
The Capitol Unit of Leisure.
8.22 p.m.: From the Studio, John Mitchell,
tenor.
8.29 p.m.: Lindley Evans, pianist.
8.41 p.m.: Eileen Boyd, contralto.
8.48 p.m.: To-night’s competitors.
8.58 p.m.: Climate report and forecast.
8.59 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
). 6 p.m.: Chronicles of Creamy Creek, by the
Bush Parson.
9.20 p.m.: From the Capitol Theatre.
945 p.m.: From the studio, Eileen Boyd,
contralto.
9.52 p.m.: Lindley Evans, pianist.
10.Four p.m.: Len. Maurice within the latest music
hits.
10.11 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia, Cec.
Morrison’s Dance Band.
10.25 p.m.: From the Studio; late climate
forecast.
10.26 p.m.: Len. Maurice within the latest song-
hits.
10.33 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia, Cec.
Morrison’s Dance Band.
10.57 p.m.: From the Studio, To-morrow’s
programme.
10.59 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia, Cec.
Morrison’s Dance Band.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes. 8.25 a.m.: Studio
music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
studio music. 8.35 a.m.: Data,
mails, delivery, arrivals, departures,
and sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information from
the “Day by day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.45
a.m.: G.P.O. Clock and chimes; studio
music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
studio music. 9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with
silent pals. 10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes;shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Ladies’s Sports activities Affiliation session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Ladies’s
session, carried out by Mrs. Cranfield. 12.
midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast and climate forecast. 12.3
p.m.: Pianoforte copy. 12.30 p.m.:
Transport and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market
studies. 12.45 p.m.: Cricket scores, Eng-
land v. Bendigo, performed at Bendigo. 12.48
p.m.: “Solar” noon information service. 1 p.m.:
Studio music. 1.30 p.m.: Discuss to kids
and particular leisure for kids in
hospital. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
cricket scores, England v.. Bendigo, performed
at Bendigo. 3.47 p.m.: Studio music. 3.50
p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orchestra, conduct-
ed by Bennie Abrahams. Four p.m.: The
chimes oi the G.P.O. clock; from the studio
Kathleen Nicholls, soprano—(a) “Come up
O Solar” (Day), (b) “She Wandered Down
the Mountain Aspect.” 4. ( p.m.: Captain
Fred Aarons—Thriller Collection—“ The Black
Cat.” 4.20 p.m.: Romano’s Dance Or-
chestra, carried out by Bennie Abrahams
4.30 p.m.: From the studio, Kathleen Nich-
ols, soprano—(a) “Chosen,” (b) “Annie
Laurie” (Lehman). 4.37 p.m.: James
Walker, pianist, “Music with out Phrases in
E Main” (Mendelssohn). 4.47 p.m.: “Solar”
information service. 4.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, carried out by Bennie Abrahams.
5 p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
from the studio, “Our Serial Story.” 5.10
p.m.: James Walker, pianist, “Schubert
Impromptu in A Flat.” 5.20 p.m.: Popu-
lar music. 5.37 p.m.: Options of the even-
ing’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Kids’s session—music and en-
tertainment.
6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet-
la) “A Spring Day” (Harris),
(b) “My Dream” (Waldetuefl).
(c) “Three Dream Dances” (Coleridge-
Taylor),
(d) “Winds within the Timber” (Goring –
TRomas),
(e) “Waltz” (Carreno).
(f) “Serenata” (Mascagni).
7.10 p.m.: Cricket scores.
7.12 p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s Report; climate report and
forecast by courtesy of Authorities Me-
teorologist; Producers’ Distributing Socie-
ty’s fruit and vegetable market report;
grain and fodder report (“Solar”); dairy
produce report (“Solar”); weekly site visitors
bulletin.
7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam in adver-
tising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; from the
Manresa Corridor. North Sydney—the North
Sydney Tramway Band.
8.15 p.m.: From the studio, Laurie Oaks,
baritone.
3.22 p.m.: Christopher Faulkner, cornet solos.
8.29 p.m.: Cliff Gane. comic.
8.36 p.m.: Ivy Saxton, within the latest music
hits.
843 p.m.: From the Manresa Corridor—the North
Sydney Tramway Band.
9 p.m.: From the studio, G.P.O. clock and
chimes.
Climate report.
9.1 p.m.: Ambrose Bourke and Mary M’Cor-
mack, vocal duets.
9.Eight p.m.: Rene Wealthy, violinist.
9.15 p.m.: Leo Rowan, tenor.
9.22 p.m.: From Manresa Corridor, North Sydney
—the North Sydney Tramway Band.
9.37 p.m.: From the studio, Laurie Oaks,
baritone.
9.44: Christopher Faulkner, cornetist.
9.51 p.m.: Ivy Saxton within the latest music
hits.
9.58 p.m.: Cliff Gane, comic.
10.5 p.m. Leo Rowan, tenor.
10.12 p.m.: Rene Wealthy, violinist.
10.19 p.m.: Ambrose Bourke and Mary M’Cor-
mack.
10.27 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.

3.56 p.m.: Diana Belmont, contralto, “A Black-
fowl Singing” (Heal), “Nocturne” 4.2 p.m.: In-
ternational cricket scores, England V. Bendigo,
4.Three p.m.: Regent Symphony Orchestra, symphonic
alternatives. 4.15 p.m.; Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “The
Coronary heart W’orships” (Holst), “Pierrot” (Rybner). 4.21
p.m.: Stanley A. Brown, trombone soloist, in
particular alternatives. 4.27 p.m.: Frank M‘Cabe, bari-
tone, “I’ll Sing Thee Songs of Araby” (Clay), “The
Pirate” (Male’y). 4.33 p.m.: Alan Kitson, enter-
tainer, in piano specialties. 4.39 p.m.: Regent
Symphony Orchestra, incidental music. 4.55 p.m.:
S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Trade info.
4.56 p.m.: Worldwide cricket scores, England v.
Bendigo. 5.Zero n.m.: G.P.O. chimes and shut down.
EVENING SESSlON—Announcer: J. L. Norris. 6.0
p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 6.1 p.m.: Worldwide
cricket scores, England v. Bendigo. 6.5 p.m.:
Kids’s completely happy moments, birthday greetings,
correspondence, songs, and tales, by “Miss Wire-
much less.” 6.30 p.m.: Musical interlude of dinner
music on the Sonora. Parlophone recordings. 6.55
p.m.. Outcomes of Woodend races. 6.59 p.m.: In-
ternational cricket scores, England v. Bendigo.
7.Zero pun.: G.P.O. chimes. 7.1 p.m..: S, C. Ward
and Co.’s Inventory Trade Data. 7.5 p.m.:
Basic market studies. 7.10 n.m.- Rev. E. S. Kiek,
M.A., 8.D., “The Sleep Justice.” In his “speak”
Principal Kiek will illustrate from the reign of
Stephen the damage that comes on a land wsen
Authorities falls in its major dutj—the main-
tenance of regulation and order. 7.25 :in : Boy Scouts’
nook. 7.40 p.m.: 5CL’s Blue Chicken Women’ Membership,
leisure by “The Chicken Woman NIGHT SES-
SION.—B.O p.m.: G.P.O. chimes 8.1 p.m.: Diana
Belmont, contralto, “The Day by day Query,” -“Tile
Winds are Calling” (Ronald). 8.6 p.m.: Jean
Finlay, accomnaniste, “Valse Caprice” (Scott).
8.9 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “The Early
Morning.” 8.15 p.m.: An evening of novelty by the
well-known Humphrey Bishop English Comedy and
Operatic Firm. 8.30 p.m.: Promenade the studio,
meteorological info. 3.31 p.m.: Diana
Belmont, contralto, “Forethought” (Lambert).
835 p.m.: Jean Finlay, pianis)* 1 “Danse Neere”
(Scott). 8.38 p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo, “I Will
Not Grieve” (Schumann). 8.41 p.m.: An evening of
novelty (continued) by Humphrey Bishop and his
well-known English Comedy and Operatic Firm.
10.15 p.m.: From the studio, the “Advertiser”
basic information service; British, official wi-fi information;
Woodend race outcomes; meteorological info.
10.29 p.m.: Our good-night thoughi, “Many issues
tough to design show simple of efficiency.” 10.30
p.m.- By courtesy of 3LO, Melbourne, trendy dance
numbers by the fimous Radi-o-Aces. 11.10 p.m.:
God Save the King.

P.43 – Interstate Programmes, Thursday, January 10[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Thursday, January 10
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.IS a.m.: Morning
melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workout routines to music.
7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies; market studies; .basic
information; delivery; sporting info. Eight a.m.: Mel-
bourne Observatory time sign. 8.1 a.m.: Morning
melodies. 8.15 a.m.: Shut down. MORNING
SESSION. — (Announcer: C. J. O’Connor.) 11 a.m.:
3LO’S Completely different Danties for the Day by day Dinner.
To-day’s Radio Recipe: 11.5 a.m.: Sister Purcell
will communicate on “Toddler Welfare.” 11.20 a.m.: Mu-
sical interlude. 11.25 a.m.: Mrs. Henrietta C.
Walker, “The Artwork of Being a Settler —Summer time
Issues.” 12 midday: Melbourne Observatory time
sign. Specific prepare info. 12.1 p.m.:
Costs acquired by the Australian Mines and Metals
Affiliation from the London Inventory Trade this
day; British official wi-fi information from Rugby;
Reuter’s and the Australian Press Affiliation
cables; “Argus” information service.. 12.15 p.m.: New-
market inventory gross sales; particular report by John M’Na-
mara and Co, 12.20 p.m.: Neighborhood Singing,
transmitted from the King’s Theatre, Russell
Avenue. Melbourne. Previous-time Choruses, carried out
by Frank Hatherley. Soloist, Bernard Manning
(by permission J. C. Williamson, Ltd.) 1.45 p.m.:
Inventory Trade info; meterological infor-
mation; climate forecast for Victoria, Tasmania,
New’ South Wales, and South Australia; ocean fore-
solid; river studies; rainfall. 1.55 p.m.: Shut
down. AFTERNOON SESSION.— (Affnouncer: C
J O’Connor. Accompaniste: Agnes Fortune.) 2.10
p.m.: The Strad Trio (Cecil Parkes, violin; ( Could
Broderick, piano; Frank Johnstone, ’cello.) “Trio
in B Flat” (Mozart), Allegro, Larghetto, Allegretto.
2 32 p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano, “Fairings” and
“Come to the Truthful” (Enathope Martin) 2.39
p.m.: Could Broderick and Cecil Parkes. piano and
violin, “Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 30 No.
Three in G Main” (Beethoven), Allegro Assai, Menu-
ette. Allegro Vivaco. 2.54 p.m.: Freda Treweek,
mezzo “Daybreak Mild Flower” (Sterndale Ben-
nett) “The Silver Ring” (Chaminade), 3.1 p.m.:
The Strad Trio, “Songs With out Phrases” (Mendel-
ssohn), “Gavotte” (Gossee), “Cannon (Lavator),
“Marche Militaire” (Schubert). 3.12 p.m.. Vic-
tor Baxter, tenor, “Songs My Mom Me
(Dvorak), “I Hear a Thrush at Eye (Cadmann
3 19 p.m.: The Station Quartette, ‘ Final Motion
Quartette” (Beethoven). 3. 29 p.m.T Violet.
son soprano, “Mom Bids Me Bind My Han
instructed English), “Ye Banks . and Braes” (O d
Scotch) 3.36 p.m.: The Station Orchestra, Suite
of 4” (Frlml). 3.46 p.m.: J. Alexander Browne
baritone, two Air-Power songs, Billy,
Pinest Job of All” (Eric Coates). 3.53 P- m –
The Station Orchestra. 4.5 p.m.: Molly Mackay •
Soprano, “Evensong (Lehmann), The Lorelei
iTiszt) 4 10 p.m.: Agnes Fortune, piano, Ro-
mance” (Schuman). 4.17 p.m.’ Victor Baxter
tenor, “At Night time” Rachmaninoff), Timber (Ras
bach). 4.24 p.m.: The Station Orchestra “An-
darwte from Sonata .. 7 ” “Son
t Aipvcmripr Browne, baritone, T.ne Keoei, pun
of ‘Mine” from “The Freebooter Songs’ (William
Wallace) 4 41 p.m.: Sonora Recital. 5 p.m..
“Herald”’ information service; Inventory Trade informa-
tion Throughout the afternoon progress scores in
the ‘cricket ilatch, England v. Bendigo can be
broadcast as they arrive handy. 5.10 p.m.. A
ceptances and barrier positions for the Epsom
rnfips on Saturday, January 12. 5.15 p.m.. oiose
down EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer: Frank
Hatherlev) 6 p.m.: Solutions to letters and
Srthdav greetings by “Bobby Bluegum.” 6.25 p.m :
M slcaT interlude. 6.30 p.m.: “Bobby Bluegum”;
Songs and tales. NIGHT SESSlON.—(Announcer:
Songs s Accompaniste: Agnes Fortune )
?’ 15 p m!” The Radio; Inventory Trade. 7.5 p.m.:
Inventory Trade info. 7.15 p.m.: Market
studies. 7.30 p.m.: Information session 7 43 p.m:
wirtbriav greetings. 7.45 p.m.. Out ci tne rrasr.
7 46 p m ® Leon Gordon, now showing on the
“New Comedy Theatre,” will communicate to you from
hie Hresaine: room, by permission J- C. William
son Ltd Eight p.m.: A maker of historical past. Eight 1 p.m.:
Rod M’Gregor will communicate on “Cricket. 8.15 p.m..
The Radi – o – Aces, “The Loyal Legion ’ (Sousa),
“Prepared for the River” (Moret), “Dreaming
i«iwTri 8 24 nm.‘ Syd. Hollister, comic,
“Three Mhiute/Enjoyable.” 8.27 p.m.: The. Radi-o-
Aces “In a Honeymoon Cottage” (Lumsdaine),_ Do
You’’’ (Piantadesi), “Excessive Up On a Hilltop
(Baer). 8.36 p.m.: Molly Mackay soprano,
“There are Fairies on the Backside of My Backyard
iTehmann). 8.39 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, ‘Why
Can’t You Care” (Gilbert), “How Lengthy Has This
Sweetheart’*’
(Fi-iend), “Dusky Stevedore” (Baalf), Beside a
Lazy Stream” (Stept). 9 p.m.: J. ,^ eXi f nt ! 1 e q
Browne, baritone, “The Floral Dance” , (Moss) 9.3
p.m. The Radi-o-Aces. “Cinnamon Cake (Bemaid ,
“Paradise” (Zamecnik), “Afraid (Barnie). 9.12
p m ’ Syd. Hollister, comic, a Little. Nonsense.
9 15″ n.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Night Star
(Turk) “You Are Great” (Ash), Simply Like
a Melody Out of the Sky” (Donaldsmi). 9.24
nm‘ Molly Mackay, soprano, Robins Music
(White) 9)27 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Chiquita”
(Wayne), “Scorching Ivories” (Sinastra), “There Ought
to be a Legislation Towards That” (Pal). 9.36 p.m..
Keith Desmond, elocutionist, will give a. brief
fpcital 9.39 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, Oh, Ya. Ya
(Frich), “Rain” (Ruby), “Mine, All Mine” (Ruby).
9.48 p.m.: J. Alexander Browne, baritone, A
Tumbledown Nook by the Sea” (M‘Kenzie). 9.51
p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “My Blackbirds are Blue-
birds Now” (Pal), “Dream Home” (Fox), “Obtained-
ta Massive Date with a .Little Lady” (Tobias). 10
p m ‘ “Argus’Vmews service; British official wire-
much less information from Rugby; meteorological info;
bulletins. 10.15 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces,
“Constantinople” (Carlton), “Stunning”, (Gilles-
pie.i, “Tne Dance of the Blue Danube” (Fisher).
10.24 p.m.: Syd. Hollister, comic, “Hollister-
isms.” 10.27 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Minnetonka”
(Wallace), “Simply Preserve Singing a Music” (Sissell),
“Is it Gonna Be Lengthy” (Whiting). 10.36 p.m.;
Molly Mackay, soprano. “Second Minuet” (Lesley’.
10.39 p.m.; The Radi-o-Aces. “le Goes Like This”
(Caesar). “Roses of Yesterday” (Berlin), “Eternally
Extra” (Burnett). 10.40 p.m.: Keith Desmond,
elocutionist, will give a brief recital. 10.51 p.m.:
The Radi-o-Aces, “Nebraska” (Sisk), ■ “That’s My
Weak spot Now” (Stept), “Get Out and Get Below
the Moon” (Tobias). 11 p.m.: Our Nice Thought
for To-day is: “Private liberty is the paramount
important to human dignity and human happi-
ness” (Bulwer Lyttoni. 11.1 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces, “In a Bamboo Backyard” (Donaldson), “Any-
factor You Say” (Donaldson), “Alabama Stamp”
(Creamer), “One Alone” (Romberg!, “The Desert
Music” (Romberg), “Jabaly Stroll” (Inexperienced), “Be-
trigger My Child Don’t Imply Perhaps Now” (Donald-
soni “Chloe” (Moreti, “Good Night time Waltz” (Bibo),
Good Night time Music” (Bibo). 11.40 p.m.: God Save
the King.
3AR
(Announcer: C. M. Hosking.) 10.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock
says “Ten.” 10.1 a.m.: “Age” Inventory Trade re-
ports, London steel market; “Age” market re-
ports—farm and station produce, fruit, fish, vege-
tables, and so forth. 10.25 a.m.: “Age” delivery studies;
Ocean forecast. 10.30 a.m.: Mail notices; categorical
prepare info. 10.35 a.m.: “Age” information ser-
vice, unique to 3AR. 10.59 a.m.: Climate fore-
solid. MORNING MUSICAL SESSION—II.O a.m.: Ned
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Don’t Preserve Me within the
Darkish, Vibrant Eyes” (Bryan), “Down The place the
Solar Goes Down” (Jones), “Dolores” (Kassell),
“Mine, All Mine” (Ruby). 11.10 a.m.: Vocal varia-
tions. 11.15 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
“Rain” (Ford), “Simply Like a Melody Out of the
Sky” (Donaldson), “As a result of My Child Don’t Imply
Perhaps Now” (Donaldson). 11.25 a.m.: Vocal vari-
ations. 11.30 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
“Guess Who’s in City” (Razayi. “My Blackbirds
are Bluebirds Now” (Pal), “Louisiana” (Scha-
fer) 1140 a.m.: Vocal variations. 11.45 a.m.:
Ned’ Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces— “Lonely in a Crowd”
(Greer) “Chloe” (Kahn), “Parting With You
(Conley). 11.55 a.m.: Vocal variations. 12 (midday):
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Kiss Me Earlier than the
Daybreak” (Perkins), “Angelia Mia” (Rappee). 12.7
nm • Interlude, Captain Donald M’Lean. 12.22
pim’: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Nebraska” (Sis-
silli) “Eternally Extra” (Burnett). 12.30 p.m.: Brit-
ish official wi-fi information; bulletins. 12.40
D.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces —“What Do I Care
What Anyone Stated” (Woods), “What a Child
(Whiting), “Anyone’s Loopy About You _ (Mur-
phy) “Get Out and Get Below the Moon. 12.50
Radi-o-Aces— “That’s My Weak spot . ow ‘Stept ,
“What a Child” (Whiting), “Beloved Me (Wilson).
I. n.m.: Vocal variations. 1.10 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell s
Radi’ o-Aces —“Why Haven’t We Obtained the Sunday
Each Day” (Summers), “Sticky Paws” (Abdrina),
“Chuckle, Clown, Chuckle” (Younger). 1.20 p.m.: Vocal
variations. 1.23 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
“By no means Earlier than, By no means Once more” (Chik), “You re in
Love I’m in Love” (Donaldson), “Adoree.” 1.30
p m.-’ Shut down. EVENING SECClON—(Announcer:
Frank Hatlierley.) 6 p.m.: Candy Solace from the
Seraphina. 7.50 p.m.: Outcomes of Check cricket,
England v. Bendigo, at Bendigo. NIGHT SESSION
—(Announcer, Frank Hatherley; accompanist, Reg.
Brown.) 8.Zero p.m.: Below the auspices of the
Well being Affiliation. T. J. Ryan wil communicate on “Oral
Hygiene.” 8.15 p.m.: E. A. Gollan, director of the
Y.M.C.A. Canoe Membership, affiliated with the Victorian
Canoe Affiliation, “Canoeing as a Sport and Re-
creation,” “Canoe Journeys Up the Yarra.” 8.30 p.m.:
The Station Orchestra—Fantasie, “Ein Soiree”
(Liszt), Veccio” (Sgambali). 9.45 p.m.: Violet
Jackson, soprano, “Cabbage Roses” (D. M’Geoch),
“The Dandelion” (D. M’Geochl. 8.52 p.m.: The
Station Orchestra, choice. 9.2 p.m.: The Solar-
downers’ Quartette, “Silver Threads Among the many
Gold,” “The Snider and the Fly.” 9.9 p.m.: The
Station Orchestra, choice, “Gioconda” (Ponchi-
ehii, “Allegretto, Op. 8” (Grieg). 9.24 p.m.: Rob-
ert Gillard, bass, “Asleep within the Deep” (Petrie)
“A Banjo Music” (Homer). 9.31 p.m.:. The Sta-
tion Orchestra, “Serefiade Lyric” (Elgar) “Sere-
nade Humoresque” (Elgar). 9.41 p.m • Violet
Jackson, soprano, “Cradle Music” (Schubert) “The
Violet” (Mozart). 9.48 p.m.: The Station Or-
chestra, fantasit, “Wunderklange” (Bizet) 950
p.m.: The Sundowners’ Quartette. “Souvenirs”
(Nicholls), “The Whisper Music” (Pal). 10.5
p.m.: The Station Orchestra, choice. “Manon”
(Massenet), “Allegretto,” Op. 164 (Schubert). 10.20
p.m.: “Age” nfews service, unique to 3AR; re-
sults ot Check cricket, England v. Bendigo, at Ben-
digo; acceptances for Saturday’s races at Epsom.
10.29 p.m.: Our Shakespearean Good-night Quota-
tion is from “King John”: “To gild refined gold,
to color the lily, to throw a fragrance on the vio-
let, to clean the ice, or add one other hue unto
the rainbow, or with taper mild to hunt the beau-
teous eye of heaven to garnish, is wasteful and
ridiculous extra.” 10.30 p.m.: God Save the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSION.—7.43 a.m.: Time sig-
nals. 7.45 a.m.: Information service. 8.Zero a.m.: Some
electrical data. 8.15 a.m.: Information service. 8.30
a.m.: Shut down. MORNING SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: Rita M‘Auliffe.l 11.Zero a.m.: Music. 11.5
a.m.’ Social information. 11.15 a.m.: Lecturette: A gar-
dening speak, by “Tecoma.” 11.30 a.m.: Music.
11. a.m.: Extra social information. 11.45 a.m.: Music.
1-2.Zero Midday: Shut down. MID-DAY SESSlON.—(An-
nouncer: R. Wight.) 1.Zero p.m.. Market studies
and climate info. 1.15 p.m.: From the
Ccnst-itutional Membership—A lunch-hour handle. 2.0
p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSION.—3.O
p.m.: A programme of electrically reproduced re-
cords. 3.30 p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances. 3.31
p.m.: From St. John’s Cathedral—A recital by
Mr George Sampson, F.R.C.O. (Metropolis Organist).
4.Zero p.m.: Afternoon information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSlON.—(Announcer: R.
Wight.) 6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; mail
info; delivery information. 6.5 p.m.: Dinner
music. 6.25 p.m.: Business bulletins.
6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, carried out by “The
Sandman.” 7.Zero p.m.: Information in short. 7.5 p.m.:
Inventory Trade information. 7.6 p.m.: Steel quotations.
7.7 p.m.: Market studies. 7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s
inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate info.
7.40 p.m.: Bulletins. 7.43 p.m.: Commonplace
time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lecturette: “A Discuss on
Books,” by Mr. J. Doyle iM’Leod’s). NIGHT
SESSION. —(Announcer: A. V. James.) 8.Zero p.m.:
Nationwide Anthem. The Choir—Refrain, “Land of
Hop’ and Glory’ (Elgar). J. L. Murray—“O,
Pretty Night time” (Landon Ronald). The Choir—•
Refrain, “The Heavens are Telling’ (Haydn). Vio-
let Clarke —“Come Unto Me” (Handel). Mrs. W.
J. Brett (elocutionist) —“What Grandmother Wore”
(Anon i. Mrs. Norman Bell (Rockhampton)—Se-
lected solo. The Choir —Refrain, “Come The place
My Love Lies Dreaming.” Jean Iredale and W. L.
Vocal duet, “Within the Springtime” (New-
ton). The Choir—Half music, “The Shadows O’er
the Valley Steal” (soloist, Mrs. H, W. Chapman).
The Choir —Refrain, “Viking’s Music” (Coleridge
Taylor). Norman Brandon (violinist)—“Hungarian
Dance No. 6” (Brahms). Bryth Evans—Solo, with
choral accompanied—“Ashgrove” (Welsh air). The
Choir —Number of Hymns: “Diadem” (Ellor);
“Maryton” (H. P. Smith); “Lux Eoi” (Sullivan);
“Inexperienced Hill” (Peace); “Bethsaida” (Bridge);
“Jazer” (Tozer): “Eventide” (Monk). 9.Zero p.m.;
Metropolitan climate forecast. 9.1 p.m.: Transfer-
ments of the Travelling Dental Clinic. Mrs. W. J.
Brett (elocutionist) —“Grandfather on the Loss of life
of Little Nell” (Dickens). D. W. Fraser —“Hat-
subject Bells” (Easthope Martin). The Choir—Half-
music, “Come Away, Candy Love.” Gwen Taylor—
“ Banks of Alan Water” (choral accompaniment).
The Choir —Anthem, “Thou Wilt Preserve Him in
Excellent Peace” (Williams). Mrs. H. Taylor—
“ Sleepy Hole Tune” (choral chorus). The Choir
—Anthem, “God is a Spirit” (Bennett). Mrs. Nor-
man Bell (of Rockhampton)—Chosen solo. The
Chrir—Refrain, ‘The Misplaced Chord” (Sullivan). Mrs.
W J. Brett (elocutionist) —“Plumstones” (Anon).
The Choir—Half-song, “Lullaby” (Williams). Nor-
man Brandon (violinist) —“Swung Music” (Ethel
Barns). The Choir —Half-song, “Sleep,, Mild
Woman” (Bishop). 10.Zero p.m.: The “Day by day Mail’
information: the “Courier” information; climate information. Shut
down.

G. C. Beardsmore Advert[edit]

SPECIAL
CLEARANCE
I’ve available a quantity
of equipment barely used,
that are lowered to a worth
of lower than half their ordinary
promoting determine.
Additionally available, a number of units
second-hand. Costs from £3.
Variable Condensers from
2/6.
Units rewired to newest circuit
at cheap worth.
Units electrified, and outcomes
assured.
G. C. Beardsmore,
38 MARTIN PLACE,
CITY
4th Flooring, Kincoppa! Chbrs.,
‘Telephones B 1773.
Sole Agent for Te-Ka-De Units
for N.S.W.

Stromberg Carlson Advert[edit]

mm,
m
Radio Set Voltmeter
Sample No. 135-B. Double studying;
two-incb instrument, having a scale of
0-7.5 volts for the “A” Battery studying,
and an 0-150 volt scale for the “B”
Battery studying.
Simply put in in any Radio Set.
Excessive voltage scale operated by small
push button at prime of instrument.
Completed in black enamel with silver
etched scale. An actual job.
Write , for
Radio Instrument Catalogue No. 15c.
STROMBERG CARLSON
Australasia Restricted.
76 William Avenue, Sydney.
‘Telephone: F 4184. Telegrams: “Strom.”

R. W. Patterson Advert[edit]

WHY NOT?
have a Set Constructed Specifically to Fit your
Native Situations if it Prices No Extra?
A SMALL DEPOSIT WILL PUT ONE
IN YOUR HOME.
We are going to make a set to fit your
locality, or to your personal specs,
for lower than it could price to purchase the
elements and make it your self—and on the
identical time you get knowledgeable job
lined with a twelve months’ guaran-
tee. Name or write for a quote, stating
your necessities, locality, and speci-
fications, and so forth.
SOME STANDARD MODELS.
5-Valve “Solodyne” Set, one or three
dial management, in polished maple cupboard.
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P.45 – Radio Data Service[edit]

The Wi-fi Weekly RADIO INFORMATION SERVICE Below the path of Ray Allsop and Don B. Knock (Affiliate Technical Editors).
Correspondence Answered solely by these Columns (See Coupon Under)

W.O. (Moree).— “I’m enclosing a listing of valves utilized in my receiver. May I enhance on them?” Reply: Sure, I feel you’ll discover the Philips six-volt valves would fit your goal.

“Ham” (Camberwell).— “I’ve simply obtained my AOPC and can be a lot obliged should you would reply the next questions by your column. How is the magnetic pick-up related within the transmitter? Can it work independently of the receiver? Utilizing a Colpitt’s circuit with a .0005 variable condenser for aerial tuning, what number of turns of wire would I want on the coils for the 200-250 metre band? Please let me know the diameter of the coils, and gauge of wire required. Is the loop system of modulation thought-about good? For my energy provide. I will use an Electrolytic Rectifier, with 600 volts both sides of the secondary tapping on the step-up tranny, and 12 jars for the rectifier. Would the answer be within the proportion of 2lb. of unusual borax to at least one gallon of distilled water? Would a financial institution of 50 candle-power lamps in collection with the mains be OK for forming? Would a 201A valve stand as much as 600 volts on the plate? Would the valves within the receiver be paralysed if I turned them on while the transmitter was operating? With 610
volts on a UX-210, what can be the enter? About 15-20 watts wouldn’t it? Reply: The magnetic pick-up must be plugged into the jack instead of the microphone. It’s going to work independently of the receiver. Wind 40 turns of 14-gauge naked copper wire on a 6in. diameter former. The loop system of modulation isn’t thought-about to be as environment friendly as different well-known strategies, resembling grid modulation, Heising modulation, and so forth. Make the answer pretty weak. With 600 volts on the plate of a 201A, it could flash over. Paralysed valves can be the results of having the receiver too close to the transmitter. The enter would rely on the milliamperage taken. If can be roughly 30 watts. Welcome to the “Ham” ranks O.M.

“Anxious” (Marrickville).— “I’ve constructed the Tremendous-Display-Grid-Peridyne, and can’t get it to oscillate.” Reply: Attempt completely different detector valves, and differ the “B” voltages. The receiver ought to oscillate simply. Maybe some part is at fault. Make sure valves are making good contact within the sockets.

F.A. (Wollongong).— “I’ve {an electrical} lighting plant in my neighborhood. Is there something I might do to cut back interference from this supply?” Reply: See the diagram printed in these columns. That is an interference eliminator. Wind 100 turns of 26 D.C.C. on a 3in. former. That is the radiofrequency choke. The condenser (which is fastened), has a capability of .0002 mfd. The aerial should be related on the junction of the choke and condenser. (Begin Graphic) Diagram of interference eliminator (Finish Graphic).

D.W.B. (Nelson, N.Z.).— “In reference to the article “Including a Stage of R.F. to the Browning Drake.” which appeared within the August “Radio,” will you kindly inform me if the 80 activates the detector coil is steady, or are the secondary (70 turns) and the response (14 turns) separate coils? The place ought to the secondary coil be tapped for neutralising functions?” Reply: The 2 coils are separate. For neutralising functions faucet on the centre of the secondary coil. Thanks in your sort remarks.

“Gasoline” (Willoughby).— “I’m enclosing sketch of my two-valve circuit, which till lately has been working very properly. I might at one time get inter-state stations on the loud speaker. Selectivity appears to be the difficulty, and the set is getting worse each
day. I’ve tried completely different plug-in coils with out success.” Reply: The grid-leak is defective. It’s fluctuating and altering. The plain treatment is to strive one other. Use coils of 25, 50, and 45 turns respectively for aerial, grid, and response.

F.P.Okay. (Eastwood).— “I’ve a three-valve receiver, and need to obtain London and different distant stations. At current I can obtain solely the native broadcasting stations. Will you please give me an adaptor circuit?” Reply: The circuit seems right here. The coils must be one of many short-wave coil kits put out by Radiokes of Lewcos — or another good make. The tuning condenser has a capability of .00025 mfd. Use an previous valve base, and solder the A plus, A minus, and plate results in the right terminals. With a purpose to discover out that are the right legs, maintain the valve base proper find yourself, with the pin towards you. The 2 rear terminals are the
filament connections, while the entrance leg is the plate. After soldering the versatile results in the right valve legs, replenish the cavity of the socket with sealing wax. Take away the detector valve out of your set, and place it within the shortwave adaptor. Tune with the condenser and the – variable resistances of 0-500,000 ohms. The choke could also be purchased or constructed at house. If constructed, wind 100
turns of 26 D.C.C. at random on a picket spool ½-in. in diameter with a ¼-in. core. (Begin Graphic) Diagram of shortwave adaptor (Finish Graphic).

J.G.L. (Lithgow).— “Would you publish in “Wi-fi Weekly” a short-wave adaptor for a four-valve receiver, mentioning elements required? I’m enclosing circuit of receiver.” Reply: See reply to F.P.Okay. above. In your case it is going to be essential to take away the R.F. valve in your four-valve receiver. The .002 condenser is totally essential.

E.F. (5 Dock).— “I’ve a five-valve set, with three dials, every numbering 0-100. I can obtain the N.S.W. stations, however I can not discover the right quantity on the dials for Melbourne, Adelaide, and Brisbane. I’d be grateful should you might inform me the numbers required to tune in these stations please.” Reply: It’s unimaginable to inform you this. The numbers differ with virtually each receiver. They rely on the capability and inductance of your coils, wiring, condensers, aerial, and so forth. Nonetheless, as a information, you’ll discover 3LO simply above 2BL, 3AR simply above 2FC, 4QG simply above 3LO, and 5CL simply above 4QG.

R.S.B. (Minto).— “I want to make a shortwave adaptor, and am questioning how you can mount the coils. Would a sub-panel be O.Okay.?” Reply: Sure, use a bakelite or ebonite sub-panel, with terminals mounted for the leads. It will be higher although, should you might rewind, or alter your coils in order that they might be used with Eco plugs and sockets. This protects many lengthy leads, and makes the coil system extra environment friendly.

P.M. (Newtown).— “I’ve a three-valve set. May I add one other valve to it with out altering the wiring? Are you able to inform me why I can not get Station 2UW plainly? I can get the remainder of the stations correctly.” Reply: You don’t enclose a circuit diagram,
nor do you inform us what circuit you’re utilizing. It will likely be essential so that you can advise us whether or not or not your receiver consists of a detector and two audios, or a stage of R.F., one detector, and one audio. If you’re utilizing a detector and two audios, I’d advise the addition of a stage of R.F. A slight alteration in wiring can be essential to the aerial and earth connections. In case your receiver is one consisting of a stage of R.F., a detector, and one audio, an additional stage of A.F. might be added. As you don’t inform us one thing about your receiver, we can not advise why you can’t obtain 2UW. Maybe the receiver itself is defective, or your set could also be inselective, or not tuning low sufficient. Maybe the aerial system is at fault. There could also be native screens. There are 100 explanations that is likely to be made with out realizing extra about your receiver. Write once more.

W.U. (Lue).— “I’ve a five-valve receiver (a Neutrodyne), made by David Jones. Wouldn’t it be attainable to insert an Osram Display Grid valve into this set? What must be the right size of aerial for finest outcomes? I’m utilizing a sure sort of bell-shaped loudspeaker. (Title talked about.) What do you consider this sort speaker? It doesn’t appear to deal with quantity too properly, particularly speech. What speaker do you suggest for a set of this sort? I have no idea something technically about wi-fi, however am very . Is
there any guide I might get to coach myself sufficient, as I wish to check out a few of the circuits showing in “Wi-fi Weekly.”
Reply: No, the S.G. valve can’t be inserted on this receiver, it could imply rebuilding. The proper size of aerial so that you can use is determined by native receiving circumstances, and you need to alter it accordingly. You will see the most effective size is between 50 and 100 ft. The receiver is much less selective when extra aerial is used. I’ve usually talked about that comparisons are odious, and for
apparent causes we can not evaluate one producer’s merchandise with one other. It’s possible you’ll use an Amplion Cone sort AC9 speaker for good outcomes. You’ll get good copy. “1001 Radio Questions and Solutions” (obtainable from Swain’s), can be a great funding.

W.J.R. (Leeton).— “I’ve a three-valve receiver which provides good outcomes, and of which I enclose a wiring sketch. I’d be very happy should you would reply the next questions. If I eliminated the entire of the coils, and substituted a brand new set, wound as follows, aerial 9, grid 15, response 11, utilizing 26-gauge wire on a 2½in. former, would the set then operate as a short-wave receiver?
In that case, on what waveband? Wouldn’t it be essential so as to add an additional variable condenser? What number of turns of 24 D.C.C. can be required on a grid coil wound on a 3in. former to allow me to hearken to the Marine band (600 metres)? I would really like to have the ability to eavesdrop on brief waves, however don’t want to go to the expense of constructing a separate set. Reply: The coil mixture talked about will tune from roughly 50-150 metres. No extra condensers can be required. From 75 to 80 turns can be essential for the 600 metre band.

QUERY COUPON
If you’re in difficulties about reception or set-construction, tell us, and we’ll endeavour to set, you proper. Make your questions transient to the purpose, and, the place attainable, present lay-out and wiring design. Certainly not will solutions to queries be
made by letter or by phone. All solutions will seem within the columns of this division within the order through which they’re acquired: The Radio Data Service, “WIRELESS WEEKLY.” Please reply the accompanying queries within the Data Service Division, at your earliest comfort. I enclose this coupon in an effort to point out that I’m a bona-fide reader.

A.P. (Bulli).— “will you please give me a circuit of a great easy wave-trap, as I expertise interference when tuning in 3LO.”
Reply: The circuit seems in these columns. Sadly it was disregarded final week, when your question was answered. Wind 100 turns of 24-gauge wire on a 2in. former, and faucet on the 70th, 80th, and 90th turns. Use a variable condenser of .00035 mfd., and join E to earth and A to aerial. The opposite two terminals are related to the receiver aerial and earth terminals as proven. (Begin Graphic) Diagram of wave-trap (Finish Graphic).

A.D.G. (Sydney).— “I discover in Queries columns that fuses could also be used within the receiver to cease the valves from being burnt out? I’m reasonably explicit about my “A” accumulator, which is an costly one. May I repair a fuse in some way to guard this battery? What beats me, is the truth that fuse wire has a really excessive resistance (so I learn lately), so will it not intervene with the operation of the receiver?” Reply: We’re publishing a diagram exhibiting you how you can defend your accumulator with a bit of fuse wire. Within the case of a short-circuit, the fuse wire would burn out, and the circuit can be damaged, thus saving the accumulator from injury. Fuse wire definitely has an amazing resistance, however the quantity of fuse wire utilized in fuses is so small as to be negligible. (Begin Graphic) Diagram of battery fuse (Finish Graphic).

W.H.C. (Bathurst): See above. In all probability there’s a brief on one of many battery leads, or there could also be a brief contained in the receiver. I feel you’ll discover the 2 leads shorting: are the B plus 45 volts and the B adverse of the final “B” battery? This might trigger the battery to warmth up, and generally little hills would type over the sealing wax protecting.

F.L. (Canberra): The circuit is appropriate. Attempt utilizing a Jackson condenser. They’re very strong, and can fit your necessities admirably.

M.T.R. (Cross Roads): In reply to your ’cellphone name! To the most effective of my information, feeding the loudspeaker with beer can be very unwise. It is best to use champagne; and I ought to have met your question in Radioantics columns!!

T.G.F. (Mosman): Your receipt has been forwarded. Remorse we have now no copies of the Marco 4. Many readers are asking for this circuit, which can most likely be printed once more within the close to future.

A.L. (Wollongong): One of the best straight one-valve set is a Reinartz.

D.A. (Campbelltown): The experimental license prices 20/. It’s essential to first sit for an examination. It will likely be essential to have a great information of strategies of radio communication by Morse, additionally elementary radio and electrical concept.

J.S. (Merewether).— “Please inform me if Radiokes Circloid coils can be utilized with display screen grid valves.” Reply: Sure, by tuned anode coupling.

Okay.D.F. Gulargambone.— “On my receiver (a Radiola straight six) I’ve picked up a number of instances on 56 of my dial studying a international station. I’ve not been in a position to perceive his name or language. He could be heard after 2BL closes down.” Reply: In instances like this it could be an amazing if readers gave us the approximate wavelength of the station by evaluating it with the tuning and
wavelength of stations recognized. You don’t point out the nights on which the transmissions had been acquired however because you point out 2BL — I feel the station can be one of many Japs — JOAK most likely, which can be discovered just under 2BL’s tuning. The Japs are coming in very properly recently. Dial readings differ with completely different receivers.

E.B. (Wellington).— “I constructed the display screen grid 4, printed in “Radio,” and discover the set works O.Okay. on dry batteries, however not with an eliminator. Ought to this be so. If not, the place might I ship the eliminator for overhaul? Reply: Sure, the receiver ought to work O.Okay. with the eliminator. Maybe you aren’t giving ample voltage to the display screen grid. Keep in mind that eliminators don’t but cater for this tapping. It will be advisable to take an extra lead off the amplifying faucet and insert a resistance to drop the
voltage down as required. Insert additionally an R.F. choke on this lead. If you’re happy that all the things is O.Okay., ship the eliminator to the makers or brokers for examination.

V.C.M. (Randwick).— “Why is it that after I deliver the sections of my gang condenser up right into a sure place with each other that the receiver begins squealing? I constructed the 1926 Solodyne. When the response condenser is positioned with its plates all out the set squeals, and doesn’t cease till the response condenser is moved about half-way in.” Reply: The whistle is prompted by resonance between the circuits. Attempt decreasing the “B” voltage on the R.F. levels, and insert R.F. chokes in B plus leads, so as to withstand R.F. from moving into the audio aspect of the receiver. Make sure the plates of the response condenser usually are not touching.

J.S.H. (Paddington).— “I want to construct a set for a good friend of mine dwelling 600 miles from right here — in Queensland. The set should embody simplicity of management and should be low-cost to construct. Something as much as a four-valve set can be passable. Loudspeaker outcomes on interstate stations is desired. Maybe you would suggest some circuit that has been printed in your paper.” Reply: Construct the Pentavox receiver, which has three valves, however offers outcomes equal to a five-valve receiver. Your sort needs are reciprocated.

P.45 – Radio Data Service (2)[edit]

“BELLBIRD” (N.5.W.).— “I’ve a battery-operated set with an unusual button-switch as lightning arrester on the lead-in. The earth wire comes from the water-pipe up by the ground to the dry battery. When the button is turned off the receiver will nonetheless give outcomes, although faintly. When a storm comes the swap ticks. Wouldn’t it be sensible to place a wire above the swap and join it direct to earth? Reply: Your proposal is unsafe. A lightning arrester must be used. Lightning takes the trail of least resistance to earth, however usually goes the longer approach spherical additionally. Use a D.P.D.T. swap and isolate the set. The explanation why you may nonetheless faintly hear stations when the swap is on is as a result of the one coil earthed is the first. The secondary coil acts as a pickup.

L.A. (Sydney).— “I discover a par. in queries relative to chargers. The par. says: “For much less bother the trickle charger would meet calls for. Nonetheless, should you want to maintain your battery in good order, it could advisable to make use of a charger.” I’m utilizing a Philips trickle charger together with a four-volt accumulator. Do I perceive {that a} trickle charger is detrimental to the battery?”
Reply: No the trickle charger isn’t detrimental, and it’ll all the time maintain the battery in full cost with out fuss or bother. The reply referred to — put ahead the purpose that it’s good to completely discharge and recharge the battery at instances, and this can be executed along with your trickle charger, although it can take barely longer than can be the case with a charger. Nonetheless, this must be no bother. Merely go away the trickle charger off for every week or so, then give the accumulator a great cost by way of the trickle charger — i.e., go away the trickle charger on slightly longer than you’d ordinarily.

“SCOTTY” (Newcastle).— “My boy desires a hi fi, so I instructed him to construct one himself. The one circuits I can discover show too costly, so are you able to give me a easy one-valve circuit utilizing one coil, one valve, and one tuning condenser?” Reply: The circuit is printed in these columns. The coil consists of 50 turns of 24-gauge D.C.C. wire, wound on a three-inch former. The grid-
leak must be made variable from 0 — about 5 ohms. This receiver could be made for lower than £2. The grid condenser has a capability of .00025 mfd., while the rheostat has a resistance of 30 ohms. One 45-volt “B” battery can be ample. (Begin Graphic) Diagram of straightforward one valve set (Finish Graphic).

“UARBRITE” (Uarbry).— “May a reasonably helpful newbie tinsmith presumably make an environment friendly dry “B” battery for radio work? If that is attainable, will you contemplate the query of giving detailed directions in an article in “W.W.” at an early date?” Reply: Typically talking, it’s not well worth the time put into it. Nonetheless, in a brand new collection commencing with the Christmas variety of “Wi-fi
Weekly,” entitled “Proving Radio,” I’ve given detailed directions for making your personal dry batteries. These batteries are to be used in experiments, however, could also be used as “A,” “B,” or “C” batteries. It will be a greater proposition to make moist “B” batteries. Directions for the constructing of those may even seem below the heading “Proving Radio.” (2) “Will you give a brief description in an early problem of “W.W.” on how you can rejuvenate a “B” battery. A reasonably clear description can be appreciated, as such a course of could be very helpful to nation radioists, for dry batteries usually are not obtainable at each nook, and dry batteries are liable to expire at unlikely and unreasonable instances. Even when the rejuvenated battery did responsibility for a couple of days it could be helpful.” Reply: Offering the process outlined right here is adopted earlier than the battery is past assist or enchancment your battery could also be rejuvenated. On checks I’ve personally carried out after rejuvenating “B” batteries with a studying of 20 volts (regular studying 45 volts) every battery after consideration gave roughly 5 weeks’ service. This was with intermittent use, after all. Peel off the outer protecting of cardboard and paper, and with a screwdriver or different implement scrape away the insulation protecting the cells, each on prime and beneath. With a 0-5 voltmeter take a studying of every separate cell. Preserve people who present any studying in any respect, even when solely a swing of the voltmeter needle. Throw away the useless cells. Now within the bottoms of every good cell pierce a gap. In a salammoniac electrolyte place these cells in order that the zinc casings are utterly lined. While they’re receiving therapy every cell must be related as much as the following, in collection. Solder rigorously, in any other case the high-quality connection wires might develop into damaged. Bind all of the cells along with some non-conductive materials after they’ve acquired therapy. Don’t forget to insulate every cell from its neighbour. If by any probability the sealing wax separating the cells has damaged away waxed paper could also be used. Solder up the bottoms of the cells after the therapy. On taking a studying with a “B” voltmeter you’ll discover that every cell is giving its most 1½ volts.

L.E.S. (Marrickville).— “I’ve constructed a three-valve Reinartz. If loudly adjusted there’s a excessive squeal or whistle.” Reply: It appears you’re utilizing an excessive amount of response. Nonetheless, concentrate additionally to grid bias on the audio valves. Maybe the valves you’re utilizing usually are not appropriate.

W.B.M. (Kogarah).— “I’ve a three-valve Reinartz. When my accumulator is totally charged the hand capability is nil, however when discharged hand capability elevated significantly. A howl additionally develops when the response and tuning condensers are 20 levels aside. I’m utilizing a loop aerial. The coils had been wound on my own — aerial 9 turns, filament 45 turns, response 25 turns.” Reply: The whistle might be on account of a defective or useless “B” battery. Use a single wire aerial 50 ft lengthy. In case your tuning condensers are of .0025 (or .00035) for response and .0005 for grid tuning, your coils are flawed. On a 3½-inch former you need to wind 45 turns for the secondary and 20 turns for the response. Use 24-gauge D.C.C. wire. Area these two coils quarter of an inch. The aerial coil must be wound on an analogous former, and may include 25 turns of the identical gauge wire.

H.G. (Blacktown).— “Is it attainable to obtain another station than 2FC on the crystal receiver printed in “W.W.” 24th June, 1927? I’m dwelling 5 miles from Pennant Hills and 20 miles from Coogee.” Reply: You’re too close to to 2FC’s transmitter to
count on a crystal receiver to select up another station. The circuit is selective, nonetheless. You could possibly hear 2BL, however you could hear 2FC additionally while listening to the previous station. (2) With regard to the three-coil regenerative circuit, through which the output of the valve is fed again into the grid circuit. I’ve been instructed that the usage of the response coil within the getting of distant stations is the same as a stage of R.F. earlier than the detector valve. Would you say that that is so?” Reply: Hardly so, although response offers a great share of this high quality it can’t be equalled to the outcomes given by an R.F. valve. Attempt it for your self. Response could be very helpful on native stations additionally, however R.F. is ineffective on this respect.

R.H.W. (Bondi).— “Will you please inform me how I can reduce out 2GB and get 2FC? The circuit of my crystal receiver is enclosed.”
Reply: Construct the wave-trap showing in these columns. 100 turns 24-gauge D.C.C. on a two-inch former, and faucet on the 70th, 80th, and 90th turns. Use a variable condenser of .00035 mfd.

A.S. (Lidcombe).— “I’d deem it an amazing favour should you would ship me the circuit for the “Marco 4,” as I want to rework my set throughout Christmas. I’ve lent my circuit so usually that I’ve now misplaced hint of it. Up to now I’ve not heard a four-valver to equal the Marco 4 for pure tone with quantity. I belief you’ll be able to oblige with such a long-distance again quantity.” Reply: Inside a couple of days of publication of this receiver (Nov. 4th, 1927) all copies however that stored for reference had been offered out. Nonetheless, as I, have had so many inquiries for this circuit it’s reproduced in these columns. We will be happy to produce any info required. (Begin Graphic Caption) The long-awaited circuit of the Marco 4 Receiver — one of the crucial fashionable of the “Wi-fi Weekly” receivers. (Finish Graphic Caption)

GENERAL.— It’s only pure that a couple of queries ought to come handy from readers asking why they can’t hear experimental station VK-2NO at current. The reply is straightforward. Mr. Knock has briefly dismantled his station, and is re-erecting it on the handle of VK-2AW. The 2 stations can be housed within the one transmitting room, and between them will cowl each section of experimental transmission. At the least a month Will elapse earlier than VK-2NO is able to resume his experimental ‘cellphone transmissions, which happen on wave-lengths various from 160 to 220 metres. The equipment can be significantly improved, significantly with regard
to modulation.

P.45 – Radio Data Service (3)[edit]

BRIEF REPLIES.

G.W. (Narrandera).— Construct the Marco 4. The circuit is being reproduced if attainable on this problem — look by the question columns. If it doesn’t seem right here you’ll discover it subsequent week.

R.S. (Glebe).— (1) The Marco 4 receiver consists of a three-valve Reinartz receiver with a stage of radio-frequency added. (2) No, the Marco 4 has not but been tailored to the screen-grid. It will most likely be executed later. (3) The screen-grid has the facility to amplify R.F. indicators in a fashion that isn’t attainable with the unusual three electrode valves. (4) Sure, the receiver might be made into a transportable receiver. (5) Circuits in latest points will fit your necessities.

L.D. (Newcastle).— Sorry we have now no copies left of the problem you require. Would you want one other circuit? You could possibly not do higher than construct the Marco 4. See additionally beneath.

GENERAL.— Mr. L. D. ; of 43 Maitland Avenue, Stockton, Newcastle, wish to pay money for a replica of “W.W.,” Could 27th, 1927. Can any reader oblige?
A.G. (Mt. Como).— You’ll require rheostats of 30 ohm resistance every. If desired to work all valves from the one rheostat a 6 ohm resistance can be essential.
G.R.H. (England).—Glad you want our paper. The explanation why Morse code isn’t made up systematically — resembling dot for A, dot dot for B, and so forth — is as a result of sure letters within the English language are repeated so usually within the spelling of a phrase that it was thought-about advisable by Morse (who made the code) to make these recurring letters as easy and as brief as attainable. Thus A is merely dot sprint, I is dot, dot. E is dot, T is sprint, and so forth. No, S.O.S. doesn’t signify any phrases, resembling “Save Our Souls.” The three letters had been chosen as a result of they’re simply remembered and are very brief to ship. The three letters are additionally rhythmical,
and one’s consideration is definitely arrested when listening to the three dots, adopted by three dashes, and three extra dots.

Okay.F. (Camden).— A whole listing of the brand new radio letter indicators will seem within the December problem of “Radio.”

W.R.D. (Wooloowin).— The circuit submitted is appropriate, except for the C optimistic connection, which ought to go to A adverse, and never A optimistic, as proven.

T.F.G. (Lithgow).— Construct the “Go-Getter” shortwave receiver.

U.R.T. (Bronte).— The secondary tuning coil of most receivers is tuned with a .0005 variable condenser. If you’re making up your personal circuit you will want to seek out the correct quantity of turns, however you’ll discover it’s roughly 50 activates a 3-inch former.

A.L. (5 Dock).— The next is a listing of the final goal valves within the Philips’ line. One-volt filament collection, A109; two-volt, A209; (the three-volt varieties at the moment are out of date); four-volt, A409; six-volt, A609.

T.F.T. (Botany).— The A.O.P.C. course will seem in “W.W.” shortly. It’s going to comply with a collection of articles main as much as the course.

A.M.A. (Queensland).— Your supposition is appropriate. The image resembling a backyard rake is the earth. It’s an previous American concept.

P.46 – Mullard Advert[edit]

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P.47 – C.A. Holmes and Co Advert[edit]

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9/6 weekly.
A written assure
with each set.
Demonstrations in your
house don’t place you
below any obligation.
Our prospects are our
pals. We try to
please.
We promote elements on
phrases, additionally.
C. A. Holmes and Co.,
515 George .Avenue, Sydney
’Telephone M 3903

2GB Programme
Thursday, January 10.
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness speak
by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music. 10.30
a.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss Helen J.
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2C p.m.:
Music. 2.5 p.m.: Ladies’s radio service,
by Mrs. /Dorothy Jordan; Pat Hansen,
sports activities speak. 2.50 p.m.: Music. 3.Zero p.m.:
Discuss. 3.15 p.m.: Shut down. 5.30 p.m.:
Kids’s session, by Uncle George. 7.0
p.m.: Inventory and market studies, by New
Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Company, Ltd.
7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: Cornet solos,
by Mr. Phil Conchman. 8.10 p.m.: by
Mr. Clement Hosking. 8.20 p.m.: Violin
solos by Mr. Lionel Hargreaves. 8.30 p.m.:
Mr. Jack Win and Miss Nora Windle in
authentic alternatives from their in depth
repertoire. 8.40 p.m.: Pianoforte solos by
Miss Belle Yong. 8.50 p.m.: Songs by
Madame Bennett North. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate
report. 9.Three p.m.: Handle. 9.15 p.m.. Cor-
internet solos by Mr. Phil Conchman. 9.25 p.m.:
Songs by Mr. Clement Hosking. 935 p.m.:
A humorous interlude. 9.40 ,p.m Violin
solos by Mr. Lionel Hargreaves. 9.50 pm.:
Songs by Madame Bennett North 10.0
p.m.: Mr. Jack Win and Miss Nora Windle.
10.10 p.m.: Orchestral music. 10.30 p.m.:
Shut down.
Friday, January 11.
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness speak
by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music 10.30
a.m.: Ladies’s session, by Miss Helen J.
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.Zero p.m.:
Music. 2.5 p.m.: Ladies’s radio service,
by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m : Music.
3.Zero p.m.: Discuss. 3.15 p.m.: Shut down. 5.30
p.m.: Kids’s session, by Uncle George.
7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market studies, by New
Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Company, Ltd.
7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: 2GB Instru-
psychological Trio; Miss Ada Brook, Mr Cecil
Berry, Mr. Cedric Ashton. 8.15 p.m.: Songs
The Wiring Diagram of th ; Wasp Receiver, described by Ray Allsop within the final tssue
by Miss Nance Marley. 8.15 p.m.: A
humorous interlude by Mr. Jack Wm and
Mr. Heath Burdock. 8.30 p.m.: ’Cello solos
by Mr. Cedric Ashton. 8.40 p.m.: Songs by
Signor Mario Gustimo. 8.50 p.m.: Piano-
forte solos by Miss Ada Brook. 9.Zero p.m.:
Climate report. 9.Three p.m.: Handle. 9.15
p.m.: Songs by Miss Nance Marley. 9.25
p.m.: 2GB Instrumental Trio. 9.40 p.m.:
A humorous interlude. 9.45 p.m.: Songs by
Signor Mario Gustimo. 9.55 p.m.: Violin
solos by Mr. Cecil Berry. 10.5 p.m.: Orches-
tral music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down.
Tobacco Tradition
|N view of the truth that the tobacco-grow-
ing trade guarantees to develop into of nice
significance in Australia the speak given from
SLO on January 9 by T. A. J. Smith on
“Tobacco Rising” ought to command the at-
tention of a large circle.of listeners. The
many younger males who’re migrating to the
nation as of late with a view to taking on
the worthwhile tradition of “My Woman Nicotine”
ought to have the ability to glean a lot beneficial infor-
mation from this speak, as Mr. Smith is the
foremost skilled in Australia on this topic.

Inside Again Cowl – Amalgamated Wi-fi (A/asia) Advert[edit]

A.W.A. IDEAL TRANS-
FORMER. Made in 5 ratios,
t to 1 (particular output), 2 to
1. 3-| to 1, 5 to 1 and 9 to 1.
A.W.A. N O N-M ICRO-
PHONIC VALVE
SOCKET. Out there in
assembled and unassembled.
Appropriate for all UX base
valves.
aHrt |C
Made in 4 capacities
Worth 14/6
.0005 (23 plates)
.0001 ( 7 plates) )
.00025 (13 plates; 5
i .00035 (17 plates) »
Worth 13/6
&
‘V
A. W. A. Logarithmic Condensers are designed on the central line prin-
ciple. This, mixed with their sq. regulation traits renders tuning
extraordinarily selective. Hole spindle makes provision for clockwise and
anti-clockwise motion, along with gang operation if required. Absolute
minimal of insulating materials —basically low loss.
Silver-plated all through, giving enticing look.
e 1
( AusfraTasia)jCfa.
Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and
Wellington, N.Z.
ess
OBTAINABLE FROM ALL RADIO DEALERS

Again Cowl – Amplion Advert[edit]

° aatRY
6°>wheim
WIRELE// /ET/
The Amplion Garboncel dif-
fers from an accumulator in
that no electrical energy is
required for re-charging.
Virtually no consideration is
required and your hi fi
won’t ever be out of motion as
far as “A” battery is con-
cerned.
m
iii
irnniiiiitiiiiiiiiiui
V
‘a*«ltA*,Twv t »a t r
SMPLIOii
c %on
n»f *
SyW
No. 229 – 32/6
The chemical used is a straightforward
innocent salt. The required
amount is merely dissolved in
water, poured into the Gar-
boncel, which is then prepared
to be used. Such a cell will give
as much as 12 months’ service with-
out additional charging. The
Amplion is the one major
battery which can successfully
substitute an accumulator.
“A” Battery Troubles
Eradicated.
/MPIION.
CArbonc£l
Chemically Generates
Its Personal Electrical Present.
NO
Electrical Energy Needed
Acids
Fumes
Odor
I
p
fA/sia) Ltd.
Bradbury Home, 53-55 York St.,
SYDNEY
• AT
Jo v
V’
/

  1. John William Robinson (Four January 1929), “Spiritual Broadcasting”, Wi-fi Weekly (Australia) (Sydney: Wi-fi Newspapers Restricted) 13 (02): 5-6, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-723974474, retrieved 26 July 2020, “Survey of non secular broadcasting all over the world.”. 
  2. Donald Brader Knock (Four January 1929), “The New 12 months Present Three”, Wi-fi Weekly (Australia) (Sydney: Wi-fi Newspapers Restricted) 13 (02): 9-10, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-723974636, retrieved 26 July 2020, “A cost-effective receiver from previous spare elements.”. 
  3. Donald Brader Knock (Four January 1929), “The Air Scout Receiver”, Wi-fi Weekly (Australia) (Sydney: Wi-fi Newspapers Restricted) 13 (02): 15-18, http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-723974886, retrieved 26 July 2020, “An All-Electrical Receiver for Residence Development”. 

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