History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Publications/Wireless Weekly/Issues/1929 01 11

Hyperlink to Concern PDF[edit]

WorldRadioHistory.com’s scan of Australasian Radio World – Vol. 01 No. 04 – August 1936 has been utilised to create the partial content material for this web page and could be downloaded at this hyperlink to additional lengthen the content material and allow additional textual content correction of this subject: ARW 1936 08

Generally, solely content material which is required for different articles on this Wikibook has been entered right here and textual content corrected. The fabric has been extensively used, inter alia, for compilation of biographical articles, radio membership articles and station articles.

Entrance Web page[edit]

Wi-fi Weekly 3d.

Incorporating “Radio in Australia & New Zealand”

VOL. 13, NO. 3 – FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1929

(Registered on the G.P.O., Sydney for transmission by publish as a newspaper).

Ray Allsop and Don. B. Knock Technical Editors

Featured articles: Disruption of Atom might Revolutionise World; The Tremendous Display-Grid Peridyne

Cowl Photograph: Man in armchair asking boy to be quiet

Commercial: Philips Loud Audio system

Inside Entrance Cowl – Fox & MacGillycuddy Advert[edit]

C MAX
The Battery Scientifically Produced by a New and Higher Course of !
S CIENTIFIC analysis has revealed the essential proven fact that acids and
Sal-ammoniac (largely utilized in atypical Excessive Rigidity Radio Batteries)
decompose the Zinc Electrodes, inflicting a lot of the battery bother the
person has to cope with.
The “Climax” formulation doesn’t embrace both of those chemical compounds.
“Climax” is made by a completely new technique which ensures excellent
operation over each interval of an extended and helpful life.
Noise and unsteady operation want by no means be reckoned with in case your set
is “Climax” geared up! .
Undoubtedly, the “Climax” in battery making has been reached on this
new-process-product, so aptly named.
CLIMAX B BATTERIES
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P.01 – Metropolitan Electrical Advert[edit]

“The Best Receiver but launched,” says Technical Editor
THIS SET IS
Radiokes Peridyne
Tailored for Display-Grid Operation

H
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P.02 – Harringtons Advert[edit]

%! SECRET
gfQUALITi^
Transformers are designed to-day alongside the identical strains as
have been employed years in the past, when amplifier voltages ran as much as
solely 45, or maybe 90, volts, and but an virtually imperceptible
PILOT
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The Water Jug Take a look at
Pilot engineers have modified utterly from typical
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SUCH PROTECTION AGAINST MOISTURE ABSOLUTELY
PREVENTS INSULATION BREAKDOWN AT ALL VOL-
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Sole Australasian Brokers:
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Retail Radio Dept,
and Showroom:
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We now have lengthy maintained a particular
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Please add postage and trade when
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P.03 – Wi-fi Weekly Banner[edit]

Wi-fi Weekly – Vol. 13, No. 3. – Friday, January 11, 1929.

Incorporating Radio in Australia & New Zealand

Deal with: 51 Castlereagh St., Sydney. ‘Telephones: B7148-9.

Behind Your Radio Receiver

Vacuum-tube Experiments Presage Mastery of Components . . .

Disruption of the Atom Could Revolutionise World

Over 5,000,000 volts — the best electrical potential ever produced by man — has been achieved within the laboratory of two American scientists, Breit and Tuve. They succeeded in making use of a voltage of one million volts to a vacuum tube geared up with electrodes outdoors the exhausted glass bulb. That is the best voltage ever impressed upon a vacuum tube. This doesn’t sound very spectacular to the layman, however it signifies that we’re promised, by the event of those highly effective scientific instruments, the disintegration of the weather into their constructing blocks of optimistic and unfavorable electrical energy, probing of the structure of the nucleus or mysterious coronary heart of the atom and different such basic achievements in finding out the structure of matter. Sitting comfortably listening to the radio programmes, we’re oft, if we give it some thought in any respect, to imagine that broadcasting is the final word achievement of bodily science. However that is patently flawed. Radio broadcasting is barely a small triumph in a minor department of radio lively science. On this huge discipline it occupies an insignificant place within the eyes of scientists. Their consideration is
directed to the quickly approaching time after we will likely be in lots of respects masters of the weather. A supply of high-speed projectiles, each electrons and atoms, extra highly effective than the radiation from radium, whose irresistible and pure disintegration now provides essentially the most highly effective minute bullets identified to science, will likely be supplied by the utilisation of the excessive voltages now developed. The equipment working on 60 cycle present, sparking 120 instances a second, will give out a stream of electrons that it might require two kilos of radium to supply. Over a kilowatt of energy on the voltage of 5,000,000 could be emitted with the equipment. Comparatively little house is required in an effort to home the equipment obligatory to supply the 5,000,000 volts. An X-ray machine similar to utilized in medical follow supplies present
at about 50,000 volts, which is fed into and costs a big condenser constructed from window glass and lead foil. This condenser discharges abruptly and spectacularly by a spark hole right into a small inductance coil which is coupled with a Tesla coil, a yard lengthy, three inches in diameter, and wound with 7000 turns of superb wire. That is the coil during which the 5,000,000 volts is produced. To insulate the wire on the Tesla coil it’s immersed in a big tank of transformer oil, beneath stress of 500 kilos per sq. inch. Preliminary experiments confirmed that the oil in an open tank beneath atypical atmospheric stress would insulate the coil sufficiently nicely for 3,000,000 volts. Dr. Breit is assured that even larger voltages could be obtained through the use of bigger Tesla coils, however for the final yr he has been
occupied with the issue of making use of to hoover tubes the excessive voltages already obtained. “5 million volts, when utilized to doubly charged helium atoms, or significantly to alpha particles, or, nonetheless higher, to multiply charged ions or stripped atoms, needs to be able to giving particles with vitality a lot in extra of the swiftest alpha particles thus far noticed,” Dr. Breit declared in his scientific report. With a purpose to use the excessive voltages it’s essential to get them inside an air-free tube during which the steel to be disintegrated or the substance to be in any other case affected could be positioned. Atypical vacuum tubes with electrodes inside won’t stand voltages of greater than about 300,000. The event of the skin electrode tube, into which, by the glass, one million volts could be positioned, is a vital step towards making use of the excessive voltages in disintegration experiments.

Transmutation of Metals and Artificial Meals could also be Attainable

The importance of those new achievements could be appreciated when it’s realised that one of many ends towards which scientists have been striving is a profitable assault on the nucleus of the atom. The atom consists of a centre surrounded by whirling electrons. It is sort of a minute photo voltaic system during which, the nucleus is the solar and the electrons are planets. Sweeping off the electrons is straightforward, however the penetration and disintegration of the small, comparatively heavy nucleus are tougher. Sir Ernest Rutherford, the British physicist, by bombardment with alpha particles from radium, has knocked hydrogen out of lightweight components, similar to sodium, potassium, and many others., and thus proved transmutation of components doable. What’s now wanted is heavier artillery, and that’s the object of Dr. Breit’s work. Electrons similar to given off from any electrical mild filament are immensly sped up by excessive voltage present, however they’re mild in weight. Extra “beef” is required, so alpha particles, that are dashing helium atoms, are projected in opposition to the nucleus being besieged. When given off from radium these alpha particles are already transferring on the velocity that will be imparted by some 3,800,000 volts. The Carnegie Establishment physicists intend ultimately to present them one other increase with 5,000,000 or extra volts and procure a extra highly effective bombardment than radium can produce. Even speedier and weightier projectiles will likely be obtained by equally boosting the dashing naked hearts of atoms from which the electrons have been stripped. By growing in measurement the current equipment, and by feeding the voltages from one tube into one other, it might be doable to acquire in future years voltages of many instances the 5,000,000 now achieved. When 30,000,000 voltages are produced and utilized a number of the moot questions in physics will most likely be settled. Theoretically it might be not possible to have radiation at this excessive voltage, for the reason that electron can be damped and all wave lengths would turn out to be one. That is additionally the voltage concerned within the creation of the helium atom out of 4 hydrogen atoms, which Dr. Robert Andrews Millikan believes provides rise to the highly effective cosmic rays that bombard the earth from outer house. The very best voltage produced earlier than Dr. Breit’s work was 3,600,000, obtained by the Basic Electrical Firm at Pittsfield, Mass., by the usage of its so-called synthetic lightning equipment. The very best voltage heretofore obtained inside a vacuum tube was the 900,000 volts throughout the cascaded three-in-one cathode ray tubes of Dr. W. D. Coolidge, of the Basic Electrical Firm. It’s fascinating to take a position on the outcomes of the disintegration of the atom. With atomic construction in our management we’d be capable to remodel one aspect into one other. It could be merely a query of dislodging electrons from the atomic nucleus. The actual fact that transmutation of components can be doable is in no way the best impact of such an achievement of science. Because the early days of man there have been males who’ve tried to alter one aspect into one other. Historical folklore is stuffed with the tales of the alchemists, these mysterious beings of the Center Ages, half-wizard, half-chemist, who experimented with the baser components in useless effort to alter them into gold.

(Begin Photograph Caption) Edison and Steinmetz within the former’s laboratory. (Finish Photograph Caption)

(Begin Photograph Caption) Scientists might harness this power. (Finish Photograph Caption)

This could, in fact, be doable. Consider its impact. Gold is the usual of the world by which wealth is measured. There would not be such a factor as wealth as we recognise it now. The phrases “wealthy” and “poor” would lose their significance. Not would it not be essential to carry out handbook labour. All of our foodstuffs would turn out to be artificial, as would our fuels. Wastage can be totally eradicated. This could be true as a result of the atomic development may very well be modified in order to rework this waste matter into helpful meals, clothes, or sources of vitality. Talking of vitality, atypical physics educate us that if one have been capable of summary the
vitality contained in a glass of water it might provide sufficient energy to drive a liner from London to Sydney, and all that will be essential to drive it again once more can be to take an atypical soda straw, immerse it on this similar glass of water, and blow on it for a second. Dr. Williams, one other well-known physicist, has stated that one might get all method of meals from the identical glass of water or their equal in caloric energy. One of many difficulties of utilizing super energy of this nature can be within the design and growth of a system of carburetion as we all know it in an vehicle — that’s, a management which might allow us to make use of this vitality with out catastrophe to ourselves. All of us are conversant in the latent vitality of dynamite. Within the case of explosions, the vitality is abruptly launched. No technique has but been discovered which might allow man to launch it slowly and in ample energy to be of service. An atypical lump of clay would put the current energy of dynamite to disgrace. Society as we all know it to-day can be destroyed. Since it’s largely depending on wealth, some new customary of valuation must be discovered. This can be very troublesome to take a position simply what this might be. Actually it couldn’t be jewels, as a result of they may very well be made synthetically, like gold. There can be no such factor as hunger. Nonetheless, as in every thing else in nature, there’s a “joker” hidden someplace. We’re confronted with the immutable legal guidelines of compensation or stability. There can be egocentric individuals who would benefit from the state of affairs to additional their very own pursuits, and the facility of transmutation of components of their arms would turn out to be a veritable Frankenstein monster which could ultimately destroy the earth. Any single particular person who alone possessed this energy might management the world with extra omnipotence than any group of emperors within the historical past of the earth. Probably the most fanciful concepts of fervid imaginations is likely to be poor compared with the realities that will exist in such an age. Velocity and time would lose their significance. The human thoughts would bear huge adjustments; our processes of pondering would
be significantly altered to deal with the brand new requirements, conditions, and beliefs. Over the centuries throughout which science has been developed there have been many
mysterious catastrophes which have remained unexplained. There have been others as a result of what has been termed spontaneous combustion. That the atom is being damaged down every day isn’t any secret. We see it within the photo voltaic system. To that is attributed life itself. It seems that science just isn’t very removed from the invention of a few of nature’s innermost secrets and techniques. Who is aware of however that she might, on the very eve of their discovery, put an finish to man’s efforts on this regard by some holocaust which could wipe out the entire of mankind!

P.04 – Between You and Me and the Microphone[edit]

BETWEEN YOU AND ME AND THE MICROPHONE

The “Three Smart ” Man
M R CHARLES LAWRENCE handed us
an unofficial snort the opposite evening.
We stated “We loved the Nativity Play, Mr.
Lawrence. What number of components did you’re taking?”
“4,” he stated. “I used to be the shepherd and
—er—the three sensible males. What the satan
are you laughing at?”
For Outdated Acquaintance
CORRESPONDENT to 2FC requested
whether or not John Mitchell was the person
who sang “Residence,
Candy Residence,” in
Dubbo about 1915?
Artists often re-
ceive such letters. Miss
Mabel Batchelor was
specifically requested to
sing “Alice Blue
Robe” by a resident
within the far west, as she
was positive Miss Batche-
lor had sung it in her
city 5 years in the past;
she recognised the
voice!
The Good day Man Televised
QN New 12 months’s Eve it was determined by the
New South Wales Broadcasting Coip-
pany to broadcast {a photograph} of
2FC’s announcer, Mr. A. S. Cochrane.
He was to be “televised” ingesting a cup of
espresso. We noticed it achieved by the con-
trol room home windows. Mr. Cochrane stood in
entrance of the microphone, in the midst of a
group of excited radio engineers. “Mr. Coch-
rane will now drink his espresso” it was an-
nounced. Mr. Cochrane drank audibly, with
sibilant help from the group. There
have been every kind of sounds from tin whistles
and toy trumpets; and Mr. Ailsop introduced,
“Mr. Cochrane will now substitute his cup on
the saucer.” Mr. Cochrane obliged—as far
because the listeners have been involved. However the
tv transmitter will need to have been shut
off rapidly, as a result of we nave had no studies
of the finale; Mr. Cochrane changed his cup
on the saucer and—cup and saucer fell on
to the studio carpet and smashed into so
many items that they have been extraordinarily onerous
to select up once more.
Track of the Soul
of the artists who sing jazz melo-
dies within the studios have a behavior of
swaying and wobbling whereas they sing. This
behavior aggravated a sure accompanist, who
thus reprimanded the
wobbler: “My expensive
lady, you MUST cease
that wobbling,” he
stated: “The track just isn’t
THERE” (giving her a
mild slap) “however in
your head.” But one-
doubts whether or not Jazz-
sans-Wobble is pos-
sible. One other behavior
of the jazz singer is
to wrinkle the face
into every kind of cheer-
ful shapes. Eyebrows
go up expressively,
eyes roll dolefully to
the ceiling, and smiles—typically grim and
horrible, typically most charming and de-
sirable-waste themselves on the microphone.
A Prince Broadcast
ROYALTY was heard on the air, by way of the
short-waves, on December 28. ANE,
Java, broadcast an deal with by the Prince
and Princess Astrid, of Sweden, who’re
visiting the East.
Good Sir Knight
OFFICIALS of 2FC have been very a lot aston-
ished when an artist who had been
broadcasting from their studio despatched them
a Christmas card, signed together with his actual title.
The signature was: “Main Sir Howard Sey-
mour, Okay. 8.5.”
The Bare Fact
]j[H- HARRY GRAHAM was talking on
Fashions. “It’d be wonderful to be a
woman in summer time,” he said. “There’s
no doubt they have it all over us, so far
as clothes go.” “Doubtless because,” re-
marked a cynic in the corner, “they haven’t
got much over themselves.”
Scottish Greetings
pNCLE BAS, of 2BL, received these charm-
ing Scottish New Year verses from
little May Gowans, of Thirrouli—
Auld frien’s as noo the year is endin’
Some lucky heather here I’m sendin’;
Ma he’rty Yuletide greetin’s gang wi’t;
An a’ guid wishes tak’ along wi’t;
May you an’ Fortune aye gang cleekin’,
An’ lang yer lum keep briskly reekin’.
Wishing ye a’ a rale Happy New Year;
an’ that ilka day in the New Year may
be better than the last.
Uncle Bas repeated these verses, which
cam’ wi’ a sprig o’ heather an’ a large
round o’ shortbread, with perfect artistic
effect. But we had to ask him the meaning
of the last couplet, which, freely translated is
“May you and Fortune go together; and
long may your Chimney keep briskly smok-
ing.” At least, Uncle Bas says so.
Lord Birkenhead
POLITICAL interest has been aroused by
Lord Birkenhead’s plans for the future,
one report being that he is expected to
receive one of the most important posts in
the Imperial Cable and Wireless merger,
the chairmanship of the 265,000,000 dollar
Imperial communications combine.
We Apologise
QF course, it would be better and wiser
to leave it out—but! In a certain
studio in Sydney the
request, during the
children’s session, was
for a song—“ Little
Mister Baggy Britches.”
The announcer turned
to the little girl who
usually sings this song.
“Well, now, have you
got ‘Baggy Britches’
to-night?” he asked.
As the control room
operator afterwards re-
marked, “Rather a
bloomer, what?’-’
Fly Paper
ONE0 NE who has seen a great number of the
letters received by the New South Wales
Broadcasting Company from listeners-in
throughout the world, assures us that he has
not yet seen a specimen of American or
Canadian handwriting which did not re-
semble a fly’s passage across the paper. Of
course, this may not be characteristic of jU
American writing. At any rate, it is typical
of our friends over the pond that they dis-
regard flourishes, and the Broadcasting Com-
pany must be very pleased with some of their
congratulatory remarks.
Another for Mr. Lawrence
K WELL-KNOWN broadcasting artist had
been engaged to perform at a dinner
given to a great man. He resolved to give
the best performance of his life, and went
without his lunch to make sure. Moreover,
he refused to take anything at all of the
dinner itself- Mr. Lawrence, who is a/ con-
noisseur in these matters, says that the spread
was the finest he has ever seen. So you
will have a clear picture of an exceptionally
hungry broadcasting artist, suffering for the
sake of Art. As soon as the dinner was
over, the chairman
announced that, as
his Excellency had
many pressing duties,
he would be pleased
if the company
would excuse him.
The company broke
up; and the unfor-
tunate artist . went
home, sans perform-
ance and sans din-
ner. Mr. Lawrence
says that he has
never been known
since then to go
without his dinner.
BY REQUEST
I’ve listened-in to 2BL.
I’ve listened-in to 2FC
I’m sure I’ve always tuned in ‘well,
But one thing’s always puzzled me —
I’ve listened-in to Adelaide,
To Perth, and also Maoriland;
But one thing’s left me in the shade —
There’s one thing I can’t under-
stand —
I’ve listened-in to 3LO,
I’ve listened in to JjQG —
There’s just one thing I’d like to
know —
Perhaps you will explain to me.
Yes; one thing brings the puzzled
frown,
So tell me now, and be a sport—
WHEN■ STATIONS SAY THEY’RE
CLOSING DOWN,
IS THIS TO CATCH THEIR
TRAINS OF THOUGHT?
DEKIT.

P.05 – Problems of Broadcasting[edit]

Issues of Broadcasting
With every years advance the difficulties which beset broadcasters turn out to be extra
intricate. On this article the well-known Chief Engineer of the British Broad-
casting Company reveals how the broadcasting issues have giown through the
final decade, and enumerates crucial of these that are puzzling the
authorities to-day. He contrasts British and American strategies and states the
44 energy” drawback in full.
By CAPT. P. P. ECKERSLEY
(Chief Engineer of the British Broadcasting Company.)
T WILL endeavor to explain, within the first
I place, the historical past of broadcasting from
the start; secondly, a number of the
technical issues as they confronted
us yesterday and as they confront us to-
day; and, thirdly, the longer term as I see it.
I’m wondering what most of- you consider
broadcasting. I anticipate to some it’s a plea-
sant noise while washing up; to others- a
obligatory adjunct to any home; however to
the lonely individuals it’s a supply of continuous
enjoyment. Will we realise the potentialities
of what lies behind broadcasting? The spo-
ken phrase was once the the one means in
which one particular person might convey his ideas
to a different. I imagine broadcasting will convey
a revolution in our instances, as a result of it has the
energy of persona behind it. You may
by no means put into written issues the identical energy
that you may into spoken phrases. It doesn’t
matter what the talker goes to talk
about, all of it comes down to 1 factor, that
you’ve got behind broadcasting a persona
which is definitely in your room whenever you
are listening in. I’ve that honest feeling
about its potentialities.
One wonders that it was thought of
so little in the beginning. I had the privilege
of being one of many starting individuals in Eng-
land. About 1919 some fans, of whom
I used to be one, have been eager on the wi-fi tele-
telephone. We acquired collectively a variety of valves,
and optimism, mounted up an aerial, picked up
a microphone, and commenced to blow into it, I
am happy to say, with some impact. After
some time we started to speak, and 10,000 individuals
used to take heed to us. We even acquired some fa-
mous individuals to speak, and our enthusiasm
was labored as much as an infinite pitch. That
was the start. Folks will inform you that
broadcasting started in America, however I don’t
imagine that’s completely true. Anyway, the
first time I knew something about it was at
Chelmsford- The Postmaster-Basic at
that point stated that this factor had acquired to
cease, as a result of it was interfering with legiti-
mate companies. It stopped. Nonetheless, the flag
was stored flying by individuals whom we name ama-
teurs, who spend lengthy hours listening at
the ends of their telephones, some writing
books about all of it.
That was a tough time for wi-fi, however
these amateurs caught to it. They continuously
petitioned the Postmaster-Basic that there
is likely to be a station to take heed to, and beneath the
affect of those shock ways the Submit-
master-Basic ultimately permitted a
broadcasting station, however stated that this sta-
tion will need to have sure limitations put upon
its actions. The station should be solely 250
watts; transmission ought to solely happen
half-an-hour every week; between each merchandise
transmitted there needs to be a three-minute
silence; additionally that in between each merchandise we
ought to take heed to see that we weren’t inter-
fering with Authorities companies; and, fur-
ther, that our little 250 watts weren’t solely
for use in radiating the vitality, but in addition
for lighting the valves. We discovered that it
took 400 watts to mild the valves. So it
went on!
These have been nice days. The station was at
Writtle, close to Chelmsford. We merely picked
up the microphone, and, as something oc-
curred to us, so we’d ship it by.
We have been a really glad band of some 10,000
individuals. We gave a play, taking the components
of the characters ourselves. Think about an extended,
low hut, with wire all spherical, and all of us
speaking into little devices.
Very quickly individuals started to say that it was
very fascinating. There was an excessive amount of
speak the best way to begin broadcasting in Nice
Britain. The Postmaster-Basic referred to as to-
gether all of the producers in London, and
requested them to place up some rule with re-
gard to this; it took them six months. They
stated they have been producers of wi-fi
equipment, and needed to go about amongst
the general public competing in opposition to each other
for the sale of wi-fi receivers, which they
would have some problem in doing in the event that they
had no broadcasting service- They acknowledged
that they want to pool their curiosity
in a single central constructing, while competing
amongst themselves privately. They stated:
“We’ll place our authority in a single central
physique”; and that’s how the British Broad-
casting Firm got here into being. It was
not a Authorities monopoly, nor a personal
enterprise. The earnings have been restricted to 7i
per cent., and there was no chance of any
director making any greater than 11 per cent,
on the unique capital, and no probability of
their directing it in every other means than as
a public service. 1
Some individuals imagine that personal enter-
prise is the one factor to save lots of the nation.
Others says {that a} public management is essen-
tial, and {that a} factor like transport needs to be
beneath public management. Nonetheless, the British
Broadcasting Company appears to me to
have been a compromise between these
two issues, as a result of the general public had the fitting
to say once they have been dissatisfied with it,
and to dismiss the individuals there. I believe
it was an exceedingly good compromise, be-
trigger the officers weren’t everlasting offi-
cials. The chief stimulus I had was to make
the service successful as a public service. I
assume, subsequently, there was one thing to be
stated for the previous 8.8. C., as being one thing
fairly unique and sensible in the best way of an
effort to run a public service in England.
Folks say, how totally different it should be now
that we’re beneath the Authorities. I need
to tell you that we’re not beneath the
Authorities; the Authorities has much less con-
trol of broadcasting beneath the current sys-
tem than it did beneath the corporate system.
If you’ll learn our constitution and constitu-
tion, you will note that we’re freer to-day
to do issues than ever before- We’re given
a duty in the direction of the general public; if we are able to
perform the job we -are content material.
I need to draw a distinction with what’s
occurring in America. In these days of
Chelmsford, an newbie in America got- maintain
of a valve or two, and stated he had heard
sure issues. His agency, the Westinghouse,
stated what a marvellous factor it was. They
marketed and constructed devices. Imme-
diately they began telling the world, some-
physique in Schenectady sat down and acquired out a
related machine. Once more, anyone in a retailer
in New York stated that they have to get maintain
of this. Broadcasting grew in an evening; sta-
tions grew up. Folks talked and stored on
saying who they have been. After some time they
started to search for programmes, which the
artists carried out on the strains that if pub-
licity got to them they might give
the programmes free. Folks, nevertheless, acquired
drained, and so they began to make use of their wire-
much less units for getting outcomes from an extended dis-
tance. The entire thing then grew up on the
foundation of reaching out. By no means thoughts should you
had no concept of the programme; that didn’t
matter as long as you bought someplace farther
away—amount, fairly greater than high quality,
was most well-liked.
Regularly, nevertheless, individuals started to con-
centrate on their native stations, and the pro-
gramme was pressured to get higher and higher.
So the small junk station went; slowly the
larger stations started to get maintain, slowly the
factor started to settle all the way down to a public ser-
vice. Somebody began the thought of promoting the
time to advertisers. One might purchase time
from some central broadcasting station in
America in the identical means as one buys news-
paper house. At the start, nevertheless, this
was a failure as a result of the cost was too
low cost, and it solely turned successful when
individuals put an infinite worth upori such ad-
vertising. The individuals in America who’re
promoting time on this method are getting wealthy
and highly effective, and spreading their community
all around the nation. The state of affairs in Ame-
rica could be very totally different from what it’s in Eng-
land. I’m positive, England did prepared the ground
in displaying how broadcasting needs to be run
as a public service.
To come back to my second level, the technical
facet of broadcasting is so simple as something
on this planet. What occurs when one talks
into the microphone? Merely this: The
microphone is designed to select up your voice
and switch that voice into electrical vibrations.
The advantage of broadcasting is that you’re
capable of tie up your voice, so to talk, into an
electrical parcel, and distribute that voice to
each dwelling in Britain. It’s fairly apparent
that should you might shout loud sufficient your
voice can be heard all through London.
You may hear an individual speaking as a result of the
waves within the air carry the voice to you. The
farther he’s away, the fainter is his voice.
Supposing anyone provides you an equipment
referred to as a valve set which you set in your
ears, and so make them 4 instances as sen-
sitive; then you’re confronted with one other pro-
blem. Different persons are making different noises,
and so they additionally can be amplified. That dif-
ficulty is overcome through the use of totally different wave
lengths.
How can we improve the service space? By
transmitting at a lot higher energy. It might
be requested, if we need to have a really massive
service space, why not a 1000 kilowatt or a
10,000 kilowatt station? There’s a purpose

why we can not have one station to serve
the entire of Nice Britain, as an illustration. It
is as a result of affect of the 2 rays com-
ing out from a broadcasting station. One
ray, the sky ray, I’ll name it, rises at right-
angles from the earth; the opposite is the earth-
sure ray; the latter going alongside the bottom,
and the previous going up and coming down
once more. The earth-bound ray will get very drained
compared with the opposite. You may by no means
depend on the broadcasting between 200 and 600
metres until you’re in its direct ray.
How are you going to get good broadcast-
ing over a large space? Clearly, one of many
greatest methods is npt to have a number of high-powered
stations, however as many stations as you pos-
sibly can. We began the relay station sys-
tem in Britain, and located it labored nicely; on
a crystal set 60 per cent, of the inhabitants
might get programmes with none interrup-
tion- Our relay system introduced the enor-
mous inhabitants, particularly the noor~r popu-
lation, .throughout the scope of broadcasting.
Then we needed to contemplate the individuals within the
nation districts. We needed to come to the
conclusion that we couldn’t put up any
extra stations, as a result of there has be a cer-
tain density of inhabitants earlier than a station is
economical. It was determined {that a} central
station to replenish all these areas can be the
closing consummation of the primary a part of our
work; and, to chop an extended story quick, we
lastly acquired permission to work such a sta-
tion. We have been the primary individuals to consider a
long-wave station. The difficulty with quick
waves is that they peter out, you get
fading; the worth of lengthy waves is that you simply
don’t undergo from that fading in the identical
Method. Now with this lengthy energy tation, and
the relay stations, it signifies that 80 per cent
of the inhabitants of Nice Britain are ready
to take heed to the broadcasting.
What are we going to do sooner or later? It
is straightforward to criticise programmes, however a buddy
of mine who went throughout musical Germany
says he heard steady reward for the musi-
cal portion of the 8.8. C. programme. We
have a talks division, a musical depart-
ment, and lots of different departments. Num-
bers of individuals don’t give broadcasting the
consideration it deserves. It’s an c rtremely dif-
ficult matter to please everyone, and it
can be of nice worth if we might have
various programmed. To this finish we’re ,
constructing at Potters Bar, close to London, a twin
wave station, which would be the first of its
sort on this planet.
Having organised the entire of Nice Bri-
tain, the following step ahead appears to me to
be the linking up of nationwide programs, so
that they may interchange programmes
with each other. There isn’t any technical rea-
son why the entire of Europe shouldn’t
be linked up.

P.06 – 1928 in Evaluate and Retrospect[edit]

1928 IN REVIEW AND RETROSPECT By RAY ALLSOP (Affiliate Technical Editor.)

LET us pause and assessment radio in 1928 — one other yr of achievements. Radio transmission and broadcasting have turn out to be more and more essential components in our lives. Not is one residing in a distant nook of the globe, remoted from his fellow males. Radio now retains him in contact with all of the happenings on this planet, and as updated as the one who should purchase his morning and night newspaper. Commander Byrd and celebration, away down within the Antarctic — hundreds of miles away from civilisation —receiving by radio the occasions of the day, and transmitting to the world the story of their adventures. Earlier expeditions have gone down south, and have been
exceptional for years. One excellent achievement of radio in 1928 was the fixed communication between the “Southern Cross” and America, Hawaii, Fiji, and Australia, whereas the ’aircraft was in flight. All of the world was advised from Jimmy Warner’s key aboard the “Southern Cross” of the risks they have been passing by. The reader might keep in mind the indicators have been relayed from the “Southern Cross” by 2BL. Jimmy Warner will likely be, I’m positive, all the time remembered by radio males for his cool method on the key, sending out the continual stream of messages from the “Southern Cross.” In passing I’ll point out a comment by Jimmy Warner to myself. “I suppose it was tougher for you boys ashore to learn the indicators than for me to ship them.” How easy and cheap it’s in the present day to ship communications to any a part of the
world by way of “Beam.” Two-way phone conversations have been carried out by 2ME Sydney, and New York, 2XAF, additionally between Java and Sydney, and PCLL, Holland, and
Sydney. Now, assessment the broadcasting of to-day. In each capital metropolis of Australia is one or two highly effective stations transmitting wonderful programmes and longer hours than a lot of the world broadcasting programs, the technical high quality being equal to any of the world’s greatest stations. Each essential occasion of the day has been put over the air, virtually each essential short-wave station has been relayed with success. 1928 has seen speedy advance of the home receiver. The all-electric receiver, simply switched on as you’d your radiator or electrical iron. The loud speaker and pioneer valves have been developed to present replica so excellently we marvel how we ever listened to the old-timers. One other growth of the trendy loud speaker and energy amplifier is the electrical gramophone, the replica of
which has made the previous machine out of date. This growth has additionally made the “Talkies” — Speaking Movement Footage — doable. Probably tv. This department of the artwork will want an amazing quantity of experiment and enchancment earlier than something like perfection could be claimed. Nonetheless the event of radio has been so speedy one can marvel what subsequent. July, 1929, will current a brand new period in broadcasting when the entire system will come beneath Authorities management. Elements of outback Australia are usually not receiving a great service from the town stations, and the brand new management will most likely be the answer of this problem by offering the means for linking up an entire broadcasting chain. In a collection of articles commencing subsequent week I intend to place ahead a scheme for Australian broadcasting. Within the meantime I want all readers and listeners a affluent New 12 months, and to the experimenter a lot DX.

“Slim” De Villiers[edit]

(Begin Photograph Caption) “Slim” De Villiers, well-known parachute jumper, holding a conveyable broadcasting unit he used throughout a descent not too long ago in Los Angeles. The transmission from this unit — De Villiers’ description of his sensations as he descended — have been picked up beneath and rebroadcast by an area broadcasting station. This can be a stunt we might anticipate to see carried out right here in 1929. (Finish Photograph Caption)

Q.S.L. Playing cards[edit]

WE have obtained fairly various
Q.S.L. playing cards for Australian Hams—a
full checklist seems beneath. Will the senders
please be aware that these playing cards shouldn’t be
forwarded right here, however to the W.1.A., the place
the homeowners can decide up their very own playing cards.
u turning into a particularly costly
matter for us to pay the price of supply
{or fifty Q.S.L. playing cards per day’
Will the homeowners of the undermentioned playing cards
please name or ahead postage for his or her be-
longings :—3FC, 7CH, 2HC, 2KB, 2RB 2MF
SHG, 3MY, 2YJ, 6AG, 2LJ. 3GR, 2NS, 2ZT
2LG, 2KJ, 2LD, 2TW, 2NS, 2JH L T
Kermond (third District).
Three miniature crystal receivers constructed by Mr. J. C. jenkinson Kemp Avenue, Gramville. The replica is nearly actral measurement,
as could also be seen from the penny within the nicture. Every set brings within the native station clearly and with eacetlent quantity and tone
on an ardinary pair of headphones. Can any reader beat this document

P.07 – A Bracket of 4[edit]

A Bracket of 4

  1. Only a few listeners who entered the Sil-

houette Competitors might title the in-
dividuals within the Mild Music 4 who
contributed to the programme. This ex-
cellent mixture, nevertheless, needs to be
higher identified. We, subsequently, have pleas-
ure in re-introducing them on this web page.
117 7 E WENT as much as 2FC on what proved to
V/ be an eventful Tuesday night,
(y plunged in deep thought. Uncommon, as
you say; however obligatory. Ihe truth was,
have been apprehensive. We have been to fulfill the
lartet, and we had not determined how we
re going to interview 4 individuals without delay,
ur individuals! 4 tales! We wedged our
ty by the No. 2 swing door, nonetheless won-
ring the way it was to be achieved. The primary
ing (we don’t imply to be obnoxious) we
w, was Mr. Horace Keats in night gown
iking a beeline for the door. “Look right here,’
> stated, “you’ll be able to’t go right away! We’ve
t to interview you to-night, you understand.”
res, I do know,” replied Mr. Keats, “however what
tout the Eisteddfod? I’ve acquired to play there
»-night, you understand.” We stated, “Oh, we’ll do
iu first.” “How about Mr. Aspey?” requested
r. Keats. “He’s acquired to go to the Eisteddfod
o.” “He’ll come second,” we determined. “And
n in a rush to get away,” stated Miss Blair.
r e promised that Miss Blair can be third.
d Mr. Bryce Carter got here final. He’s by no means
i a rush. It’s the chief attribute of
ays when … However you will note how the
uartet solved the issue itself. The inter-
iew was to be a fugue for 4 voices, every
ne fading away because it completed its track,
harming! The very environment of Music.
So allow us to get on with the Baching.
Mr. Horace Keats got here out to Australia
Three years in the past with Nella Webb, on a Tivoli
ngagement. Since then he has offered pianos,
one on tour with a tent present, accompanied
>eter Dawson and Ella Caspers, travelled all
ver Australia, and what else did we would like
o know, as a result of, have a look at the time, for
leaven’s sake be fast. Oh, sure! He was
FC’s first pianist; performed for a time at 2BL,
,nd got here again to 2FC as conductor and
>ianist of the Quartet. Hardly as conduc-
or. The Quartet could be very a lot a Unity, and,
vith such, conductors are solely passengers.
‘Sure, thanks, Mr. Keats.” Exit the primary
heme.
“What let’s say about you, Mr. Aspey?”
Vlr. Aspey coughed and have become silent once more.
VLr. Keats put his head around the door. “Inform
m in regards to the championship,’’ he instructed
‘In fact,” stated Miss Blair, “he received the
Champion violin solo occasion within the Radio
Eisteddfod.” “Certainly,” we started; however Mr.
Keats was getting impatient. “Hurry up,’
he stated, “I’m ready to take him to the
City Corridor. Inform him your Life Story, Mr.
Aspey. You’ve acquired two minutes.” Thus
admonished Mr. Aspey stated, “I got here out to
New Zealand from England once I was two
years previous. Performed somewhat in New Zealand,
and came visiting to Sydney eight months in the past.
Joined the Quartet. I just like the work very
a lot. I don’t assume there’s the rest.”
Clearly the quiet Mr. Vincent Aspey needed
to get away in’, a rush. Exit the second
theme, to recur in a “Finale Concerto E
Minor” Motif on the City Corridor.
Miss Dulcie Blair gained her expertise as
a, violinist with the Verbruggen Orchestra, in
which she performed from its inception, ana
with which she toured Australia and New
Zealand. Afterwards, she toured New South
Wales, as a soloist. Miss Blair has been
related to broadcasting for 4 years
Performed within the 2BL Instrumental Trio xor
three and a half years. Joined the Dinner
Quartet when it was fashioned. In actual fact, whereas
From left to
proper: Mr. Bryce
Carter, cello Mr.
Horace Keats,
piano, Miss Dul-
cie Blair, violin;
Mr Vincent As-
pey, violin.
lio has shuffled to Mild Orchestra, Mild
rchestra to Quartet, Quartet to Symphony
rchestra, Symphony Orchestra to Quinte-,
[iss Blair has played serenely above the
niff ling. Often she has been left qmce
Lone; and we have yet to find something
etter to listen-in to than a sclo by Lulci.
Hair. Miss Blair, who, while we were thin*-
ig these things, was seated in one ot the
omfortable studio armchairs, stood up. *-
hink that’s all,” she said. “You’ll excuse me,
•on’t you? I’ve a lot of parcels to take
ome ” Exit the third theme, walking souls
‘ver the heavy Studio carpets, carrying a
urden of Christmas parcels under one arm,
md a violin and Galsworthy’s “Swan Song
mder the other.
Which left Mr. Bryce Carter, who, all this
ime had been sitting quietly amidst a maze
, f chairs in the dim background of the
tudio “Exactly what do you wish me to
.ell you?” asked Mr. Carter. We suggested
hat he should begin at the beginning. c
vere afraid this was not quite original; bin
t’s the kind of thing we’re used to. He

a id, “Well, I began to play the ’cello when

[ was thirteen, under George Howard. That
was in Melbourne. I came over here when
[ was fifteen, and finished my studies undex
3erard Vollner. He was a Dutchman, and
a great artist. In my earlier days I played
seventh ’cello in the Sydney Philharmonic.
lam still with the Philharmonic—as leader.
He looked down at the walking stick, without
which he would not be Mr. Bryce Carter, for
inspiration. “In 1908 1 was soloist with
Melba. Toured with Amy Castles m 1914,
and was with Amy Sherwm—yes,
S-H-E-R-W-I-N —let me see, how long ago
was that—”
Mr. Carter has played for 2BL and 21 >

P.08 – Programme Personalities[edit]

PROCRAMME
PERSONALITIES
Mabel Batchelor
MISS MABEL BATCHELOR seems
someplace on this web page, and has sung
from 2FC for the reason that inception of Aus-
tralian broadcasting Her singing-
profession started when she ieft college, and Miss
Batchelor has toured Australia with the
Agency, gone concerting with John Lemmone,
and performed lead for the varied newbie ope-
ratic societies for a while. Just a few years
in the past she settled down in Sydney for broad-
casting and live performance work: and has made
herself very well-known to New South Wales
listeners-in.
“There are only a few live shows now-
adays, ’ she stated. “In actual fact, the one
individuals who maintain live shows stepping into Australia
are the Scots. The Caledonian Societies nonetheless
organise their live shows all through Australia.”
We puzzled why. “I don’t know,” laughed
Miss Batchelor, “until they want to see what
they’re getting. In fact, broadcasting
has made live shows pointless; and it makes
little or no distinction to the artists. Be-
sides, one doesn’t must spend cash on
fairly garments.”
Miss Batchelor has observed many adjustments
in broadcasting strategies throughout her associa-
tion with 2FC. “Each time I come right here,”
she remarked, “I discover one thing new—new
microphones, new studio home equipment, new
faces. Particularly since they nave moved into
the brand new studios,” She sighed. “However I miss
the Roof Backyard on the previous Studio. It used
to be so cool there in summer time; and, nicely,
broadcasting was very amusing in its eariy
days.
Sure; I’ve all the time discovered broadcasting
fascinating,” she stated, “and I’ve had many
gratifying instances. I used to be one of many first celebration
to broadcast from Canberra; and I keep in mind
broadcasting from the previous ‘Tiugira’ earlier than
she was scuttled.” Miss Batchelor has additionally
taken half in lots of hospital events. “I like
the skin broadcasts,” she stated. “We used
to go as much as Wentworth Falls—eight or ten
of us—in automobiles. The going-there is all the time
a part of the enjoyable.”
Miss Batchelor has solely two formulation for
appropriate broadcasting. “You see,” she stated, “I
was bred to live performance singing; and I discover it
obligatory all the time to think about an viewers
Uncle Ben of 4QO
and his blind as-
sistant, Stanley.
Then I am going forward as I’d
in a live performance corridor. There may be
just one different factor to re-
member —that’s, to not sing
too loudly. It solely spoils the
transmission.”
Ewart Chappie
THERE are two sorts of
onerous jobs in a Radio
Studio. The primary is
that of the announcer.
The second, of the official
accompanist. The accompan-
ist should be an artist, a sight-
reader, and a really Tactful
Particular person if he’s going to
succeed. He should be ready
to show, with excellent equani-
mity, from accompanying a
comedian track to enjoying in aj
quartet, or to accompany *
Wagner! All this with out
discover—with out having pre-
viously seen the music.
Take a look at Mr. Ewart Chappie, accompanist
to 2FC for the reason that station started enterprise.
There isn’t any a part of studi ) routine which he
has not been by, at a while or different.
He has been announcer, has lectured on
music, launched nice artists, and performed
for them.
Having lived within the wnirl of broadcasting
for the previous three and a half years he’s now
part of the studio. He was even married
by radio. The story goes that Mr.
Chappie was racing into city in his first automotive
to maintain a rehearsal appointment with a lady
he didn’t know very nicely. He smashed up
his automotive, arrived in time for the rehearsal,
and married the lady, the then Miss Marie
Bremner. He has spent an excessive amount of time
since then in an try to show that the
smash-up of his automotive was actually a great omen
for the longer term.
Mr. Chappie pictures and swims, and
does different respectable issues—in accordance with
Mr. Chappie. These vices come out within the
course of the primary two hours. We should
have seemed disenchanted, as a result of he turned
his eyes in the direction of the ceiling, and remarked
innocently, “It’s a really uninteresting life,
actually.” We caught the inflection aud
laughed, after which Mr. Chappie started to inform
tales. In fact, he and Mr G. Vern Bar-
nett supervise all of the exams of artists. Be-
tween them, they’re purported to know
many great and unrepeatable tales.
However some will come out.
There may be the story of the younger singer who
ran all the way down to Farmer’s. Radio Division to
hear her voice getting back from Pennant
Hills.
There was the mad lady who com-
plained that she had 40 or 50 voices in her
ears, and requested Mr. Chappie to show the
radio off.
There was the impromptu announcer at
2FC’s Radio Eisteddfod, who introduced to
New South Wales, after a tussle with a set-
description, “By G—, Boss, that was a tough
one!”
(Beneath) Mr.
Ewart Chappie,
accompanist,
at 2FC.
(Above),
Miss Mabel
Batchelor.
Mr. Chappie has ac-
companied many nice
artists—Elsa Stralia,
John Brownlee, and
Scamuzzi being amongst
these introduced. He
spent many lengthy hours
persuading Joseph His-
lop to broadcast to
England. “A lot of the
nice ones are extra
nervous in entrance of a
microphone than earlier than
an viewers,” he stated.
“It’s virtually embarrassing to observe them.”
The strategy of broadcasting piano ac-
companiments is sort of totally different from that of
the live performance platform, in accordance with Mr
Chappie. “It’s ten instances tougher,” he stated,
“You could be capable to learn something at sight.
Generally the music is marked in ciphers
that appear like something from a whale to an
anchor. Then you need to be ready for
the nervous singer, who makes some extent of
hopping six bars on each web page. As to play-
ing. I discover that the center registers broad-
solid greatest. Bass notes tend to
flatten out —in truth, it is rather onerous to get
them over in any respect. And the dealing with is
extra staccato—hardly any pedal.”
Thelma Prepared Bach Once more
fJpHELMA READY, together with her banjo, is all the time
a well-liked customer to 3LO, and a heat
welcome will await her when she seems
earlier than the microphone on January 18. The
days of Miss Prepared’s banjo enjoying information
from the time of the return of her father
Miss Thelma
Prepared.
from America, the place
he had been so cap-
tivated by the possi-
bilities of the banjo,
He introduced one again
for his little daugh-
ter, who made such
progress beneath the
steerage of native
lecturers that she
was suggested to con-
tinue her research in
Melbourne. Since
her arrival in Aus-
tralia, some two or three years in the past, she has
achieved an excessive amount of work, each as a soloist
and as a frontrunner of her personal orchestra. She
was chosen to play at a reception accorded
to Dame Nellie Melba, who warmly compli-
mented the younger artist, and, regardless of her
very full engagement checklist to play at many
social features, nonetheless finds time to enormously
add to the delight of listeners.

P.09 – Talks from 2LO are Illustrated by Broadcast Footage[edit]

Talks from 2LO are Illustrated
by Broadcast Footage
Getting your crosswords and cartoons by radio. . .Baird Tv Assessments. . .Empire^oMn S
cZs . British Exhibition. . .French Developments. . .New Get better, and Elements. . .
Basic London Notes
By J. E. GRAHAM
(London Correspondent to “Wi-fi Weekly )
I PICTURE transmission has truly star-

  • ted in England and (extra not too long ago) in

Germany. In England the transmissions
are from Daventry, SXX, and take
ice from 2 to 2.25 p.m. on week-days. The
dinary listener hears nothing however a collection
squeaks and splutters, and the proud (?)
/ner of a Pultograph will get fairly a foul
cture with a variety of scratchy strains throughout it
and never a lot shading.
The system appears to work nicely for car-
ons, crosswords, and many others., however not for mild and
lade photos. Neither is it sure that the
.B.C. are going to proceed image trans-
itions. They are saying that they’re ready to
>e whether or not the general public goes to utilise the

rvice absolutely and make it price whereas to con-

nue. The general public, alternatively, is
aiting to see whether or not the service is to be-
ome an everyday one earlier than it buys its Fulto-
raph. And so in the mean time every is wait-
ig for the opposite to start. What’s going to
lappen subsequent?
Image transmission was demonstrated at
ioth the Manchester and Paris exhibitions,
tnd was the centre of attraction at each
jecause of its novelty and never due to its
mality, be it stated! The Pultograph system
vas demonstrated at each, although in France
t is named Sferographe. A second system,

he Belinographe, was additionally on view in Paris.

Tv
r PHE 8.8. C. has ultimately consented to witness
1 an indication of tv given by
tiie Baird Tv Improvement Firm.
After the demonstration the company an-
nounced that whereas they thought it interest-
ing as an experiment, “it did not fulfil the
circumstances which might justify trial trans-
mission by a 8.8. C. station and, accord-
ingly, no experimental transmission will likely be
undertaken at current.” This, for my part,
just isn’t a shocking resolution, because the demon-
stration I noticed at Olympia was not impres
sive. Nonetheless, it has created fairly a pe-
culiar state of affairs, for the 8.8. C. has a mono-
poly on broadcasting, and tv evidently
falls inside this.
So the Baird Tv Improvement Com-
pany just isn’t allowed to indicate its wares, so to
converse, and the shareholders are to undergo in
consequence. One wonders why they may
not have the usage of the Bondon stand-by
transmitter at Marconi Home. This trans-
mitter is barely used when London breaks
down. However the thoughts of the 8.8. C. is tough
to grasp at instances!
Empire Broadcasting
SSW is within the limelight once more, and as soon as
extra the press is stuffed with letters suggesting
that its value of £lO,OOO a yr needs to be
•borne by the Colonies. Why ought to the
poor English taxpayer pay for this station
when it’s the Colonies (horrid phrase!) which
are deriving the profit? And so forth, and
so forth.
And nonetheless the 8.8. C. calls the station “ex-
perimental.” When is it to be made some-
factor greater than “experimental”? That’s
what the Colonies need to know. Then,
maybe, they may provide to pay some ox
the price —during which case they might, of
course, dictate instances of transmission, wave-
lengths, and many others. And the way would the 8.8. C. like
that 9 And do the Colonies need Empire
broadcasts? Issues are, removed from being
settled on this query anyway.
Radio Reveals
tiINCE the Nationwide Radio Exhibition at
Olympia in September, two different im-
portant reveals have been held, one at Man-
chester and the opposite at Paris. The Man-
chester Exhibition didn’t differ enormously
from the London one, and virtually all well-
identified English equipment was on view at
each. However, whereas at London one noticed no-
factor that was not English, at Manchester
foreign-made equipment was allowed and was
a lot in proof. Philips (Holland)
confirmed their “bandbox” sort receivers, some
of them mains operated. These I described
in my notes in August “Radio.” Basic
Radio (America) had some enticing cry-
stal managed wave metres on view, as nicely
as their typical line in rheostats and whatnot.
Crossley (America) had a brand new receiver referred to as
the “Gembox.” Some French and German
equipment was additionally on present.
Radio in France
‘THEN got here the Paris Exhibition, the “Salon
L de T.S.F.” And something extra un-
just like the English reveals can be onerous to
think about. Within the first place France makes use of however
one sort of set—the superheterodyne. From
this it’s straightforward to grasp that it’s quan-
tity and never high quality they like. French
producers have as but paid little or no
consideration to the Audio Frequency facet of
their units and, because of this, transferring coil loud-
audio system are unknown. And they’ll con-
tinue to be unknown so long as the current
system of Audio Frequency coupling is used,
viz., low-class transformers. Battery elimina-
tors are virtually unknown (excellent for
the producers of dry B batteries!) and
even’ battery chargers are primarily of the vi-
brator and arc sorts. Neither is the dry recti-
fier used in any respect. The precise electrical con-
struction of the units is poor, however the cupboard
work leaves nothing to be desired. In actual fact,
a number of the receivers are in cupboards virtually
as massive as a piano. These normally embrace
an electrical gramophone.
Development of Manufacture
TT is fascinating to notice the pattern of manu-
■*- facture of receivers in England now. The
three-valve set is growing in reputation,
whereas the single-valver goes out virtually
utterly. Additionally five-valve units are actually
extra standard than 4. In radio frequency
levels screened grid valves are used sn 80
per cent, of three-valve units, and 50 per cent,
of four-valve units. Capability managed re
motion is most typical and transformer
coupling continues to predominate in audio
frequency levels.
In moveable units one management is most popu-
lar and although the screened grid valve has
hardly made its look right here as but, no
doubt it will come quickly. Most portables
use 5 valves—2 R.F., detector, 2 A.F. The
R.F. coupling is normally a periodic, and th

P.10 – Effectively-known Musical Authorities, 2FC Programmes[edit]

Effectively-Recognized Musical Authorities
Prepare Weekly Classical Programmes From 2FC
World s greatest music will likely be heard in these new studio live performance. Tune in to Mr.
Oliver King s programme on January 9, Mr. Horace Keats’ on January 16, andl
Mr. Ernest Chappie’s on Jnury 3.
THE resolution of the New South Wales
Broadcasting • Firm, Restricted, to
endeavor to rearrange steady pro-
grammes on a minimum of one evening every week
displaying a really particular leaning in the direction of clas-
sical renditions is now taking sensible type.
Quite a few professors on the Conservato-
rium and leaders within the musical lifetime of Syd-
ney have been approached and their co-operation
was readily forthcoming.
The target of the administration in
arranging a steady programme of classi-
cal music, which won’t be damaged into by
any extraneous efficiency from throughout the
vary of “jazz” or the “lowbrow,” is to search out
whether or not there are ample listeners who
want the one sort of full programme.
It isn’t the intention of the corporate how-
ever, to permit each stations to cater for what
wiay be termed “intellectual” within the one even-
ing, as whereas the classical programme is
being rendered from one station, the opposite
will likely be assembly the necessities of these
who don’t aspire to the classics in music.
The primary of those programmes will likely be
ready by Mr. Oliver King, who has
organized a classical programme of orchestral
music to be broadcast on Wednesday Janu-
ary 9. On the next Wednesday,’ Janu-
ary 16, Mr. Horace
Keats is arranging a
programme of Chamber
music, whereas on Wed-
nesday, January 23, Mr.
Ewart Chappie is ar-
ranging a programme
from Russian compos-
ers. Different programmes
are being mentioned with
Merrs. Laurence God-
frey Smith, Roland
Foster, Cyril Monk,
Arnold Mote, Vern Bar-
nett, Alexander Sver-
jensky, Harold Whittle,
Frank Hutchens, Lind-
ley Evans, Madame
Viceroy Goossens, Ma-
dame Emily Marks, and
others.
A really particular transfer
on this path is now
being made within the
United States of Ame-
rica beneath the pinnacle of
“Sponsored Professional-
grammes.” A quantity
of main musical
our bodies within the States,
fearing that the craze
of “jazz” music was
overwhelming all of the
higher instincts of the
public in relation to
classical music, have
organized with some
of the chain stations
for linking up pro-
grammes at their very own
expense, and are thus
making Use of wi-fi

educative marketing campaign.
A number of the massive adver-
tising corporations in the US have
seen potentialities in these first-class “Spon-
sored Programmes,” and in lots of instances the
complete value of the productions, in which-many
of the best American solo artists are en-
gaged, has been borne by these corporations as an
promoting medium.
It is going to be obligatory for the listening pub-
lic to play its half in expressing an opinion
in regard to this classification of pro-
grammes. For it is going to solely be by the letters
obtained on the broadcasting stations that
the administration will be capable to type an
concept as as to if the blended programme is
nonetheless to predominate, or whether or not there are
ample listeners interestd to warrant the
extra positively ready programme of a set
character.
We now have seen the primary two of those clas-
sified programmes—that of Mr. Oliver King,
organized for January 9, and that of Mr.
Horace Keats, for January 16.
Mr. King’s programme appeared in our
final quantity. The artists are: Gerald Wa-
lenn, Bryce Carter, Gwen Selva, Dagmar
Roberts, and Oliver King. Mr. King will
lead in some neighborhood singing by the stu-
dio viewers. Composers represented are:
Arensky, Chopin, Veracini, Brahms, Leclair-
Kreisler, Strauss, Schubert, Mozart, Schu-
•nanS’ r, anc *- Smetana. The last-mentioned
is a Bohemian, whose choral work, “The Bar-
tered Bridge,” has made him well-known “The
Bartered Bride” has been sung by the Royal
Sydney Philharmonic Society.
Mi. Horace Keats’ programme seems in
this subject. The battle will open with the
overture to the “Barber of Seville,” performed
by an orchestra beneath Mr. Keats’ baton.
Miss Dulcie Blair will play Dvorak’s little-
identified Sonatina in G to Mr. Keats’ accom-
paniment. Mr. Clement Q. Williams will
sing, amongst others, a bracket of three Irish
people songs organized by the well-known Herbert
Hughes, whos life has been spent in search
of previous melodies. Miss Le Brun Brown is
wo Sl h?< f u Ur ™ oder . n son g s : “A Lady’s Final Phrase, by Granville Bantock; “Weathers” O’Nem “®£ ss £ m Track ’” b y Norman Bridge 1 ’ “a w Gol , de n Hair,” by Prank E g n e ; _ A Lady’s Final Phrase” is a set- • n iL 0f - Brownm g s poem. Norman O’Neill is the very well-known composer who wrote the incidental music to “Mary Rose.” tv Advancing TSTT is turning into a longtime I m America. That is proved by 1 the announcement that an American division retailer has already inquired as to the potential of broad- casting a Trend Evaluate, different adver- tisers are on the war- path—some wanting to televise ebook covers, gross sales speak, and cigarette packages. “Maybe inside six months,” says an American journal, “such com- mercial ‘sponsored’ tele- imaginative and prescient broadcasts will turn out to be an on a regular basis incidence, and nobody will assume in any other case of them.” Sure, sure; it is going to be pleasant—for the advertisers. »

IN New Zealand re-
cently a solicitor
was fined for be-
ing in possession
of an unlicensed wire-
much less set. He pleaded
responsible.
“He takes this hard-
ly,” stated his counsel,
“for he has broadcast
many talks for 3YA,
and considers himself
not ‘honest sport.”’ Fined
20/, with prices. And,
in fact, being a soli-
citor, he might thor-
oughly sympathise with
himself.
EVERY MAN HIS OWN JAZZ BAND
Above we glimpse into the house of the conservative Smythe-Brown’s o-
Level liper, whose quietly unique dances have been completely revolu-
tionised by the person receiving set. One time it was that the Smythe-
Brown’e affairs have been thought of a trifle uninteresting by the youthful set as a result of <>+
the fondness of the Smythe-Brown’s for old school dances. Now, nevertheless
the t.ounger set might dance as they please, whereas Aunt Elspeth joins her
bachelor buddy (such an previous affair) in a polka.
The cult is spreading, too. If pausing within the door of an area dance corridor
quickly, you’re amazed to see {couples} waltzing across the room in full
silence, don tgo and put your head beneath a faucet. In a Berkhamstead (Eng
land) lodge 20 {couples} not too long ago danced to radio music, unheard by the
amazed spectators. Every dancer wore inconspicuous headphones, by
which she or he heard the phantom strains from the distant orchestra.

P.11 – New Programme Options[edit]

New Programme Options
2FC and 2BL
Mr. Chappie’s Programme
f)N WEDNESDAY NIGHT, JANUARY 23,
U Mr. Ewart Chappie is endeavor the
path of the classical programme which is
now a weekly characteristic of 2FC’s transmissions.
He’ll commit it to Russian composers, and
music lovers will benefit from the objects which have
been chosen.
Pier Live performance
NEGOTIATIONS ARE IN PROGRESS for
the transmission of a live performance programme
from the brand new pier at Coogee. The “Night time on
Manly Seaside” broadcast by 2BL beneath the
path of Basil Kirke and Charles Regulation-
rence, was some of the profitable pro-
grammes of its sort ever undertaken. The
vacation evening, January 26, has been tenta-
tively pencilled for the Coogee Pier live performance.
Dandies
rpHE BLUE AND GOLD DANDIES, success-
A ful opponents within the revue part of
the Eisteddfod, are showing at 2BL on
Thursday, January 24. The members of this
excellently balanced mixture are artists
of particular person advantage, and the revue they’ve
ready is refreshingly new. Listeners might
look ahead with pleasure to their preliminary
look on the air.
Taree’s Acquire
r> USSELL RIX is in Sydney for the college
11 trip, and 2FC have been fast to
benefit from his presence in arranging
studio appearances. His is likely one of the most
pleasing baritones now we have on the air, and it
is to be regretted his college duties necessitate
nation service, thereby depriving listeners
of the pleasure of listening to him extra fre-
quently. Our loss, nevertheless, is Taree’s achieve,
the place he’s in nice demand at public and
personal social features. Mr. Rix possesses
an enthralling persona, and his singing is
most inventive. He’ll seem at 2FC on
Tuesday, January 22.
Farewell Speak
REV. F- H. RAWARD leaves the State early
within the new yr, however earlier than he goes lis-
The REV. E. H.
RAWARD
teners could have an-
different alternative of
listening to an fascinating
collection of talks he has
ready beneath the
title of “Tales of a
Traveller.” Mr. Raward
has a most profitable
“air voice,” which provides
significantly to the
worth of the actually
good materials at his
command. He’s a
a lot travelled man,
gifted without delay with the
eager notion of the
stunning, and a posi-
tively uncanny knack of unearthing curious
data concerning the locations, nicely off the
typical vacationer observe, into which he strays. His
talks are full of a fund of dry humor,
and he possesses an enormous following on the air.
The primary of the collection is about down for Monday
evening, January 21.
Gold-diggers
Ityfß. BASIL KIRKE, of 2BL, is shortly to
give a collection of afternoon talks on “The
Romance of New Guinea Gold.” “The sub-
ject is extraordinarily fascinating.” says Mr. Kirke.
“as a result of the hardships and privations suf-
fered by the prospectors have been higher than
these of the Klondike or every other gold
discipline.”
Prof, and Ballot T tf”
“-PROFESSOR and POLLY PEDAGOGUE
x have stumble on an uncommon act, which,
beca use of its originality, will discover favor wit
listeners. The Professor is of the oldl sch ,
and his trendy daughter, Poliy>
activity Zero f “changing” him in accordance with pres
e nt-day requirements—the outcome ts 5 minu
of good dialogue, during which the professional
capitulates totally to the triumphant
“Polly.” A number of old-tim songs will full
this uncommon programme to be given at 2BL
Zero n Tuesday, January 22..
Quite a lot of thriller surrounds this
fairly face. It belongs to the Ahad Duo,
the metal guitar gamers at 2BL. Nobody
has been capable of inform us which half of
the Duo it belongs to —however we will not be
flawed if we are saying the prettiest half.
Eisteddfod Artists
AJOW THAT MOST of the artists who have been
profitable within the current Radio Eistedd-
fod performed by the New South Wales
Broadcasting Firm, Restricted, have re-
turned to city after the temporary vacation dur-
ing the festive season, listeners could have an
alternative of listening to the expertise which was
dropped at mild by, this distinctive competitors.
On Tuesday night, January 22, Ivy Inexperienced,
who received the soprano part, is making her
bow to listeners by 2BL Service, and on
the identical evening Theodore Atkinson, success-
ful within the baritone part, is showing at
2BL.
3LO AND 3AR
All Roimd Chicago
(CONTINUING HIS BREEZY travellogue
talks on America, Professor Berry, of
the Melbourne College, will talk about “Chi-
cago—the Metropolis of Superlatives,” and “The
Very Human Metropolis of Chicago,” on January
15 and 17.
Outdated English Melodies
MISS MAISIE RAMSAY, whose sensible
soprano voice ought to carry her far in
her chosen career, will likely be heard from
3LO on Tuesday. January 15, in choices
from early English melodies, amongst which
will likely be included “My Mom Bids Me Bind
My Hair,” “The Lass with the Delicate Air,”
and “When Love is Type.” Because the com-
mencement of her skilled profession, Miss
Ramsay has achieved remarkably nicely, each as
a scholar and within the competitors world, and
has not too long ago made her debut in grand opera
with the J. C. Williamson Firm.
“ Followers ”
A REFRESHING TRIFLE, “Followers,”
from the versatile pen of Harold Brig-
home, will likely be introduced by Miss Winifred
Moverley and her intelligent colleagues, from
3AR, on January 14. Listeners are requested to
visualise the inside of Miss Baine’s parlor
on the English village of Cranford within the
June of 1859, with its mid-Victorian acces-
sories of crochet antimacassars and wax fruit,
jealously guarded beneath glass instances, whereas
the query of “Followers” is discreetly dis-
stubborn by the expensive women of the village. As-
sisting Miss Moverley on this event will
be Miss Lola Martin, Miss Ivy Broadley, and
Mr. T. Bernard Lamble, who will every con-
tribute to a efficiency of all-round excel-
lence.
All the things O.IC.
A REFRESHING MUSICAL interlude is
promised on Thursday, January 17,
when “The O’Kay’s,” beneath the path of
Mr. George English, will submit a range
of songs, glees, and choruses from 3AR Stu-
dio. Mr. English, who is aware of all there’s to
be identified about musical productions and
choral societies, has organized a wonderful
programme, starting from negro spirituals to
the well-known Sextette from “Lucia,” and lis-
teners shouldn’t fail to search out the entertain-
ment supplied by the “O’Kay’s” distinctly
O.Okay.
Sunny Italy
“PRANCES FRASER, who might all the time be re-
x lied upon for a delightfully fascinating
and picturesque speak, will converse once more from
3LO on January 18, this time giving some
impressions of many months spent Amongst
the Artists of Florence.” Because the Florentine
image galleries are among the many best within the
World, and include some priceless artwork trea-
sures, the speak given by Miss Fraser, who’s
conversant with the historical past surrounding toe
majority of those masterpieces, needs to be or
greater than typical curiosity.
Tips on how to Deal With Emergencies
IyTRS. HENRIETTA WALKER,’ whose talks
to outback settlers have been so inter-
esting and instructive, will once more converse from
MRS HENRIETTA
WALKER ,
3LO on January 17,
this time taking for
her topic “Emergen-
cies.” On this speak she
will cowl a large space,
coping with the numerous
unexpected circum-
stances that come up in
the every day lifetime of a brand new
settler, and provides sug-
gestions for assembly
the emergencies. Few
persons are higher ready
to take care of this sub-
ject than Mrs. Walker,
who has not solely brav-
ed the inconveniences
of the back-blocks for a few years, however, as a
results of her remark and resourcefulness,
established the brand new cottage trade of mak-
ing luggage and mats from plaited and dyed
tree bark.
Contralt and Tenor
rpWO POPULAR VOCALISTS, Mr- and
Madame Gregor Wooden, will likely be broadcast-
ing from 3LO on January 16, in a well-select-
ed programme of solos and duets for tenor
and contralto. Each artists have been earlier than
the general public for a few years, and are acquainted
and welcome figures on the live performance platform
and within the broadcasting studio.

P.12 – Why Governments Management Broadcasting[edit]

Wi-fi Weekly. Incorporating “Radio in Australia and New Zealand.” FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1929

The Cause Why Governments Management Broadcasting Whereas the Authorities management of broadcasting in Australia has but to happen, it’s already a truth in most different nations on this planet. The element coverage of the Authorities subsequent July remains to be a matter of conjecture, however, in actuality, there’s nothing novel within the basic proposals. England has had centralised Authorities management of broadcasting, directed by a committee of specialists appointed by Parliament, for a while. In the US, though the stations are performed by personal people and considerations, they’re instantly accountable to a Authorities Fee for the retainment of their permits to broadcast. This fee workouts a strict management and censorship. Two years in the past France decreed State supervision of radio. A interval of 5 years was granted present broadcasters, on the finish of which era all French broadcasting stations will likely be nationalised. Germany has State management, though it’s primarily run on the strains laid down by the essential and highly effective business pursuits. The Scandinavian nations additionally train nationwide management of their stations, as do most different European nations. Russia, specifically, has an particularly strict censorship of broadcasting, consistent with her coverage in different instructions. Within the East, India’s stations are beneath British supervision, and the Japanese Authorities runs its personal stations with inflexible censorship. Thus we see that Authorities management of broadcasting exists all around the world. This situation just isn’t merely a coincidence of concepts; it has particular significance. The truth that broadcasting is one thing which can’t be confined to a sure territory at will, makes it political, and a weapon of nationalistic propaganda. Aside from the unreadable propaganda from RFN, and an occasional Americanism from W2XAD, we, in Australia, don’t expertise a lot bother, however in Europe it’s a totally different matter. Right here, the place nationwide rivalry is eager, and hatred intense, broadcasting is usually each a political weapon of assault and defence. And now that broadcasting is turning into much more worldwide, and reaching, we’re falling into line with the remainder of the world.

Adjustments in Broadcasting Management
It’s reported formally that the Federal Authorities has taken over the Perth broadcasting station 6WF, and that the service will now be carried on by the Postmaster-Basic’s Division. Though no particulars have been introduced thus far, it’s understood that the Postal officers will run the service, each the engineering and programmes. Thus we see a begin within the new developments foreshadowed for a while. About six months in the past Mr. Bruce stated his Authorities had determined to alter the tactic of management of the broadcasting companies. Below the brand new regime the Authorities would personal and function the engineering companies of the stations and go away the programmes to individuals extra skilled within the enterprise. That will imply coming into right into a contract with an leisure or broadcasting organisation for a time period of years. That fairly radical change adopted surprisingly some negotiations that had been continuing for some months between the present corporations, which had carried on the companies within the totally different States since broadcasting started in 1924. The negotiations for an amalgamation of the businesses had been inaugurated on the occasion of the Authorities, which desired one co-ordinated service all through the States. These negotiations naturally fell by, though very appreciable progress had been made in arranging for one all-Australian firm to enhance and lengthen the companies. Because the Prime Minister’s announcement concerning the brand new coverage of management and administration an advisory board has been arrange. That board is arranging plans for the brand new order of issues, and presumably the acquisition of the Perth station is step one. It is going to be fascinating to listeners to see how the change will work out, and if it is going to imply higher service to most of the people. In taking on the West Australian station the Authorities has turn out to be answerable for a completely new class of official exercise, and in circumstances that aren’t too encouraging. While within the Jap States, owing to cautious consideration to the enterprise, and with a full information and vast expertise of entertaining the general public a lot of the corporations have constructed up enticing companies which have held the curiosity of listeners in hundreds, the Perth Station has not been profitable. Regardless of the causes might have been, the service of 6WF has been a monetary failure. And the variety of listeners has decreased steadily since about eighteen months in the past, when the modest complete of about 4300 individuals paid for licences. With such a small variety of licences the income has naturally been low, whereas the expenditure in operating the station has been as excessive as it might have been if there have been many extra hundreds of aerials intercepting the transmissions in West Australia. Whether or not the Authorities will be capable to
enhance issues will likely be fascinating to observe. Probably the programmes might have been materially improved if an skilled organisation had been entrusted with their
preparation and rendition; however the Authorities doesn’t look like considering any association with such an organisation at current. Below Mr. Bruce’s scheme there will likely be some association in a while; why it isn’t inaugurated now could be obscure. Apparently the Authorities goes to strive its hand at operating all of the
companies of 6WF for some time.

P.12 – Across the World on a Motor Cycle[edit]

Across the World on a Motor Cycle.
DR. JULIUS DE VILNITS is 24 years previous,
and has travelled over greater than half
the world, 67,000 miles, through the previous
forty-one months. He has solely 37,000
miles to go now, and expects to finish
his world tour at his native city, Riga, by
the top of 13 months, with the help of his
motor cycle.
One can not tra-
vel by Lat-
by way of, Lithuania,
Poland, Czecho-
slovakia, Ger-
many, Switzer-
land, S 1 avi a,
Greece, France,
Turkey, Asia
Minor, Italy, Aus-
tria, Hungary,
uugo-Slavia, Sy-
ria, Mesopotamia,
Palestine, Egypt,
Mecca, Sudan,
Erhthrea, Abys-
Dr. Julius de Vilnits.
sinia, the Belgian Congo, Djibouti, Aden,
Burma, French Indo-China, China, Man-
churia, Korea, Japan, Formosa, Hongkong,
Macao, Canton, Philippine Islands, British
North Borneo, Sarawak, Straits Settlements,
Sumatra, Sourabaya, Batavia, Bali, Timor,
New Guinea, the Celebes, Banjoevang, Derby,
and all through Australia with out placing
journey, and Dr. de Vilnits has struck it
in massive portions.
He was in China when that charming
nation was amusing itself with revolutions
and executions, and had an thrilling time
avoiding the mobs, which managed to shoot
his companion, a journalist. He travelled
for seven weeks by tropical jungles:
in truth he appears to have adopted dying aa
carefully as doable with out truly catching
as much as it.
On the fineness of this adjustment he’s
a lot to be congratulated, as a result of it has
given him a wealth of invaluable information for the
ebook he intends to put in writing, and unfathomabla
depths of expertise from which he can
pour out information in eleven languages for
radio audiences, reporters who reside in ruts,
and different nonentities.
Dr. de Vilnits has broadcast addresses from
throughout Europe, from Tokio, Java, Singapore,
Manila; from Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne,
Sydney, and Queensland. You heard him
from 2BL on the second of January. “Ber-
lin is one of the best European station,” he stated,
“however it’s all so totally different out right here. Jn
Europe there’s little or no morning session,
and through the afternoons ana nights they
transmit mainly opera.”
Shrewd Scheme
A CERTAIN Radio dealer marketed his
trial-in-your-home provide. Two younger
males got here in on Friday and secured a
moveable set “on trial.” it was re-
turned on Monday. “Not fairly the factor,”
they stated. On the next Friday they re-
turned and took one other make of moveable
away. This, additionally, was returned the following
Monday, however not earlier than the supervisor, on a
Sunday jaunt in his automotive, had seen the 2
younger males amongst a picnic celebration listening-in
to the moveable set. So when the younger males
returned to get one other set for trial he was
prepared for them. “My enterprise has already
been badly knocked by placing units out
on trial,” he stated, “and I’ve determined that
in future I can’t take one other set again.”
Exit the younger males.

P.13 – The Security Valve[edit]

The Security Valve
Readers are urged to precise their opinions
on issues pertaining to broadcasting. If
you’ve got some grievance, if in case you have some
constructive criticism to supply, right here is your
probability for expression—your safety-valve. The
editor assumes no duty for state-
ments made by readers and printed on this
web page, as opinions of correspondents don’t
signify our editorial insurance policies or e tefs.
Nameless letters are usually not thought of.
Radio Eisteddfod
Pricey Sir—lf I’ll trespass in your cour-
tesy and house I ought to like, as one of many
listening public, to touch upon the outcomes
of the Radio Eisteddfod.
One excellent truth is that the instru-
psychological sections have been vastly superior to the
vocal —the opposite sections I don’t intend
to talk of as they appear to have been even
extra futile than the 2 talked about.
Within the vocalist part I significantly want
to attract consideration to the next factors:
The winner of the bass part didn’t, by
any stretch of creativeness, have a bass
voice; by its timbre it ought to have been clas-
sified as baritone, and it was not even a
heavy baritone; but amongst the finalists
there have been a minimum of two true bass voices. In
the soprano part the winner’s voice was a
mild mezzo—it had not the brightness of
timbre of the true soprano, in truth, it sounded
over the air like a mezzo that had been
educated to a soprano’s pitch, however the voice
was essentialy a mezzo-soprano.
Why are these incorrect classifications
allowed to go unchecked? Is the musical
world so tired of its artwork that it
can not cease this evil? Since when has it be-
come appropriate to categorise singing voices by
their vary and never by their timbre?
The totally inartistic and slovenly rendi-
tion of songs, and appallingly unfinished
strategy of a lot of the singers—the extra
appropriate phrase can be vocalists —that comes
over the air is sufficient to make the previous
masters of the bel canto writhe of their
graves. If this degradation of the artwork of
singing is being caused by radio it’s
time some drastic change was made that
will encourage real artistry amongst execu-
tants, and the behavior of listening-in on the
a part of lovers of actual singing.—Yours, and many others.,
Sydney. EDWARD PERIEJUN.
Giving Us a Dangerous Noise
Pricey Sir,—ln the “Security Valve” there has
appeared a number of letters the tone of which
means that the general public wants educating. One
letter went so far as to claim that the pub-
lic needs to be educated whether or not it needed to
be or not. Your correspondent says “that
there are sufficient ‘lowbrows’ in Australia to
make it a C Three nation.” I take nice excep-
tion to those statements, as a result of I really feel that
if persons are allowed to say issues like this
Australia will likely be getting a foul title. And.
at any fee, these statements are fairly un-
true. Australia’s customary of training is
higher than any on this planet. We now have
one of the best lecturers, one of the best faculties, and the
very latest programs. Greater than this, the
Australian individuals love liberty. I, as an
Australian, object to having training cram-
med down my throat by supercilious com-
mittees and artwork connoisseurs. In plain Aus-
tralian, I don’t need to be educated. I need
the information and the wi-fi options that
please me. It should take all of the jazz bands
in Sydney to make up for the lengthy, horrible
years I spent in school. —Yours, and many others.,
Melbourne. J • LESSING.
Be Honest!
Pricey Sir—Whether or not accidentally or not a
letter was printed (W.W. 28/12/28) from
Mr. A. L. Gunn—a person who has studied
historical past and who has discovered “that the general public
by no means is aware of what it needs, by no means has identified
what it needed, and by no means will know what
it needs.”
Mr. Gunn, acutely aware of his condescension,
speaks of “terrible bourgeois programmes,” pro-
grammes which, if revised and “concocted
as he suggests, would allow broadcasting to
“justify itself” and “guarantee an inventive stand-
ard to which the ignorant and uneducated
might rise!”
Allow us to study this suggestion. “The
individuals who run the broadcasting stations
ought to name within the recognised authorities in
all of the Arts, who would prepare programmes
of excessive inventive advantage which may very well be loved
by nicely, the general public who by no means know what
they need, the broadcasters who would have
the satisfaction of pleasing Mr. Gunn, and,
in fact, our personal humbug, the admitted
“intellectual” historian. Why, everyone would
be happy!
I don’t anticipate that it has ever occurred
to Mr. Gunn that even the broadcasters
typically spend spare moments arranging
programmes and even deciding on them.
Granted that their “lowbrow” tastes has led
them to placed on programmes of inadequate
inventive advantage to please our cultured and re-
fined “intellectual,” such a slight was not in-
tentional, and so they might have omitted even
the grave oversight of not pondering of him
in any respect.
No person would say that the programmes are
excellent, however Mr. Gunn ought to take into con-
sideration the truth that the annual 27/ (or
no matter it’s in Victoria, I presume he does
pay) for the upkeep of the station
wouldn’t go very far in the direction of paying “the
recognised authorities in all of the Arts.”
It’s not possible to please everyone; there
will all the time be some part of disgruntled
listeners, and so long as the discontented
ones are solely of the A. L. Gunn class the
broadcasters have a lot to be congratulated
on.
I’ll conclude by confiding that if the
author was honest a Gunn just isn’t the proper
weapon for exterminating “comedians, jazz
melodists, pseudo-classical singers, and box-
ing announcers,” a minimum of not in New South
Wales, —Yours, and many others.,
Blackheath. V. SHANE O’G.
‘7 Love Me!”
Pricey Sir, —Who’s the 2BL early morning
announcer? Little doubt his information are ex-
ceedingly nicely chosen, however I really feel positive thac
have been he to restrict himself to asserting the
names of things solely, the session can be far
extra gratifying. As a substitute now we have to take heed to
prolonged speeches, each earlier than and following
an merchandise, during which this explicit announcer
repeats himself in a most irritating style.
As an illustration; “I shall now pluy Chanson
Hindu’ (Track of India). Now a number of phrases
about this explicit merchandise. After I was m
India, serving King and nation,” and many others., and many others.,
and many others., and many others. And so he goes on —like a babbling
brook.
I’ve additionally observed that this announcer
differs from all others I’ve heard, in that
he makes his bulletins within the first
particular person. “I’ll now play.” By no means “we.”
Yours, and many others.,
“NON-EGOTIST ”
Manly.
Let It Be Quickly
Pricey Sir,—ln your paper some weeks again
there was an announcement to the impact that the
New South Wales Broadcasting Firm
would broadcast a non secular drama. I
haven’t heard this but, and I want they
would do it quickly; as a result of I’m positive the ex-
periment would show of nice curiosity.—
Yours, and many others.,
Rockhampton. L. MADDEN.
Winner
of the Silhouette
Competitors
The winner of the Silhouette Com-
petition is Mrs. Una Foster, 22 ‘St.
George’s Crescent, Drummoyne , who
despatched in essentially the most almost appropriate entry
within the opinion of the judges.
Entries obtained listening to a postmark:
dated later than January 31 weren’t
thought of, a,s copies of the next
week’s “Wi-fi Weekly’’ listening to the
key to the silhouettes have been obtainable on
that date.
Just one utterly appropriate entry
was obtained, hut this, sadly,
was unaccompanied hy the reader’s
title and deal with, and was thereto,
disqualified.
Mrs. Foster’s entry was appropriate in
virtually each explicit, naming all ar-
tists and numbers of their correct order.
Her solely fault was the naming of Mr.
Jules Van Der Klei as a substitute of Mr
Vincent Aspey because the fourth member
of the Instrumental Quartette.
Nearly all in any other case profitable en-
tries failed to call appropriately all 4
mem,hers of the quartette, many omit
ting them altogether. One other com-
mon error was the naming of Mr
James Donnelly’ as a substitute of Mr. Len.
Maurice because the whispering baritone of
the night.
A cheque for £>s has been forwarded
to Mrs. Una Foster.

P.14 – Financial Radio Shops[edit]

ALWAYS IN ACTION!
YOUR “A” BATTERY NEED NO LONGER
REMAIN UNCHARGED-
The
a ECO “A” battery Qharger
CAN BE PUT TOGETHER BY ANYONE IN ONE HOUR, AND DEFINITELY
WILL KEEP YOUR BATTERY IN ACTION
PARTS INCLUDED IN KIT
ARE
1 Transformer.
1 Eco New Metallic Rectifier Unit.
1 Baseboard.
1 Terminal Panel.
Three Marked Terminals.
2 Yards Twin Flex Wire.
1 Screw Base Holder for Rectifier Unit,
THE ECO “A” BATTERY
CHARGER KIT
Full with Instruction Sheet
mml 08HI m N° Failures.
Imm No Glass Bulbs.

Prices Four or 6 Volt Batteries at 2 Amperes.
Use the Eco “A” Charger in Conjuncton With the Financial
13 limmatov and Maks Youy Radio A ll m Elsctvic
THE SUPER R.F. PERIDYNE on this Concern
Listed below are Some Assured Elements to Construct It
A.W.A. Anti-vibration Sockets . . V. . . . . . . . . . 3/-
Emmco Anti-vibration Sockets . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/6
Bradleystats (for fine filament management) . . . , 9/6
Rheostats, U.S.L., 30 ohms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/6
Bypass Condensers, i mfd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4}!)
Airzone Sub-panel Brackets, pr. . . . . . . . . . . . 3/ 6
Philips Audio Transformers . ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . 27/6
Carborundurri Everlasting Detectors . . . . . . 11/-
Exhausting Rubber Panels, 24 x 7 x 3-l6 . . . … 8/6
Radiokes R.F.Chokes……………… 8/6
Pollocks R.F.Chokes 5/6
Emmco 3~gang Condensers . . . . . . . . . . . . £4/10/-
Pilot 3-gang Condenser, with double drum ‘
Dial £4/3/-
Diora Bakelite Vernier Dials . . . . . . . . . . 6/3
B.M.S. Single Circuit Filament Jack . . . . . . . . 2/6
Philips Screened Grid Valve, A442 . . . . . . . . 30/-
Yours for Decrease Costs and Service that Satisfies”
THE ECONOMIC RADIO STORES,
Deal with Mail Orders, 492 George Avenue, Sydney
ditionally thaPyour^o^ey 1 ‘ te^efu^ded’ 1 !? 0^^^ 11, noT Sfsfi’ed Ship your , orders to us con-
should be returned to us inside ten days. We Pav Carri aS In An L? e T °£?, UP ° n receipt ot similar – Items
specifically procured can’t be exchanged. Phrases Money ?f Zero low cost? d ° f *° ‘ and ° Ver ‘ ValvGS and g-oods
SYDNEY
25 New Royal Arcade,
close to
Palace Theatre.
’Cellphone, M 6138.
NEWCASTLE
1 Three Union Avenue,
. off
Hunter Avenue West.
’Cellphone, New. 1622.
PARRAMATTA
. (> – ‘
Nook Church and
Macquarie Streets.
’Cellphone, UW 9601
ORANGE
120 A Summer season Avenue.
’Cellphone, Orange 735,

P.15 – The Tremendous R.F. Peridyne[edit]

The Juber R.F.
PERIDYNE
By DON B. KNOCK
» (Affiliate Technical Editor).
The modernised model of the well-known Peridyne circuit, using the now well-known t
screen-grid valve to acquire superlative ends in the R.F. levels. The receiver
described right here tuned in all broadcasting stations inside affordable vary of Australia.
The panel association above illustrates the benefit of management obtained.
ALL keep in mind ‘‘THE GLOOMCHASER
FIVE,” the title I gave -to the ori-
ginal Peridyne within the columns of
“Wi-fi Weekly.” It was a well-
chosen title, and the receiver proved im-
mensely standard as a robust however easily-
managed distance getter. Later, within the
November subject (1928) of “Radio in Aus-
tralia and New Zealand,” the PERIDYNE, as
tailored to make use of screen-grid valves within the R.F.
levels, was described.
The outcomes obtained with
this circuit have been far su-
perior to the unique, and
the SUPER R.F. PERI-
DYNE holds a spot as a uni-
management receiver which is able to
outclass many extra compli-
cated receivers in perform-
ance. The standard of the re-
manufacturing obtained is of the
easiest, and this receiver,
used with a dynamic speaker,
is a type of uncommon instru-
ments catering for the person
who simply needs to show one
dial, and sit again, and revel in
musical programmes par ex-
cellence.
Our previous month-to-month journal,
•‘Radio to Australia and
New Zealand,” is now included in
“Wi-fi Weekly,” and it’s only becoming
that this wonderful receiver needs to be de-
scribed anew for individuals who weren’t sub-
scribers to the month-to-month journal. There may be
nothing difficult in its development, in
truth, it’s most likely the simplest of screen-grid
receivers to assemble. It has been pre-
sented in as easy a type as doable, with-
out recourse to any steel screening, though
those that might want to be wholly on the
protected facet might, with little or no further bother,
match the standard screening containers for the 2
Philips A 442 valves. This process just isn’t
by any means obligatory, because the coils them-
selves are adequately screened, and due pre-
warning has been taken within the structure to pre-
clude the potential of instability within the R.F.
amplifier.
The Peridyne is likely one of the few receivers
able to an distinctive efficiency with
excessive simplicity. It’s neither onerous nor
costly to construct, and has the good advan-
tage over‘many units of being
a really single management set.
The entrance panel look
is especially neat as a
consequence, and altogether
it’s a very fascinating
piece of equipment. On de-
ciding to transform the Peri-
dyne it was essential to con-
sider crucial
query first, particularly, the
technique of coupling the R.P.
valves. It was determined that
if straight tuned anode coup-
ling was employed, the pri-
mary of the Peridyne R.F.
transformers must
be uncared for, and different
difficulties would come up
in tuning preparations.
Alternatively, if the primaries
PARTS REQUIRED FOR TEE SUPER R.F. PERIDYNE
1 Bakelite panel, 2Jf x Eight x
3-16 in.
1 Bakelite sub-panel, 24 x
10 x 3-16 in.
1 pair Benjamin or Air-
zone sub-panel brac-
kets.
5 A.W.A. or Emmco anti-vi-
bration TJ.X. valve soc-
kets.
2 Bradleystats.
1 SO ohm. rheostat.
Four T.C.C. 1 mfd. by-pass
condensers.
5 Radiokes R.F. chokes.
1 Radiokes Peridyne coil
equipment.
1 Pilot or Emmco 3-gang
.0005 condenser unit.
1 Emmco V elm o vernier
dial.
1 Royalty 0-100,000 ohms.
variable resistance.
2 Philips’ transformers, or
2 Ferranti AFS transform-
ers.
1 carborundum everlasting
sort crystal detector.
1 mixture filament
and single circuit jack.
I .001 wetless sort B mounted
condenser.
II terminals.
1 30-volt B battery for C
biasing.
Wiring used, “Chromax.”
2 Philips’ AM® screen-grid
valves.
Valves as advisable in
article.

CAPABLE OF EXCEPTIONAL PERFORMANCE WITH
EXTREME SIMPLICITY
have been used, their impedance wouldn’t si
the excessive impedance of the screen-grid valve
But by appropriate by-passing capacities the
may very well be used, and it doesn’t matter what slig]
loss is likely to be current the nett outcome wou
be a significantly better efficiency than with th
unique three electrode association!
At this time interval now we have fairly a fe
sorts of screen-grid valves on the marke
to select from, and in an effort to maintain the re
ceiver as economical as doable, the no
well-known Philips A 442 sort was chosen
The A 442 was the primary of the screen-gri
valves to be launched to readers of “Radio
and was used within the “All Empire” short-wav
receiver. This valve is of the four-volt fila
ment sort, and could also be adopted by a de
tector and audio valves, having six-volt fila
ments if required. Many American author
state that this needs to be the case with an-
screen-grid valve, however as in Australia wi
are capable of procure British and European
4-volt valves with a excessive order of effectivity
relative to their sorts, we’re capable of design
a set utilizing two display grid R.P. amplifiers
detector, and two audio levels utilizing 4-vol
valves all through, and procure the very bes
m effectivity. There’s a very particular purpose
foi the statements made by these America]
writers. The amplification from one or two
levels of screen-grid R.F. working on the
most effectivity will utterly “para-
lyse” the atypical sort of detector valve
Which means that the detector valve will no
be capable to take care of the “grid swing,” o]
to go it on to the audio amplifiers to the
fullest benefit. An influence or super-power
sort of valve ought to all the time be used because the
detector; the traits of such a valve
rendering it very appropriate for this work. The
grid of the super-power valve requires a
gi eater excitation than typical, and this further
impulse is supplied by the screen-grid R.F.
amplifiers. Thankfully, now we have a large
vary of energy and super-power valves in
the 4-volt class, and this permits us to con-
struct a contemporary and extremely’ environment friendly re-
ceiver.
Those that have constructed and are utilizing the
Peridyne, as I described it in “Radio” for
April, 1928, will discover that this model requires
solely little or no alteration from the unique.
4 by-pass condensers, two radio fre-
quency chokes, and somewhat alteration of the
wiring, and the job is completed. After the ori-
ginal description, a bunch of queries got here to
hand, asking me if the condensers may very well be
used with separate controls, and why the
three .0001 bridging condensers have been positioned
throughout the ganged condenser unit. Firstly,
the .00035 ganged unit was the one one avail-
ready of the kind on the time, and because the complete
capability of the variable condensers was in-
ample to cowl your complete tuning vary of
the Radiokes Peridyne coils, I included the
.0001 mounted condensers to boost the wave-
size scale somewhat. Those that might have
met with bother from this supply ought to be aware
that it’s crucial that these three .0001
condensers are matched, and have precisely
the identical capability. There are such a lot of
cheaper makes of such condensers which
possess any however the appropriate capability. Do
not take it as a right that as a result of a little-
identified, low cost sort of mounted condenser is
marked .0001 microfarads that it’s! Fortu-
nately there are actually many makes of ganged
variable condensers of .0005 mfd. capability
obtainable, and for individuals who desire to construct
their very own there are condensers with move-
ready spindles, allowing prepared ganging.
As many readers nearly “took the legislation
into their very own arms” and disregarded the
ganging, utilizing separate tuning condensers,
I want to emphasise that by so doing it’s
defeating the article of the Peridyne shields
during which the coils are enclosed. If one de-
indicators a receiver, making use of a number of
levels of radio frequency amplification and
ganged condenser tuning management, then it’s
invariably obligatory to supply some type
of “trimming” or compensating capability, at
least for the primary R.F. stage. The one me-
thod whereby this can be pointless is
the place the coils and their related capaci-
ties are matched to a excessive diploma of accu-
racy. The Peridyne precept of balancing
the circuits introduces virtually no losses,
and is sort of distinctive and handy. Within the
unique Peridyne self-oscillation of the radio
frequency amplifiers was stored just under the
oscillation level via a “suppressor”
within the type of a variable resistance, having
a variation of from Zero to 100,000 ohms. The
Tremendous R.F. Peridyne nonetheless retains this fea-
ture, and lots of readers will without delay marvel
how that is utilised, because the screen-grid valve
is hailed far and vast as a self-neutralising
radio frequency amplifier. Simply so. The
screen-grid valve used as an R.F. amplifier
will oscillate like every other valve if given
plate and screening grid potentials barely
in extra of the proper worth.
Take a look at it from this standpoint: If we
use the Peridyne with screen-grid valves in
the R.F. levels we’re without delay positive to acquire
a higher total amplification earlier than the de-
tector, whether or not we introduce some type of
regeneration or not. That is, in fact> when
utilizing the proper voltages. Strictly talking,
the regeneration characteristic just isn’t actually essen-
tial for regular operation. The set is ex-
tremely highly effective, as we anticipate, however it’s
nonetheless a bonus to have the ability to find the
service wave of distant stations, particularly
by these static-laden evenings. Many
customers of radio receivers are completely misplaced un-
much less they’re first ready to select the car-
rier wave or whistle of a station, after which
do their tuning. By various the screen-grid
voltage on the R.F. valves, these amplifiers
■ could also be made to oscillate within the typical means
and the diploma of regeneration or self-oscilla-
tion simply managed with the variable re-
sistance as earlier than. Solely a small quantity of
sign energy will likely be misplaced on this means, and
regardless of this apparently round-about means of
doing issues, the achieve is much higher than is
doable with three electrode R.F. amplifiers
In case you have earlier than you the theoretical circuit
diagram of the Peridyne as described earlier than,
a comparability with the diagrams accompany-
ing this text will present the modifications
obligatory. The tuning preparations and
audio amplifier are essentially the identical
and though totally different parts are used!
doesn’t imply to say that your individual Peri-
dyne won’t work equally! We nonetheless re-
tain the Bradleystats mounted on the sub-
panel, though they aren’t actually so im-
portant in perform as they have been earlier than
Even so, they’re an excellent filament management’
The “B” voltages for the audio amplifier and
the R.F. amplifier plates are each fed from
the identical battery terminal. That is fairly in

ONLY SLIGHT ALTERATION FROM THE ORIGINAL
PERIDYNE
order, with screen-grid valves, and it’s possible you’ll
take it as -a rule each time these valves are
used that the plate voltage needs to be approxi-
mately the identical because the audio amplifier. As
earlier than the plate provide passes by
the first of every R.P. transformer
to the plate of the valve. The
screen-grid voltage is in every case handed
by a Radiokes R.P. choke to the
screening grid of every R.F. valve. Connec-
ted between the “B” optimistic facet of the pri-
maries are two 1 mfd. T.C.C. blocking con-
densers in collection to the screening grid. A
mid level connection is taken from the 2
condensers to “A” unfavorable and earth. This
technique of coupling the R.F. levels is absolutely
environment friendly, and guidelines out the need for re-
designing the Radiokes Peridyne primaries.
It’s most likely even a extra steady technique
of coupling than via a excessive impe-
dance main alone. Within the case of the R.P.
Peridyne receiver prompting this text, it
was an experiment attended by success, and
will allow those that so want to make the
requisite alterations simply. Within the diagram
the blocking condensers are marked C Four and
5, and C 6 and seven. The radio frequency chokes
should not be omitted within the screen-grid leads,
or it’s possible you’ll anticipate bother from uncontroll-
ready instability.
The crystal detector stays. Many readers
wrote to me and stated that they acquired higher
outcomes by eradicating the crystal and changing
with a grid condenser and leak. This reveals
instantly that the valve used behind the
crystal was of the flawed sort or defective. If
you have been to put two receivers facet by facet,
one a Peridyne, working as a Peridyne
ought to, and the opposite virtually a Peridyne,
apart from the grid condenser and leak in-
troduction, the Peridyne can be a simple
winner.
The carborundum crystal detector is of ex-
treme significance on this circuit. Within the first
place it should be used with an appropriate valve,
and, secondly, it is going to positively solely behave
because it ought to when related the fitting means
spherical within the circuit. It’s unlucky that
not each carborundum detector it appropriate
for the use demanded of it in .he Peridyne.
For that reason it might be essential to strive
corridor a dozen till you stumble on the one you
need. Sellers carry massive shares of those
explicit crystal detectors in Sydney, and
little question your vendor is tolerant, as most are,
and would enable you to to search out the fitting crystal
for the job.
Now to think about the development of the
set. The images will present that the lay-
out is totally different to the unique. Do you assume
that that is materially essential. Your re-
vamped Peridyne will work simply as nicely. The
structure of the Tremendous R.P. Peridyne illustrated
right here was purely a private matter. On the
similar time, it’s a very handy arrange-
ment, and will attraction to those that de-
cide to construct up such a set. This ssfc was
constructed up totally in bakelite. Sheets of bake-
lite have been reduce to the scale required in order to
completely enclose the entire set in a cupboard of
this materials. That is solely talked about in
passing. Readers will solely require the panel
and sub-panel dimensions. The primary two
Peridyne models are on the left, wanting on the
receiver from inside. Adjoining are the re-
spective screen-grid valves, with the 2
Bradleystats in between. One of many T.C.C.
by-pass condensers could also be seen on the left,
and one other one is out of sight in entrance of
the second R.P. valve, owing to the angle at
which the set was photographed. The opposite
two condensers are mounted conveniently
beneath the sub-panel, with the 2 R.F.
chokes within the screen-grid leaks. The again
of panel diagram ought to clear up any doubt
as to the place of parts. The tun-
ing condenser unit is of the straight ganged
sort. .Every condenser has a capability of .0005
mfd. To keep away from any confusion this capability
needs to be used, but when you have already got a
Peridyne utilizing a decrease capability bridged by
the mounted condensers, and it’s working nicely,
this will likely be appropriate.
There are, fortuitously, many makes of
ganged condenser models now obtainable on the
market, and in addition many makes of condensers
during which the shafts could also be eliminated to en-
ready ganging. Emmco now make a wonderful
three-gang unit, which is simply the factor for
this work. The unit used on this R.P. Peri-
dyne is a Pilot. These Pilot condensers are
of the brand new sort, sturdy, and of very easy
motion. The Peridyne unit coupling the sec-
ond R.P. valve to the detector is located on
the fitting of the tuning condensers, with the
detector valve and the crystal behind. I
ought to probably not confer with this valve because the
detector, as it’s truly an audio amplifier
in impact. Readers are accustomed to look
upon the third valve in a receiver similar to
this because the detector, so this reference will
assist to keep away from confusion. Simply to the fitting of
the detector is the Radiokes R.P. choke in
the first circuit of the primary audio trans-
former, and the by-pass condenser CB. This
condenser has a capability of .001 mfd. A
misprint within the unique Peridyne article
confirmed it as .0001. Such a capability would
be far too small to be of any ise right here. In
the {photograph} the primary audio transformer
is hidden by two grid bias batteries mounted
above in a small container. It’s extra con-
venient to rearrange the “C” batteries like this,
however I’m displaying the standard “C” battery ter-
minal connections within the circuit diagrams
as larger “C” voltages are fascinating. The
second audio transformer could also be seen in
between the 2 audio valves. Each the
transformers on this set are the well-known
Philips.
These transformers are fantastically com-
pact, and on the similar time extremely environment friendly.
Different good transforers could also be used, however the
reader should perceive that they should be
good. Two Ferranti AFs’s are, as an illustration,

SET IS POWERFUL AND SCREEN GRID VALVES
MAKE IT SELECTIVE
nicely price inclusion in such a set because the
0llM „ w -p ■ Por i,i vr ,p Tnprranti AF”i
Tremendous R.F. Peridyne. The Ferranti AFS is
a well-designed, sturdy transformer, massive m
measurement, and the identical in quantity. No atypical
use the common reader will give such trans-
formers will ever harm them, and they’re
. – ~ .. „ A
good all the time. A 30 ohm rheostat con-
trols the filament of the detector valve. This
is mounted on the panel on the right-hand
facet of the tuning management The Royalty var-
i«hiP mirfonro is on the left The entrance of
lable resistance is on the e t. e o
the panel presents the identical look as
earlier than, with the exclusion of a filament
change. As a substitute, a mixture filament jack
is used for the loud-speaker output. When
the speaker is plugged in, the filaments are
robotically switched on. The vernier dial
proven within the pictures is likely one of the
Emmco De Luxe sort. That is fairly a great
dial, however readers are suggested to strive the brand new
Emmco Velmo Dial now available on the market. The
title “Veimo” might be derived from a
“velvet vernier,” and, in that case, was aptly chosen.
To begin development of this Tremendous R.F.
Peridyne, first get hold of a bakelite panel and
sub-panel, with a set of Benjamin or Air-
zone sub-panel brackets. The panel mea-
sures 24 x Eight in., and the sub-panel 24 x 10 in.
The drilling diagram will present the place the
panel should be marked off for the controls.
If you mount the 2 panels, use coun-
tersunk-headed screws for the bracket
mounting on the entrance panel, and provides the
heads a contact with a brush dipped in black
lacquer. It doesn’t look good to see a easy
bakelite panel dotted with yellow brass screw
heads. In fact, in case you are an engineer, you
might drill the panel from behind, not permitting
the drill to run by, and faucet the holes
to take small studs, afterward locking up the
brackets via the nuts as typical.
Now, with regard to the wiring. All low
frequency wiring is run beneath the sub-
panel, and is completed largely in 16-gauge tinned
copper. A higher issue of security will outcome
if wiring similar to “Chromax’s” is used. This
wire is 16-gauge tinned copper, supplied with
an insulating protecting made in varied
colours. A field containing small coils of all
the colours equipped could also be obtained from
most sellers in Sydney. One other good make
of wire is “Glazite.” which could be very related.
Alternatively, it’s possible you’ll use your trustworthy
“spaghetti” to cowl the standard 16’s. Attend
to the filaments first —all the time one of the simplest ways!
Be part of up the A unfavorable, B unfavorable, and C
optimistic terminals on the again of the sub-
panel. These three are widespread. Run a lead
to the unfavorable filament terminals of the
two audio valve sockets, one facet of CB, R 4,
R 3, Rl, R 2, the F terminals of every Peridyne
unit E terminal of the primary, and to the earth
terminal of the set.
Subsequent join condensers C Four and C 5 to-
gether, and from the connection between the
two be a part of to “A” unfavorable additionally. Do the identical
with C 6 and C 7. Because the rotor plates of the
full ganged condenser tuning unit are
widespread, these are subsequent joined to the “A”
unfavorable. It is going to be observed that no filament
resistances are used for the audio valves. A
four-volt provide is used for the receiver, and
four-volt valves these days are made to face
the complete voltage, and don’t usually require
any voltage regulator resistances for audio
work significantly. In the event you really feel doubtful about
this, put them ih by all means, however make
positive you get hold of the fitting sort for the valves
used. Now we come to the A optimistic sup-
ply. Merely from the A optimistic terminal
on the sub-panel and thru the filament
facet of the jack to the optimistic filament ter-
minals of every valve socket. Now work from
starting to finish of the set and join ter-
minal A of the primary coil unit to the aerial
terminal on the sub-panel. Terminal G of
this unit is joined to the grid terminal of the
first valve socket and to the stator plates of
Cl. Deal equally with the second coil and
be a part of terminal G to the grid of the second
valve, and the stator plates of C 2. The opposite
facet of the variable resistance R 1 additionally hyperlinks
up right here. The third coil has its terminal G
related first to the stator of C Three and to 1
facet of the carborundum crystal detector D,
with the opposite facet to the grid valve of the
third valve. The plate connection from the
Philips A 442 screen-grid valve, as readers
ought to know by now, is the terminal on the
prime of the valve cap.
Connection should be made to this by means
of a brief size of flex wire, similar to “Celat-
web site,” with a soldering tab hooked up. The tab
is screwed down beneath the pinnacle of the ter-
minal. Join the opposite finish of this flex
lead for the primary R.F. valve to terminal P of
the second Peridyne unit, and the lead for the
second R.F. valve to terminal P of the third
Peridyne unit. Be part of terminals B of the primary
two coil models collectively, and proceed to the
terminal on the sub-panel for B optimistic R.F.
minal on the sub-panel for B optimistic R.F,
and audio. A lead can also be run from this ter-
minal to 1 facet of the jack output (the

DEMONSTRATES SUPERIORITY OF TETRODE
OVER TRIODE AS R.F. AMPLIFIER
different to the plate of the final valve) and to
terminal B of the second audio transformer.
Join the opposite facet of C 5 to B of the
second coil, and the opposite facet of C 7 to B
of the third coil unit. Subsequent is the screen-
grid circuits.
Because the plate of the Philips A 442 valve is
related from the highest of the valve itself,
the terminal on the valve socket which might
usually be the plate of every other valve is
used for the screening grid. The connections
contained in the valve are, in fact, wired on this
means. Run a lead from the B optimistic screen-
grid terminal on the sub-panel to 1 facet of
the 2 Radiokes R.F. chokes RFC Three and
RFC 2. Join the opposite facet of RFC Three to the
different facet of C 6, and proceed from right here to
the P terminal of the second valve socket.
Deal equally with RFC 2. and be a part of the opposite
facet of this to C 4, and in addition to terminal P of
the primary valve socket.
Subsequent we go alongside to the audio frequency
facet of the receiver. The plate of the third
valve is related to 1 facet of RFCI and
CB, with the opposite facet of RFCI to terminal
P of the primary audio transformer. Terminal
B of this transformer main is joined to the
B optimistic D terminal on the sub-panel for
the detector B voltage. Impartial grid
biasing is supplied, and is critical for the
two audio levels, in order that C unfavorable of the
first transformer goes to C unfavorable 1 and C
unfavorable of the second to C unfavorable 2. A
completely simple wiring job and never
in any respect troublesome.
So you’ve got accomplished the wiring of the
Tremendous R.F. Peridyne, and also you are actually natur-
ally impatient to know what will be the
results of your labors with soldering iron and
pliers. You ask: “What valves am Ito use?
An important query for such a re-
ceiver. Initially, the Philips A442’s are
four-volt valves, and by appropriate selection we
might use valves with the identical filament volt-
age all through. Please, Mr. Reader, do
not go and insert a wonderfully good set of
four-volt valves on this receiver, after which
put a six-volt accumulator throughout the lot. If
you’ve got solely a six-volt accumulator helpful,
you should definitely take the required tapping, leav-
ing one cell idle. You wouldn’t be capable to
see any seen indication of injury with
glowless filaments, however it might be achieved simply
the identical, and whenever you discover the error
and use the 4 volts required it’s sure
that the valves could have misplaced most, if not all,
of their utility. The place readers are liable
to make such errors, amperites are cer-
tainly important. Forewarned is forearmed!
The next mixtures of valves are
equally good, and have been efficiently utilized in
the exams of the Tremendous R.F. Peridyne, Of
course, the A442’s have been used with all; —
Ist mixture:
Ist 2nd
Detector. Audio. Audio.
Philips 8409 8403 8405
At 120 volts plate provide the unfavorable bias
on the 8403 is 20 volts and 9 on the 8405.
2nd mixture:
Ist 2nd
Detector. Audio. Audio.
Mullard PM6 PM6 PM256
At 120 volts plate provide the unfavorable bias
on the PM6 is 12 volts, and on the PM256
20 volts.
third mixture:
Ist 2nd
Detector. Audio. Audio.
Cossor .. 410Pstentor. 410LF. 410 P stentor.
At 120 volts plate provide the unfavorable bias
on the 410LF is 6 volts and on the 410 P 9
volts.
4th mixture:
Ist 2nd
Detector. Audio. Audio.
Six Sixty SS4IOP SS4IOP SS 4255 P
At 120 volts plate provide the unfavorable bias
on the SS 410 P is 9 volts and 20 on the
SS 4255 P.
sth mixture:
Ist 2nd
Detector. Audio. Audio.
Osram DEP-410 DEL-410 DEP-410
Damaging bias with 120 volts on the plate
is! 4i on the DEL-410 and 9 on the DEP-
-410.
The reader will see that he has a bunch of
valves to select from. The mixtures
given right here have been truly tried, and in every
case the selection was wonderful. Most who
constructed the unique Peridyne know what an
extraordinary good efficiency it’s succesful
of, and people who do that new model will
realise without delay the advantages of the screen-
grid valves.
One level I’ve not talked about till now:
I attempted a Philips 8443 Penthode audio am-
The
Display-grid
Tetrode.
plifier within the final stage. This valve is of the
sort used within the “Ultimax” receiver described
final month. All that’s obligatory to make use of it’s
an additional “B” battery connection. The quantity
from 3LO was similar to to threaten the protection
of the Ferranti Exponential speaker I used to be
utilizing for the take a look at. A Ferranti OPI output
transformer overcame that bother. Though
I’ve not proven an output transformer
with this receiver, it’s a good plan to make use of
one with any receiver which is able to
delivering heavy quantity. The Ferranti OPI
is a 1 to 1 ratio transformer, which safe-
guards the speaker windings by holding
direct present confined to the set. The 8443
was solely tried on this Tremendous R.F- Peridyne
to see what would occur. It could be
extra appropriate if just one stage was used
with a 8443, however because the receiver stands it
delivers extra quantity if required than the
common listener will ever need.
The subsequent take a look at was to make use of a MAQNAVOX
Dynamic reproducer, and for this objective a
Ferranti 25 to 1 ratio OP2 transformer was
used for the output to the reproducer. By no means
have I heard higher replica wherever
than with this mix used with the
Tremendous R.F. Peridyne.
Quantity just isn’t the slogan to-day, however
“QUALITY”! The Tremendous R.F. Peridyne will
provide you with these distant stations with ample
punch, and a most exceptional readability of
quantity. None apart from the carborundum
sort of crystal will swimsuit.
In conclusion, the set was not fairly so sel-
ective in my testing location, near 2BL,
as I ought to have appreciated, however solely a good dis-
tance away and the difficulty will disappear.
It may very well be rendered utterly selective by
sufficient screening; however as nearly all of
readers don’t, like myself, use their re-
ceivers in shut proximity to a robust
station, the query is one in every of secondary
significance.
The set is price constructing, and as soon as once more
demonstrates the prevalence of the screen-
grid Tetrode over the Triode as a radio fre-
quency amplifier.
A variation of the screen-grid voltage from
70 to 90 volts will give the oscillation re-
quired within the R.F. amplifier, afterwards
checking up with the variable resistance.
Usually, this management could also be left set, and
the tuning dial rotated, bringing in native
and distant stations with virtually equal in-
tensity.
By together with a LEWCOS customary wave-
entice in collection with the aerial lead, and tun-
ing this to 2BL, there was not the slightest
hint of background from 2BL, whereas 3LO
was romping in as if native.
Since this Tremendous R.F. Peridyne appeared
within the pages of “Radio in Australia and New
Zealand,” I’ve discovered {that a} considerably
higher management of regeneration could also be ef-
fected by leaving RI (Zero to 100,000 ohms) out,
and by introducing a “losser” or grid suppres-
sor management. Mount as a substitute a 50,000 to 500,000
ohms Royalty variable resistance on the panel
as a substitute of RI, and join this in collection
with the grid of the second R.F. valve in-
stead of from the grid to A unfavorable, as with
RI. With the previous technique of management the
energy of the service wave was significantly
decreased as oscillation ceased, however with the
grid suppressor technique, the service wave re-
mains fixed in energy, with the outcome
that the modulated sign is amplified extra
absolutely owing to the truth that the screen-grid
valves are working with solely a slight re-
tarding impact.

P.20 – Hitting beneath the Broadcast Belt[edit]

HITTING BELOW the BROADCAST BELT (Quick-wave and Newbie Notes by VK2NO)

Issues are wanting up. Regardless that we’re within the midst of Summer season there have been one or two of these unimaginable days and nights when the “inexperienced satan” has been chased away (most likely to plot future static campaigns), and a silent background has been in proof over the dials of short-wave receivers. One by no means is aware of what will occur, for the easy purpose that one doesn’t know what governs the presence of static. There are events throughout our superb Australian Summer season (and Winter) when the sky is fantastically clear and the celebs cling like glittering pendants within the silence of the quiet evenings. The kookaburras might snort up there within the timber simply as in the event that they know precisely what you’ll get whenever you don the headphones — essentially the most appalling of frying scorching crashes of static! There is just one factor to do. Put the headphones down, change off, and exit and neglect it. A really dry air is normally the reason for such atmospheric bother. Just lately, nevertheless, now we have had one or two sensible evenings virtually totally free from atmospherics, and a search across the dials dropped at mild sundry service waves free from interference, and a medley of Australian experimenters attempting out their new 42-metre band.

RADIO PARIS AGAIN.
On the night of December 22, at 6 o’clock
Sydney time, the Radio Paris station was so
robust on 24.5 metres that I believed it might
make an excellent relay. Switching on a broad-
solid receiver I discovered our enterprising Ray
Allsop busy on the job, giving the French
colony of Sydney a deal with in their very own
language direct from the Paris studio,
by 2BL.
W2XAF is pretty robust cn 31.Four metres at
9 a.m. Sydney time on Tuesday, Wednesday,
Friday, and Sundays. The speech is somewhat
troublesome to comply with, however the musical objects
fairly clear. The opposite morning I listened to
an outline of a soccer match by
W2XAF, from the Brooklyn Navy Yard
floor. The announcer’s description of
the match and the yells of the cheer leaders
have been simply adopted.
GSSW is now a lot stronger within the morn-
ings and the evenings, and this station an-
nounces a change in schedule. They may
begin the night programme :n London at
7 on Fridays, which is 5 a.m. in Sydney.
This may give Australian listeners an oppor-
tunity of listening to the 7 o’clock cl’.imes of “Huge
Ben,” adopted by the primary basic information
bulletin. There may be your probability to start out off
for the early morning’s surf together with your head
filled with the most recent European information upfront
of your morning newspaper.
“SLOVOE RUSSKOE.”
I went up the dimensions at Eight on Thursday
night, December 27, and heard our previous
buddy, RFM in Siberia, on 70 metres yarning
away in “Slovoe Russkoe.” Often his
music was wonderful, and he appears to inter-
sperse the programme with Moise classes.
Though I’ve not heard them myself, I
perceive that 3LO, Melbourne, are occa-
sionally utilizing 75 metres in addition to 32 metres
It is going to be fascinating to know if they’re
heard in Europe on 75 metres as within the days
of yore in Australian newbie radio, I nicely
remeiriber Max Howden i3BQ) placing over
excellent telephony to Mr. Simmonds
(G2OD) in 1924 within the neighborhood cf 85 metres.
Energy was low and energy good, in order that
it follows {that a} trendy quick wave broad-
casting station stands a great probability of being
nicely heard.
A brand new station has accomplished exams, and is
able to open up on 16.95 metres. That is
VCD, Suva. VCD has been testing with
2ME, Sydney, on varied wave lengths pre-
viously.
POLL is busy at current on 18.Four metres, and
the energy and modulation of this station
are equal to that of PCJJ. PCLL might usually
be heard working duplex telppbony with
ANE, in Java. ANE could also be discovered on 15.93
metres. At 9 p.m. December 27 Radio Palis
was phenomenal in energy, and it was
actually onerous to imagine that the station was
truly located in Europe.
5SW MORSE INTERFERENCE.
SSW was additionally fairly robust on the similar
time, and these two stations would put coronary heart
into essentially the most sceptical of short-wave listen-
ers on this event. It’s annoying to comply with
diligently the constructional particulars of a
trendy short-wave receiver from a technical
article, and upon testing it out, discover nothing
however a medley of Morse indicators. These Morse
indicators are the sweetest of music to these
who perceive them, however -to the person wno
has spent his radio life with speech and
music they’re discord. As a widely known
statesman stated in 1915 —“Wait and see.”
I discovered a well-recognized station again together with his
monotonous studying classes the opposite even-
ing. This was W2XG, Rocky Level, New
York. His wave size was 27 metres, and
he was busy with the identical previous phrase take a look at
as within the early days: “Put down this; put
down that.” I’m wondering how he would fare
if he requested listeners to place down Llanfair-
Llanfairpwllygwnygogerychwrndrobwyllantis-
iliogogogoch, the title of a widely known little
Welsh village on the opposite facet of the Menai
Straits? I didn’t lookup the dictionary, so
any Welsh readers should forgive me.
KDKA TRANSMISSION.
One station I’ve not but recognized my-
self on about 25.Four metres seems to be the
world-famous KDKA. This was the primary
short-wave telephony station I ever heard in
my radio profession. That was on 63 metres in
1923, and KDKA nonetheless makes use of the identical wave
size. He’s usually fairly robust right here on
63 metres, and it’s price whereas making a
particular spare coil for him if obligatory.
On Tuesday, December 24, I picked up a
service wave at 9 p.m. Sydney time, which,
though I’m not ready o swear it, re-
solved itself into “JB, Johannesburg, South
Africa.” It was fairly a pressure to make out
precisely what the announcer was saying, and
until it was a particular take a look at I’ve my doubts,
as this time corresponds with 1 a.m. in Jo-
hannesburg. Moreover, South African
experimental transmitters are hardly ever heard
right here earlier than Three a.m. Sydney time on tele-
graphy.
32 METRES DESERTED.
The 32 metres band is abandoned sa far
as Australian experimental transmitters are
involved. They’re all to be discovered on 42
metres or spherical about, and so these inter-
nationwide short-wave telephony stations who
appear to congregate across the 32-metre re-
gion could have a transparent run. A lot of the ex-
perimental indicators to be heard on 42 are
crystal managed, which is a most fascinating
characteristic. But lam of the opinion that our
newbie “bible,” QST, the official organ of
the American Radio Relay League, is much too
optimistic in regards to the preservation of interna-
tional two-way communication when the
entire world of experimental stations is
hopelessly jumbled up in a ridiculously nar-
row frequency. The “haras” will discover a means,
however, as I’ve stated earlier than, it will likely be solely by
the diligent use of the 20-metre band.
BYRD TRANSMISSION.
The experimental world is m
the Byrd Expedition to the Antarctic, and
many short-wave listeners are unaware that
once they hear a penetrating musical Morse
sign within the neighborhood of 34 metres they might
be listening to the transmissions of messages
from the “Metropolis of New York” and the “Elea-
nor Bolling” down on the ice barrier. We
wrote to the Superintendent, Radio Division
of the American Naval Analysis Laboratories
for data concerning transmissions con-
cerning the Byrd Expedition, ai d Dr. Hoyt
Taylor’s reply is given right here tor the profit
of Australasian experimental station opera-
tors: —
“I remorse to say that I’m unable to present
you the data you request in very defi-
nite type, as a result of we make so many adjustments
each in transmitted frequences and in hours
of operation as we’re primarily an experi-
psychological station.
“We now have, nevertheless, high-power transmit-
ters geared up to transmit on the next
particular frequencies, though they might be
adjusted to different frequencies on very quick
discover, certainly: 4435 kcs., 8370 kcs., 17,740 kcs.,
20,004 kcs. We even have a average energy
transmitter on 54.000 kcs.
“Most likely of explicit curiosity to you’ll
be our current work with the Byrd Antarctic
Expedition. We now have simply completed a schedule
with them this morning at 10 o’clock our
time, utilizing 17,740 kcs. They’re approxi-
mately 200 miles off the coast of New Zea-
land. They’ve been utilizing for many of
their communications with us 16.450 kcs.
When one considers that their transmissions
to us cowl almost 7000 miles in daylight, and
that they solely have a comparatively low energy
transmitter on the ‘Eleaner Bolling,’ the per-
formance is fairly uncommon. These schedules
will most likely be continued so long as we’re
capable of maintain them after they go away Dunedin.
“For some appreciable time now the
schedule has been began at 1400 GMT, and
is normally concluded by 1700 GMT. It usually
occurs, nevertheless, that each the ‘Eleanor
Bolling” and our personal station go to the 20,000
kc. band, though the schedule is normally
opened on 17,740 kcs. on our half and 16,450
kcs. on the a part of the ‘Eleanor Bolling.’
We frequently work the ‘Metropolis of New York’ on
related frequencies. It’s doable that these
schedules will likely be shifted to- considerably earlier
hours because the ‘Eleanor Bolling’ strikes south-
ward from New Zealand, and it is usually pos-
sible that extra work will likely be achieved within the
20,000 kc’. band than decrease. The ‘Eleanor
Bolling’ additionally has schedules with varied sta-
tions within the 9000 kc. band for evening work, however
this Laboratory is primarily occupied with
long-haul daylight work, and, subsequently, does
not ordinarily participate in such schedules.

Once we will we are probably to make use of the fre-
quency 8870 kcs. *
“We now have had many very fascinating re-
ports from New Zealand amateurs, and have
discovered them all the time prepared to co-operate in
exams of scientific curiosity coping with wave
propagation phenomena. Regretting that we
can not provide you with extra particular schedules, and
hoping what data I’ve introduced
will likely be of some curiosity to you.—Yours, and many others.,
“A HOYT TAYLOR.
“Naval Analysis Laboratory,
“Anacostia, D.C.”
Co-operation by Amateurs in Assessments
By F. R. LEPPARD.
WIRELESS amateurs will likely be particu-
larly within the booklet pub-
lished by 3LO containing a report of
static and fading exams performed by
the Broadcasting Firm of Australia in
conjunction with the Wi-fi Institute, dur-
ing February and March, 1928. The report
could be very invaluable in lots of respects, containing
because it does the primary full assertion of any
organised observations regarding reception
from broadcasting stations.
The wi-fi amateurs will likely be specifically in-
terested within the truth of the co-operation
which was availed of by the Broadcasting
Firm. The exams couldn’t have been
carried out with out the co-operation of the
amateurs, and the outcomes point out the worth
of the companies of skilled experimenters
all through the totally different States. Owing to
the peculiar nature of broadcast transmission,
it’s important in any exams that a big num-
ber of observers be pressed into the service,
and, in fact, a broadcasting firm or
every other organisation couldn’t contem-
plate making simultaneous observations at
distant factors by its personal emlpoyees. That is
the place the wi-fi amateurs fitted into the
scheme of the exams and their co-operation
has been acknowledged by the Broadcasting
Firm and by Professor Laby, who, as
the techcnical adviser to 3LO, exercised a
basic supervision of the experiments.
One naturally wonders why the companies
of amateurs are usually not extra availed of by offi-
cial and business our bodies. The institute
has often supplied the companies of its
members to the Defence Division, within the
hope that their companies may very well be made use
of in different instructions. In the US
as an illustration, the American Radio Relay
League recurrently co-operates with the mili-
tary authorities, and the league members are
thought to be an essential unit within the De-
fence reserves.
Equally, in Australia, the alternatives
for such official and technical co-operation
have introduced themselves, and if the De-
fence Division doesn’t take benefit
of the dear support supplied it will likely be no fault
of the Wi-fi Institute. Latest remarks
by senior officers of the Defence Division
would point out that such co-operation • is
more likely to be inaugurated, and that the ama-
teurs will turn out to be extra helpful in a nationwide
sense by giving their voluntary companies to
official organisations or business wi-fi
pursuits who’re able to make use
of the help that amateurs can render,
each in receiving and transmitting.
Gunnedah Relay
We welcome to the ranks of the experimental stations of Australia station VK2MO, owned and operated by Oliver Bros., the well-known radio sellers of Gunnedah. VK2MO is operating on the 200 metre waveband on low energy telephony, and is doing significantly good work on this path. Static troubles are at instances so dangerous in Gunnedah that Mr. Marcus Oliver resorts to an underground aerial used together with a screen-grid R.F. receiver, and relays the transmission from Sydney stations, in order that even the native crystal listener is catered for. Congratulations, VK2MO.

Tags: 2NO – Donald Brader Knock, Static, 40 Metres, 2MO – Marcus Oliver

P.21 – Gibson, Battle & Co Advert[edit]

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(Off Wentworth Avenue)
’Cellphone: M 2771-2-3.

P.22 – Proving Radio![edit]

PROVING
RADIO!
1W A Zero Elementary experiments
iIV» O with static electrical energy—
which is obvious in a single type as at-
mospheric interference, we suppose.
Static electrical energy is the earliest
identified type of that mysterious power
behind radio, and this text—the
third of the collection for novices—
takes you again to the primary electrical
experiments
LAST week I advised you the best way to make a
Leyden jar. Sadly, the me-
thod of charging this jar was omitted,
so it’s printed right here.
Earlier than the Leyden jar can be utilized, it should
be charged. That is a simple matter with an
electrophorus, described in Half Two of
“Proving Radio.” Maintain the electrophorus in
your left hand (thus grounding it), after which
maintain the charged cowl to the wire that leads
to and is related with the within of the jar.
as proven in Fig. 1. Do that a number of instances,
and the Leyden jar will likely be nicely charged. Do
not neglect to impress the electrophorous
first, within the method described in Half 2.
Fig. 1
A discharger could also be produced from a bit
of stout copper wire, fitted with a wood
deal with, as proven in Fig. 2. To discharge
the jar, place it on a desk, and place one
finish of the discharger into contact with the
outdoors coating of the jar, and convey the
different finish near the wire of the Leyden jar.
Immediately there will likely be a flash and a crack.
That is lightning and thunder on a small
scale.
( Now proceed with the opposite experiments
outlined in Half 2, first recharging the jar.
While the cell described final week will
trigger a present to move, it rapidly turns into
polarized, and this reduces the move of cur-
lease quickly after the circuit is closed. That is
as a result of formation of gasoline bubbles on the
carbon rod, which prevents the answer from
appearing on it. (Listeners who use accumu-
Fig. 2
lators for “A” battery provide will respect
this.)
Now, if sal-ammoniac answer have been used
for the moist cell described in final subject, you
can enhance issues by putting loz. of man-
ganese dioxide in a muslin sack about lin.
diameter, and almost so long as the carbon
rod. Place the bag spherical it, as proven in
Fig. 3. Place the 2 rods into the paste-
board help. That is referred to as the “’aspect.’
Now substitute the aspect into the electrolyte,
and the cell is prepared to be used. Sulphuric
acid could also be used for an electrolyte, but when
that is achieved, first amalgamate the zinc rod,
i.e., rub the rod with some weak sulphuric
acid to chop off the grease, then rub with
mercury till the rod is totally coated.
Bear in mind, that ALWAYS, the zinc rod is
unfavorable, and the carbon rod is optimistic. This
is the case with batteries purchased in retailers
additionally.
It’s doable to make a dry cell fairly
cheaply, although it stands to purpose that the
ready-made battery is extra environment friendly for pre-
cision and radio work. Don’t let this state-
ment deter you from making a cell, nevertheless,
as sensible instruction is critical should you
want to proceed these classes until you’re
proficient sufficient to begin your A.O.P.C.
course.
Make a cup of zinc 2in. in diameter, and
6in. excessive. This not solely serves as a con-
tainer, but in addition acts as an lively steel, and
is a part of the cell, i.e., the unfavorable ter-
minal.
You’ll need your piece of carbon rod.
Drill a gap on this, about lin. from the highest,
and mount a terminal right here. Subsequent solder
a terminal to the highest of the zinc cup.
Now combine lib. of zinc oxide, lib. zinc chlor-
ide, lib. sal-ammoniac, ilb. oxide of mangan-
ese, and 31b. plaster of paris, till they’re
completely dry, then work right into a easy paste
with somewhat water. Put sufficient of this “ac-
tive materials” into the cup to make a layer
2 inches deep, then maintain the carbon rod in
the centre of ; the cup (don’t let the rod
contact the underside of the cup), and pack the
Fig. 3
remainder of the combination spherical it. This achieved,
pour on some scorching pitch or sealing wax, as
it will seal the highest of the cell, and pre-
vent the air attending to the paste, and it’ll
additionally maintain the carbon rod in place. A cross
part of the cell is proven in Fig. 4.
To boost the voltage (every cell provides 14-
2 volts) a number of cells needs to be related to-
gether in collection, i.e., with the unfavorable ter-
minal of the primary cell related to the posi-
tive of the following, and so forth. The resultant
voltage is the same as a sum of the voltages.
See Fig. 5.
A present of electrical energy, like a present of
water, has amount and stress. The quan-
tity of electrical energy that flows in a circuit is
measured by the ampere, and therefore the
amount is named the amperage; whereas like-
sensible, the stress is measured by the volt,
and stress of electrical energy is named voltage.
The quantity of amperage a cell of any
sort will ship relies upon totally upon the
space of the zinc and copper components of
which it’s fashioned, whereas the stress or
voltage will depend on the variety of cells
used. If a higher amperage is required, the
cells needs to be related in parallel—see
Fig. 6. On this case, all of the unfavorable ter-
minals are related collectively, and a com-
mon lead taken to unfavorable, and all of the
optimistic terminals are related, and a com-
mon lead taken off for the optimistic faucet.
Fig. 4
There are two sorts of dynamos. That
which delivers A.C. (alternating present) is
termed an alternator, while D.C. (direct cur-
lease) turbines are termed dynamos. Ac-
tually it’s incorrect to say that dynamos
and alternators generate a present, as a result of
the present is already there, and it’s only
precipitated to maneuver by the dynamo or alterna-
tor. Nonetheless, the expression is used so
usually, that readers will likely be sensible to recollect
that the assertion is misguided. You’ll
perceive this higher in a while. In the event you de-
sire to make use of a dynamo (which is able to fit your
necessities higher than an alternator), ob-
tain one which delivers 12 volts at 24 am-
peres (30 watts).
The distinction between A.C. and D.C. is
that the previous has no evident polarity. The
Fig. 5

path of move in alternating present is
altered roughly 60 instances per second.
In different phrases, there’s a full reversal
60-times per second, within the polarity of both
wire. D.C. is simply the other. One wire is
unfavorable and the opposite optimistic. As we de-
sire to experiment with polarity, it’s advis-
Fig. 6.
ready to make use of D.C. Dry and moist batteries provide
D.C.
Those that want to make use of the facility mains
ought to first discover out whether or not or no their
mains are A.C. or D.C. The meter will present
this. If the mains are D.C., let it alone,
and use another supply of energy. The
purpose is that D.C. can’t be stepped up or
down as can A.C. If the mains provide this
sort of electrical energy, you’ll be able to step it down
via a bell transformer.
The resultant voltage, although decrease, will
nonetheless be A.C., and thus it will likely be obligatory
for us to rectify it, thus altering it again
to D.C. For the rectifier you have to a
strip of aluminium llin. by Bin.; a strip of
lead, similar dimensions, and a jam jar. Fill
the latter to inside two inches of the highest
with a mix of borax (two components) and
water (one half), and insert the 2 strips
of fabric, bending over the sides.
Join the 12 volt tapping of the trans-
former to the lead plate, and the unfavorable
tapping to a terminal marked “unfavorable.”
From one other terminal marked “optimistic,”
take a result in the aluminium strip. On some
transformers will likely be discovered further faucets,
that are used for various the voltage. These
will likely be of use in a while, Be aware that though
the output of the transformer on the tapping
utilized by us was 12 volts, a sure drop in
voltage will likely be brought on by the rectifier (de-
pending on its measurement), and our D.C. output will
be about 5 or 6 volts.
Now, I had meant to get a lot additional
this week, however it’s obligatory that the
sketches and drawings be included so as
to make issues fairly clear, so I haven’t a lot
room left.
Additionally, I’ve had a number of letters from read-
ers, who intimate they’re wanting ahead to
the remainder of the course. One specifically,
from Mr. C. Y. Hook, of 29 Blairgowrie
Avenue, Dulwich Hill, deserves thought. The
letter reads: —“Sir, I congratulate you on
your ‘Proving Radio’ articles. I, for one, in-
are usually a scholar. I’m of the opinion
that the research would appeal to curiosity of a
higher quantity if it might be doable to
organise teams and research circles for this
topic. It could be extra economical in
finishing up the experiments, additionally it might
give the chief of every circle an oppor-
tunity to indicate his capacity as a instructor.
Take this suggestion for what it’s price.
If you understand of any fanatic on this locality
who falls in with this concept, we’d strive it
out.”
Such ideas are welcomed. Any read-
ers might care to get in contact with
me, and preparations may very well be made.
The strategy of utilizing the A.C. mains has
solely been mentioned briefly. In subsequent subject,
diagrams will seem. Readers shouldn’t
try to make up the unit described till
they learn subsequent subject, because the rectifier has first
to be “fashioned,” in any other case a brief circuit
will happen.
Within the subsequent subject I’ll describe a easy
polarity indicator; we decompose water; make
an electrical mild plant; show that water
has resistance; make a flashlight telegraph;
electroplate with copper; nickel-plate; com-
mence studying the Morse code, and—however
certainly that’s sufficient!

P.23 – Latimers Wi-fi Provides Advert[edit]

Makes Any Radio
A NYONE can mo-
demise their
hi fi to take full
benefit of all of the
tonal enhancements
that broadcasting
has achieved from
1922 to 1928 by in-
stalling a Peerless
Constructed-In Radio Unit.
It replaces your pre-
despatched speaker, and
equals the tones of
the best new radio
units.
This Peerless Re-
producer Unit comes
in a compact sq.
cupboard, as proven in
the illustration. It
is barely 9Jin. vast, by
9 Jin. excessive, by 6in
deep. Self-contained,
all prepared to put in
in your radio.
Higher
HP HIS Peerless Unit
incorporates precisely
the identical reproduc-
ing: mechanism as
the cupboard sort of
Peerless Reproducer
that has proved to
be the biggest-sell-
in g impartial
speaker in America.
All of the matchless
Peerless High quality. All
the Peerless stamina
beneath heavy quantity.
All of the superb peform-
ance on the low
tones that old-type
audio system miss.
Get a Peerless
Constructed-In Unit to-day
—put it in your previous
radio—and see what
a distinction an actual
reproducer makes!
BUILT-IN
Peerless Reproducer
£3’l7’6
Gothic Mannequin £5/17/6
N.S.W. Dstributors: —
Latimers Wi-fi
Provides Ltd.
151 Castlereagh Avenue, Sydney
TRADE MARK
«ES.U4»e*T.OF»

P.25 – New Equipment Examined & Authorized[edit]

New Equipment
Examined & Authorized
Climax Batteries
SCIENTIFIC analysis has revealed the
essential proven fact that acids and sal-am-
moniac (largely utilized in atypical excessive
rigidity radio batteries) decompose the
zinc electrodes, inflicting a lot of the battery
bother the person has to cope with.
The “Climax” formulation doesn’t embrace
both of those chemical compounds. “Climax” is made
by a completely new technique, which ensures
excellent operation over each interval of an extended
and helpful life. Noise and unsteady opera-
tion want by no means be reckoned with in case your set
is “Climax” geared up! Undoubtedly, the
climax in battery making has been reached
on this new process-product, so aptly named.
—Brokers Fox and MacGillicuddy, Every day Tele-
graph Constructing.
Fuller Batteries
THE’ Fuller “S.W.D.” sort vary of ac-
cumulators has been designed to fulfill
the_ demand for batteries having cha-
racteristics falling between these
possessed by the atypical Plate sort and the
Fuller Block sort, that’s to say, the battery
has been purposely constructed to present environment friendly ser-
vice with discharge charges decrease than these
noramlly taken from atypical Plate bat-
teries, however higher than the charges of dis-
cost suggested for Block batteries.
The place uninteresting emitter valves are used, or
the place the discharge time interval of the cell
is about 40 hours or longer, that’s to say,
the place it’s doable to discharge the bat-
teries at a 40-hour fee, then the S.W.D.
sort battery needs to be chosen. The plates
are of various development and far
thicker than the atypical’ sort of moveable
battery plate, and are designed to carry their
cost for lengthy intervals when not in use. A
comparability curve is proven herewith, and is
of the sort proven and defined when com-
paring Block and atypical Plate sort accu-
mulators.
The Puller R.H.G. sort 20-volt, 3000-milli-
ampere-hour excessive rigidity battery is one in every of
one of the best and most profitable of the numerous
high-tension batteries available on the market. It
owes its success to the truth that it has been
designed by engineers having distinctive
information of radio working strategies, in
addition to skilled information of accumulator
design and manufacture.
The Puller vary of S.W. moveable batteries
in celluloid, ebonite, or glass container, is
the end result of a few years’ expertise, and
can also be the event of various prior
sorts. Each little element has been fastidiously
thought of and thought out, and cautious
thought has been given to the smallest com-
ponent a part of the battery.
To the common person, totally different makes of
accumulators might all look, very a lot alike.
There are, nevertheless, many small variations
and lots of factors that make for effectivity and
lengthy service.
Amalgamated Wi-fi not too long ago organised a contest, that includes Marconi
Valves and Audio system. To every entrant was equipped a big drawing, containing
quite a few objects, the names of which started with the letter “If.” There have been in all
217 names. In a single case, a competitor forwarded 1760 names, fairly a quantity ranged
across the 1000 mark f whereas one optimist contented himself with 17, simply 200 quick.
The prizes have been: First, a money prize of £25; second, a money prise of £10; and third,
a Marconi loud speaker, valued at £5. As well as, there have been sixteen comfort
prises of a Marconi economic system valve (DEP or DEL sort). The makes an attempt despatched in,
nevertheless, have been so creditable that Amalgamated Wi-fi determined to make every of
the sixteen comfort prises two Marconi valves. The judges have been Mr. W. T.
Crawford (Radio Inspector, Sydney), Mr. Harry J. Weston (well-known artist),
and Mr. J. F. Wilson (assistant supervisor, Amalgamated Wi-fi Alsia, Ltd.). This
{photograph} reveals the opening and checking of competitors entries.

P.25 – Railway Radio Firm Advert[edit]

“The Peridyne
Tremendous R.F.”
Elements for the above Receiver
will likely be posted free to any
place in New South Wales.
Items forwarded per Worth
Payable Submit in that case desired
LIST OF PARTS REQUIRED:
£ s. d.
1 Panel, 24 x Eight x 3-l6in. 10 6
1 Panel, 24 x 10 x 3-16 in. 13 0
1 Pair Brackets Three 0
5 De-Jur Sockets 6 3
2-30 Ohm Rheostats . . ….» 5 0
4-1 Mf. Fastened Condensers ..? 16 0
Three R.F. Chokes 16 6
l Emmco Vernier Dial and three
.0005 Condensers, with
Detachable Shafts for Con-
denser Unit 2 5 0
1 Royalty Resistance 11 0
2 Transformers 1 1 0
1 Carborundum Detector . . Eight 6
1 Filament Jack 2 9
l .001 Condenser 1 6
1 30-Volt Bias Battery …. 9 6
1 Doz. Lengths Bus Bar Wire 0 10
2 Lengths Spaghetti 0 10
2 Philips 442 Display Grid
Valves ( . Three Zero 0
1 Philips 8409 Display Grid
Valve 16 0
1 Philips 8403 Display Grid
Valve 15 0
1 Philips 8405 Display Grid
Valve 1. Zero 0
1 Radiokes Peridyne Package … 3 15 0
TERMS
Items equipped on a Deposit of 27-
within the £. No Phrases to Nation
Clients
CASH ORDERS TAKEN
RAILWAY RADIO
COMPANY,
Rawson Chambers,
495 a Pitt Avenue, SYDNEY
’Cellphone MA5288. ’Cellphone MA5288.

P.26 – Colville-Moore Wi-fi Provides[edit]

Assured Radio Elements
Nation Shoppers Be aware. —Postage paid on Orders
over 10/-, apart from Units, Loud Converse-
ers, Batteries, Aerial Wires, and Worth Payable
Parcels. All Items offered with a Cash Again Gua-
rantee; if not happy and returned inside ten
days, cash will likely be refunded.
Beneath is a Checklist of Elements for Constructing
“THE SUPER R.F. PERIDYNE”
£ s. d.
1 Bakelite Panel, 24 x Eight x 3-16 in … 0 12 0
1 Bakelite Sub-Panel, 24 xlO x 3~16in 0 15 0
1 Pair Airzone Brackets Zero Three 6
5 A.V/.A. Valve Sockets, 3/- every (Anti-Vibration) 0 15 0
2 Rheostats—3o Ohm Zero 7 0
1 30-Ohm Rheostat Zero Three 6
Four T.C.C. 1 Mfd. Bi-Cross Condensers 1 2 0
1 Radiokes Peridyne Coil Package 3 15 0
Three Radiokes R.F. Chokes 1 5 6
1 Emmco Three Gang .0005 Condenser Unit Three Zero 0
1 Emmco Velmo Vernier Dial Zero 6 0
1 Royalty 0-100,000 Ohms Variable Resistance …. 011 0
2 Philips Transformers 2 15 0
1 Carborundum Everlasting Kind Crystal Detector . . Zero Eight 5
1 Mixture Filament and Single Circuit Jack …. Zero Three 3
1 .001 Wetless Kind “B” Fastened Condenser Zero 2 0
1 1 Terminals Zero 2 9
1 30-Volt “B” Battery for “C” Bias Zero 9 6
Adequate Glazite Wiring for Set Zero Three 6
2 Philips A 442 Display Grid Valves Three Zero 0
1 Philips 8409 0 15 0
1 Philips 8403 *. 0 15 0
1 Philips 8405 1 Zero 0
“COLMOVOX RECEIVERS” r
£ s. d.
Crystal Units, full with Telephones, Aerial, and many others., from .300
Single Valve Units, full, prepared to put in, from … 4 10 0
Two Valve Units, full with Loudspeaker, and many others., from 15 Zero 0
Three Valve Units, full with Loudspeaker, and many others., from 17 10 0
Three Valve All-Electrical, full with Speaker …. 28 Zero 0
4 Valve Set, full with Speaker, and many others 28 Zero 0
5 Valve Set, full with Speaker, and many others., from . . 33 10 0
Colville-Moore Wi-fi Provides
Restricted
10 ROWE STREET (Subsequent Lodge Australia),
SYDNEY
’PHONE, B 2261. ’PHONE, B 2261.

P.26 – 2BL Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation[edit]

The
2BL
Girls’s Sports activities
Affiliation
The Actions of a Common
Organisation
ABOUT two years in the past Miss Gwen Var-
ley joined the employees of 2BL, and im-
mediately started to speak interest-
ingly and with authority on ladies’s
sporting issues. Her talks will need to have been
fascinating, as a result of,’ eight months in the past, an
military of Miss Varley’s listeners demanded
one thing sensible in sport, in order that they
would possibly learn how Miss Varley’s theories
on tennis service, driving off the tee, and the
crawl stroke labored out in follow.
The 2BL WOMEN’S SPORTS ASSOCIA-
TION was fashioned at once. Mrs. Ro-
land Conway, the worldwide tennis participant,
was elected president, Mrs. L. Brittain and
Mrs. E. Norton have been elected vice-presidents,
Mrs. O. Raz the treasurer, and Miss Gwen
Varley the secretary. 300 mem-
bers are enrolled, and roughly seven-
teen golf equipment ship two representatives every to
committee conferences, that are to happen,
in future, on the primary Wednesday of the
month, on the 2FC studios.
TENNIS
The affiliation has an excessive amount of vitality.
Miss Varley is organising a ladies’s cricket
workforce, and tennis golf equipment have been fashioned at
Coogee, Maroubra, Strathfield, Ashfield,
Manly, Waverley, and Chatswood. The golf equipment
retain the companies of a reliable tennis
coach for sooner or later in each week; so there’s
no haphazard slashing with these gamers.
Tennis prices not more than 7s 6d per thirty days
per member. The golf equipment have already performed
many problem matches; however subsequent yr
there will likely be a 2BL tennis competitors, or-
ganised by various gamers who’ve
beforehand performed in tournaments.
GOLF
Twenty members have fallen victims to
golf, and so they and different valiant ones who
want to study the science are given classes
by Mr. Oldfield They exit as soon as a fort-
evening to Collaroy, or to an alternate course,
members who’ve automobiles driving the others
down.
SWIMMING
Each Friday morning thirty of the associ-
ation’s mermaids assemble on the Area
Baths to study swimming and to enhance
their strokes. There are skilled instruc-
tors, the payment being 7s 6d per time period of six les-
sons. Miss Varley tells us that the oldest
The Badge of the Affiliation.
member is fifty-six, and has simply learnt to
swim.
These few however essential information assist one to
perceive how, some weeks again, this Ama-
zonian affiliation boldly approached Mr.
Anderson, of the New South Wales Broadcast-

Miss Given Varley
ing Co., who very readily granted them the
half-hour between 11 and 11.30 a.m. for the
2BL, Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation Session.
This session won’t be devoted solely to
sport; there will likely be ladies audio system to speak
on every kind of academic topics. A
collection of talks on artwork will likely be given by Miss
V. M‘Kee; on literature, by Mrs. Gwen
Spencer; on citizenship, by Mrs. Albert Lit-
tlejohn; and on thrift, by Miss Janet Mit-
chell.
Radio has proved its usefulness as a pri-
vate theatre, live performance and vaudeville, as a
information medium, and as an data bureau.
However the world grows uninterested in theatres and
live shows evening after evening. It even grows
uninterested in information and market studies. The
way forward for radio lies not a lot in its energy
of amusing and informing, however in its energy
for helping the every day lifetime of the neighborhood,
for turning into an indispensable buddy to
each listener; for drawing the multitudinous
threads of particular person pursuits into one nice
public curiosity. That radio has produced
such a contented group of ladies because the 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation reveals that these
issues are doable.
Miss Varley, pictured above, says that the
best trigger for satisfaction is that the
demand for a sports activities affiliation got here of its
personal accord. However issues don’t occur like
that. In the event you ever meet. Miss Varley you’ll
perceive precisely why the 2BL Girls’s
Sports activities Affiliation every day will increase its popu-
larity and its membership.
Uncle Ben
I’’ WO nights at 4QG, Tuesday and
Saturday, are performed by Uncle Ben
with many and different assistants.
Tuesday is normally put aside for the extra
critical issues of life—quick tales with a
ethical, edifying verse, and track. At current
“Staanley,” somewhat blind lad, assists on Tues-
days.
Saturdays are actual holidays. Benefiting by
an additional 15 minutes that evening is given as much as
actual leisure. The maddest of schoolboy,
pranks are indulged in to the merriment even
of the serious-minded engineer on the opposite
facet of the studio window.
The “Professor’s” whiskers are reduce off.
“Grandfather’s” tooth is pulled; “Tony”
(the horse) is so weak that he should be
propped up with a piano and a chair; a fowl-
hcuse is constructed, and lots of extra and equally
gratifying stunts are put over.
Uncle Ben is Mr. L. L. Learn, managing
director of Learn Press, Ltd., Adelaide Avenue
Brisbane, and he asserts that it’s a actual and
useful leisure to spend an all too quick
half-hour with the children on Tuesday
ana Saturday evenings.
ft
nr
J Three ro.

P.27 – Noyes Bros Advert[edit]

LOUDSPEAKER?
.ttr Converse -^^7
, by making Rad ‘° »tt
‘mg ear y Reception
P leaSU !h unmavrea by /
» ?m°vtatio»* »

e % v o
TWENTY GUINEAS.
aZZ Radio Sellers.
Write for Pamphlet, “B.W.W.’
A FAMOUS PEDIGREE
Each Brown Speaker is constructed with that very same exacting
precision which characterises all Brown Merchandise.
For a few years the title BROWN has been consultant
of the criterion in Loud Audio system, and whichever mannequin
is chosen from the well-known pedigree, it’s assured to
give the Service and Satisfaction for which it was constructed.
Get your Seller to reveal one for you.
Ihe distinction will shock you, and win you over to
the best Speaker on your personal explicit Set.
0
t
Q
0
Q
i
LOUD-SPEAKERS
NOYES BROS.
Noyes Bros. (Melbourne) Pty., Ltd.,
495 Bourke Avenue, MELBOURNE.
Adelaide: 139 Pirie Avenue.
Hobart: $6 Argyle Avenue.
Launceston: 59 George Avenue.
Perth: J. R. W. Graham and Co.
Noyes Bros. (Sydney), Ltd.,
115 Clarence Avenue.
Newcastle: 11 Watt Avenue.
Brisbane: Ferry Home, Elizabeth St.

P.28 – Phillips Advert[edit]

w
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(lOO”
PHILIPS.
BAA 3
iAmA)
v F =A,O V
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v a =so-150V
i s &50 m A
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‘1,150 V
s*
VgstlOOV
£
v
POPULAR SIX VOLT TYPES
Vg [Volt)
-50 -AO -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30
so
i a (mA)
PHILIPS
BIOS
r** 4,0 V
fr= 0.15 A
/>= ft/5 A
fanso-150V
! S m 50 mA
i:
2.4
X
LOPE, or as it
hr*
YgtyOlt)
<5O -40 -30 -20 HO 0 10 20 often called, Mutual Conductance, ideates just how good a radio valve is. T s higher the slope the larger the change i plate current for a given grid voltagi Look at the sloj watts.” Some of of Philips “Mini- bin you will see are as high as 2.4 m A/V* Sheer; that’s the only word that describes them! e) Lll MINIWATTS

P.30 – List of World’s Broadcasting Stations[edit]

Checklist of World’s Broadcasting Stations Which May be
Obtained in Australia on Lengthy and Quick Waves
AUSTRALIA.
New South Wales.
Metres. Watts.
2FC—N.S.W. B’casting
Co., Ltd. Market St.,
Sydney, 0700-2230 .. 442 5000
2BL, —N.S.W. B’casting
Cc., Ltd., Market St..
Sydney, 0800-2830 . . , 363 5000
2GB T h eosophical
B’casting Station, 29
Bligh St., Sydney,
1000-2200 316 3000
2KY —Trades and La-
bour Council, Goul-
burn St., Sydney,
0900-2200 280 1500
2UW —-Radio B’casting
Ltd., Paling’s Construct-
ing, Ash St., Sydney,
1230-2230 267 500
2UE —Electrical Utili-
ties, Ltd., 619 George
St., Sydney, 0730-2330 293 250
2MK—Mockler Bros.,
Ltd., Hawick St.,
Bathurst 27,5 250
2HD—H. A. Douglas,
King St., Newcastle 2SB 100
2BE—Burgin Electrical
Co., 340 Kent St.,
Sydney. At current
off the air 316 100
Victoria.
3LO—Dominions B’cast-
ing Co., 120 A Russell
St., Melbourne, 0715-
224 0 371 5000
3AR—Dominions B’cast-
ing C 0.,, 120 A Russell
St., Melbourne, 1000-
2200 484 1600
3UZ—O. J. Nilson and
Co., Bourke St., Mel-
bourne …….. . 319 inn
2DB—Druleigh Bust-
Metres. Watts,
ness Faculty, Mel-
bourne 255 600
Queensland.
4QG —Queensland Govt.
Radio Service, Bris-
bane, 0800-2200 …. 385 5000
4GR—Gold Radio Ser-
vice, Margaret St.,
Toowoomba 294 100
South Australia
sCL—Central B’casters,
Ltd., 59 Franklin St.,
Adelaide, 1100-2310.. 395 5000
SDN—SDN Pty., Ltd.,
2-Four Montpelier St.,
Parkside 313 500
SKA—Sport Radio,
Ltd., 51 Kintore Av.,
Prospect 260 1000
West Australia.
6 WF—Westralian Far-
mers, Ltd., 569 Wel-
lington St., Perth,
1230-2230 1250 5000
100
Tasmania.
7ZL T a s m a nian
B’casters Pty., 95
Elizabeth St., Ho-
bart. 1130-2204 …. 535 3000
NEW ZEALAND.
IYA—Radio B’casting
Co. of New Zealand,
419 Queen St,, Auck-
land, 1506-2203. Sil-
ent day Mon 333 500
2Y A —Radio B’casting
Co. of New Zealand,
Wellington, 1500-
2200. Silent day
„ , 420 5000
3YA—Radio B’casting
Co. of New Zealand,
Christchurch. 1500-
Metres. Watts.
2103. Silent day
Tues. 306 500
4YA —Radio B’easting
Co. of New. Zealand,
Dunedin, 1700-2200.
Silent days Mon.
and Thurs, 463 750
FOREIGN
GREAT BRITAIN.
2LO—-British B’casting
Co., Savoy Hill, Lon-
don, 1900-0850 .. 361.4 30bfl
sXX—British B’casting
Co., Dkventry, 1900-
0850 … . 1604.3 5000
10000
UNITED STATES.
KDKA Westinghouse
Electrical and Manu-
facturing Co., E.
■ Pittsburg, Pa 315.6 60000
KFi—Earle C. Anthony
Inc., 1000 So., Hope
St.,. Los Angeles …. 468.5 6000
KGO—Basic Electrical
Co., Ltd., Oakland,
California 384.4 5000
KOA—Basic Electrical
Co., Ltd., 1370 Kra-
meria St., Denver
Colorado …….. 325.9 6000-
_ 10000
WEA.F Nat ional
B’casting Co., 1950
Broadway, New
York 491.5 50000
WGY—Basic Electrical
Co., So., Scenec-
tady; N.Y. … 378,5 6000.0
WJZ—Nationwide B’cast-
ing Co.. 195 Broad-
means, New York .. . 454.3 30000
EUROPE.
FL Eiffel Tower,
Paris, France 2650 5000
Metres. Watts.
JAPAN.
JOAK—Tokio Central
B’casting Co., Tokio,
Japan. Jap. stations
obtained, about
midnight on Solar-
day 375 1000
JOBK—Osaka Central
B’casting Co., Osaka 385 1000
JOCK—Nagoya Central
B’casting Co., Na-
goya 360 1000
JODK—Keijo B’casting
Co., Keijo, Japan . 345 1000
DUTCH EAST INDIES.
JPC—Bataviasche Ra-
dio, Jereeninging,
Batavia 220 40
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.
KZRM—Radio Corp. of
. the Philippines, Man-
413 1000
KZKZ—Radio Corp. of
the Philippines, Man-
ila 270 500
KZlB—Radio Corp. of
the Philippines, Man-
ila 260 500
INDIA.
7CA—lndian B’casting
Co., Calcutta. In-
, dian stations re-
ceived greatest about.
1.30 a.m. Monday.. 370.4 3000
7BY —Indian B’casting
Co., Bombay 357.1 3000
SOUTH AFRICA.
WAMG Afri ca n
B’casting Assn., Cape-
, 375 1500
JB—African B’casting
Assn., Johannes-
burg 450 500
Worldwide Quick Wave Stations: Occasions Acknowledged are S.M.T.
Metres.
AUSTRALIA.
2ME—A.W.A. (Syd.). relays
2FC, instances irregular,
normally Mon., from 0430-
0600 ……. 28.5
2YG—Ray All Sop (Syd.),
relays 2BL, instances vari-
ous 32,5
3ME—-A.W.A. (Melb.), re-
lays 3LO, instances varied.
Often heard about
0430-0630 32
6AG—W. E. Coxori (Perth),
relays 6WF. Occasions var-
ious. Often 2130-0200
every day 32.9
GREAT BRITAIN.
5SW —Marconi Co. (Lon-
don), relays 2LO, 0400-
0800. every day, besides Solar.
and Mon. From 0330 on
alternate Saturdays, and
2100-2230 every day 25
2YT—Marconi Radio, Pold-
hu. Occasions varied 25, 32, 92, 94
2NM—Gerald Marcuse, Cat-
erham, Surrey, 1700-0400-
0600 (Solar), 1000, Thurs.
and Sat 32.5 28
GLW-—Beam Station, all
instances (Dorchester) …. 15.7
GLQ —Beam Station, all
instances all through day.
(Ongar) 24.5
GBH Beam Station,
Grimsby (Beam • Sta-
tion). All instances 25.9
UNITED STATES.
2XAD —G. E.C., Schenec-
tady. Relays WGY, 0830- –
1300 Mon., 0400-0600
Tues. and Fri., 0800-
1300 Thurs. and Sat. .. 21.96
6XZAR —San Francisco,
1000, every day 33
IXL—Bou.ndbrOok. Reiays
WJZ 59,98
9XU —Council Bluffs. Re- 1
lays Columbian B’east-
ing stations 61.06
’XBA —Newark, N.J, Re-
lays I WAAM, 1000-1500
_Wed„ Fri., and Solar 65.18
<^E —Cleveland, every day from 1500 66.04 -’XAL—lnglewood. every day „ Metres. trom 0930 66.04 WBZ—Springfield. Relays WBK _ 70 2X AP—Sohenectady, Tues. 0900-1500; Wed., 0900- 1430; Fri., 0900-1500; Solar., 0900-1500 .... 32.4 WLW —Ohio. 0900, besides Sat. and Mon 52 02 KBKA —East Pittsburg. Every day, from 0800 .... 43.35. 63 WIZ—New Brunswick. Ir- common, normally after „ • • 43.35, 61,06 7XAO—Portland, Oregon. Every day from 0900-2300 .. 63.54 2XG —Rocky Level, from 2400 Mon. and Fri 16.02 2XE—Richmond Hill. Re- lays WABC every day, , from 0800 22.1 W0WO —Fort Wayne, In- diana! Relays. Columbian stations every day, 0800 .... 22.8 8XK.—E. Pittsburg, Re- lays KDKA, 0300-0600, Tues. and Wed. ... .. 26.8 2XAG—New York. Tele- phony, irregular 26.92 2XATj—New York. Relays WRNY, 0900-1400 Tues.; 1100-1200 Wed.; 1200- 1300 Sat; 30.91 8XAO— Detroit, Mich. Re- lays WJR every day 32 WOVG—Brooklyn. Every day, 0900 54 2XE—New York. Relays WARC and WBOQ every day. 0900 : 58.5 2XAA—Houlton. Transat- lantic telephony 22.99 INDO-CHINA. HVA. —Hanoi. No informa- tion obtainable 31.85 HOLLAND. PCXiL—Kootwijk. 2240- 2400 Wed.; and from 0200 Thurs 21.96 PCMM—The Hague. Irre- gular 26 PCJJ —Eindhoven. 0300- 0600, Wed. and Fri.; 0900-2400 Sat.; 0100-0400 Solar 31.4 PCTT- —Kootwijk. 0300- 0600 Wed. and Fri,: 0900- Metres. 2400 Sat.; 0100-0400 Solar. 21 PCPP —Kootwijk. Wed. and Fri., 0300-0600; Sat.. 0900-2400; Solar., 0100- 0400 , 27 PCUU—The Hague, 0300- 0600, Wed. and Fri.; 0900-2,400, Sat.; 0100-0400, Solar 42 UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS. RPN—U.S.S.R., Moscow 29, 60, 50 RFM—U.S.S.R., Siberia . . 60, '3O ITALY, TMI —Milan 45 TDO—ltaly 33.5 lAX~ Rome 45 IMA—-Rome. 0700 Solar.; 0300-0530. Mon 34.5 SOUTH AFRICA. JB—Johannesburg 20, 25 JAPAN. JHBB—lbarakiken, nightly 37.5 JIPP —Tokio .. 20 JIAA —Iwatsuki 79 JKZB—Tokio 20 GERMANY. AGJ —Nauen. Every day, 0.50,0 56.7 POX —Nauen 70 POZ —-Nauen. Press and information studies to ships 19, 26.4 AGA—Nauen. Press and information, every day 25.3 AGC-J-Nauen. All through day 17.2 AFK—Doeberitz. Tues.. Thurs., Sat., 0500-0600 CCall appears like “Ar- Eff-Automotive”) 37.65, 67.65 NORWAY. LGN —Bergen. 0900. Irre- gular 30, 31.25 Stavenger. Information bul- letins. 0400 12.14 SWEDEN. 7MR—Copenhagen. Irre- gular 39.2, 32.8 7RL —Copenhagen 42.12 Mbtala. Assessments irre- gularly after midnight 41 DENMARK. ED7RL —Copenhagen. 2130- 2300, Mon.; 0620-0700, Wed.; 0900-0930, Solar. Image transmissions, 0900-1100. Tues. and Sat. 42.12 AUSTRIA. OKK2-—Vienna 70 OHK2—Vienna. Mon., 0400- ' 1100 70 SPAIN. Casablanca 51 FRANCE. GO —Paris gj TR—Lyon. Every day, 0230- —0330 40, 20 Pt-—Paris. Time indicators, 1756-0556 32 PW—Ste. Assise. At odd instances all through dav... 14.28 Radio Vitis, Paris, 0700-0900 37 Radio Agen, Prance. Wed. and Sat, 0800-0915 39,75 SWITZERLAND. EH9XD—Zurich. Relay work, Tues., Thurs., and Solar 85 _ 32 EH9oC—Berne. 0500-0600. 32 JAVA. ANP —Malabar 5g JPC —Batavia 22, 40 ANDIR —Bandoeng ...... 38 5 ANP—Malabar. 0340-0540. Wed. and Fri.. . 32, 31.26, 15.93 ANH—Malabar. 2240-2440, Sat 17.4, 27, 32 INDIA. VWZ—Poona, Beam station 16.3 FINLAND. SPM—HelsingTors. 1930- ORS O 47, 31.5 BELGIUM. 4GG—Brussels. Nearly every day. 0600-0900 34.7 40U—Brussels. Nearly nightly. 0800-0900 .... 43.6 TUNIS. BKR—Constantine. Solar solely. 0800-1000 42.8 MOROCCO. AlN—Casablanca. 1930- 0630. Climate report . . 51

P.31 – Native Programmes, Friday, January 11[edit]

Native Programmes, Friday, January 11
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
7 a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins. 7.5
a.m.: Studio music. 7.20 a.m.: Nation
session; official climate forecast, rainfall,
temperatures, astronomical memoranda,
transport intelligence, mail companies, river
studies. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market,
mining sharemarket, steel quotations. 7.35
a.m.: Wool gross sales, breadstuffs markets, in-
ter-State markets, produce market. 7.45
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” abstract.
7.50 a.m.: Studio music. Eight a.m.: “Huge
Ben”; shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
10 a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins. 10.2
a.m.: Pianoforte replica. 10.10 a.m.:
“Sydney Morning Herald” information service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.: Final
minute sporting data by the 2FC
racing commissioner. 10.40 a.m.: Studio
music. 11 a.m.: “Huge Ben”; A.P.A. and
Reuter’s cable companies. 11.5 a.m.: Shut
down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
12 midday: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
12.1 p.m.: Inventory Alternate, first name. 12.3:
Official climate forecast; rainfall. 12.5:
Studio music. 12.10 p.m.: Abstract of
information, “Sydney Morning Herald.” 12.15
p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18 p.m.:
A studying. 12.30: Studio music. 1 p.m.:
“Huge Ben”; climate intelligence. 1.Three p.m.:
“Night Information” noon information service; Professional-
ducers’ Distributing Society’s report. 1.20
p.m.: Studio music. 1.28 p.m.: Inventory Ex-
change, second name. 1.30 p.m.: Studio
music. 2 p.m.: “Huge Ben”; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Recital of chosen information of world-
well-known artists. Three p.m.: “Huge Ben”; piano-
forte replica. 3.15 p.m.: Common
music. 3.30 p.m.: A sketch by the stu-
dents of the MacCunn Faculty, beneath the
path of H. W. Varna. 3.45 p.m.:
Mamie Harris, soprano. 3.52: Marjorie
Berry, contralto. Four p.m.: “Huge Ben”; a
sketch by the College students of the MacCunn
Faculty, beneath the path of H. W. Var-
na. 4.15 p.m.: From the Wentworth, the
Wentworth Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath
the path of Jimmy Elkins. 4.25 p.m.:
From the Studio, Mamie Harris, soprano.
4.32 a.m.: Marjorie Berry, contralto. 4.39
p.m.: Studio music. 4.45 p.m.: Third name
of the Inventory Alternate. 4.47 p.m.: Studio
music. 5 p.m.: “Huge Ben”; shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.: The Youngsters’s Session, performed
by the “Good day Man”; letters and tales.
6.10 p.m.: The Farmyard 5, from Kooka-
burra Gully.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market studies (wool,
wheat, and inventory).
6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable markets.
6.43 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data.
6.45 p.m.: Climate and transport information.
6.48 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
6.50 p.m.: Late sporting information, advised by the
2FC racing commissioner.
7 p.m.: “Huge Ben”; late information service.
7.10 p.m.: Particular Report Recital.
EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer; Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte replica.
7.52 p.m.: Common music.
Eight p.m.: “Huge Ben”; by the courtesy of
J. C. Williamson, Ltd., a programme will
be organized to-night from one in every of Sydney’s
main theatres.
9 p.m.: From the Studio; climate report.
Mild Music 4, instrumentalists.
(a) Overture, “Morning, Midday, and Night time”
(Suppe).
(b) “Scarf Dance” (Chaminade).
9.15 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
(a) “Dolorosa” (Phillips).
(b) “Pricey Little Star” (Foster).
9.22 p.m.: Tom Fogett, novelty pianist.
(a) “My Coronary heart Stood Nonetheless” (Hart-Rogers).
(b) “The Man I Love” (Gershwin).
9.29 p.m.: The Two Outdated Cronies.
9.39 p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instrumen-
talists.
(a) “Elsa’s Dream” (Wagner).
(b) “Three Dances from ‘The Palace
of Puck’” (Leyland).
9.58 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
(a) “The Irish Emigrant” (Parker).
(b) “Birds’ Songs at Eventide” (Coates).
10.5 p.m.: Tom Fogett, novelty pianist.
(a) “After My Laughter” (Donaldson).
(b) “As a result of My Child” (Donaldson).
(c) “What a Man” (Donaldson).
10.12 p.m.: Two Outdated Cronies.
10.22 p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instru-
mentalists,
(a) “Cherry Blossom” (Marling).
(b) “When Frances Dances” (Nerrol).
10.29 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and Chimes; information from the
“Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25 a.m. Stu-
dio music. 8.30: G.P.O. clock, and chimes,
studio music. 8.35 a.m.: Data,
mails, transport, arrivals, departures, and
sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information from the “Every day
Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.45 a.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes; studio music. 9 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; studio music.
9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with silent mates.
10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Girls’s
session, performed by Mrs. Cranfield. 12
midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast and climate report. 12.3
p.m.: Pianoforte replica. 12.30 p.m.:
Transport and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market
studies. 12.45 p.m.: “Solar” noon information
service. 1 p.m.: Studio music. 1.30 p.m.:
Speak to kids and particular leisure
for youngsters in hospital. 2 p.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes. Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
studio music. 3.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, performed by Bennie Abrahams.
Four p.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
frofri the studio, Millie Hansen, soprano—
‘ (a) “Love, Right here Is My Coronary heart” (Ross), (b)
“The Flight of Ages” (Bevan). 4.7 p.m.:
Arthur Aldis, ’cellist. 4.14 p.m.: Violet
Hunt, contralto. 4.21 p.m.: Romano’s
Dance Orchestra, performed by Bennie
Abrahams. 4,31 p.m.: Millie Hansen, so-
prano. 4.38 p.m.: Arthur Aldis, ’cellist.
4.45 p.m.: Violet Hunt, contralto. 4.52
p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orchestra, conduc-
ted by Bennie Abrahams. 5 p.m.: The
chimes of the G.P.O. clock; from the stu-
dio, “Our Serial Story.” 5.10 p.m.: “Solar”
Information Service. 5.17 p.m.: Pianoforte re-
manufacturing. 5.27 p.m.: Common studio
music. 5.35 p.m.: Producers’ Distributing
Society’s poultry report. 5.37 p.m.: Fea-
tures of the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcers: J. Knight Barnett and Basil
Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s Session —music and en-
tertainment.
6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: Particular dinner recital.
7.10 p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s report; climate report and
forecast, by courtesy of Authorities Me-
teorologist; Producers’ Distributing Socie-
ty’s fruit »and vegetable market report;
grain and fodder report (“Solar”); dairy
produce report (“Solar”).
7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam in Adver-
tising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Margaret Madden and Frances Lea, violm
and vocal —
(a) “Was It A Dream?”
(b) Violin solo, “Chanson” (Friml),
(c) “I Love the Moon” (Rubens).
8.10 p.m.: From the Arcadia Theatre, Chats-
wooden, Nicholas Robins, on the Wurlitzer
organ.
8.30 p.m.: From the studio —
Roger Jones, baritone.
8.37 p.m.: Robert Turner and Tot Loudon,
in standard sketches.
8.47 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
8.57 p.m.: Climate report.
8.59 p.m.: Final-minute racing data by
O R DGxtcr
914 p.m.: Margaret Madden and Frances
‘ Lea, violin and vocal, in standard melodies—
(a) “Jeannine,”
(b) Track, “At Dawning” (Cadman).
(c) “Ramona.”
9.24 p.m.: Frank Ryan, entertainer.
9.31 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
9.41 p.m.: Roger Jones, baritone.
9.48 p.m.: Robert Turner and Tot Loudon,
in standard sketches.
9.58 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band, with
standard choruses by Artwork Leonard.
10.Eight p.m.: Frank Ryan, entertainer.
10.15 p.m.: From the Arcadia Theatre, Chats-
wooden—Nicholas Robins on the Wurlitzer
organ.
10.30 p.m.: From the studio —The Savoyans
Dance Band, with standard choruses by Artwork
Leonard. , ,
10.57 p.m.: Resume of following days pro-
gramme and late climate report.
10.59 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem.
Shut down.
2UW
12.30 p.m.: Music. 1.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes, and Music. 2.30 p.m.: Shut
down. 4.30 p.m.: Musical programme. 5.30
pm.: Youngsters’s Hour, performed gy Uncle
Jack. 6.30 p.m.: Shut down. 7 p.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes. 7 p.m.: Music. . Eight p.m..
To-day’s anniversary. 8.2 p.m.: Musical pro-
gramme. 9 p.m.: Clock and chimes; com-
ments on overseas affairs, by Mr. J. M. Pren-
tice. 10 p.m.: Shut down. ,
Comparable programme as above for Monday,
14th Jan., Tuesday, 15th, Wednesday, 16th,
and Thursday, 17th.

P.32 – Interstate Programmes, Friday, January 11[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Friday, January 11
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION
745 a.m.: Morning melodies, 7.20 a.m ■ Mnm-
ftWMWrclse* muslc – 7 – 30 ft-m.: Shares studies:
(n*lm,«tJ e ® or o’n basic information: shinning; sporting
data. 8.Zero a.m.; Melbourne Observatory time
Shut-down 1 a ‘ m ‘ : Mornipg: melodies. 845’ a.m.:
~ _ .MORNING SESSION,
11.Zero a.m.: SLOs totally different dainties for the every day
“ i A^ e was+> l « l-20 -ii a ‘ m,: Musical interlude. 11.35 a.nu:
Au Fait will sneak on “Fashions.” 11,40 am •
Gramophone recital.
MIDDAY SESSION.
12.Zero midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign
Specific prepare data. 12. l p.’m.: Costs® re-
ceived by the Mines and Metnls Affiliation from
the London Inventory Alternate at the present time British oflL
cial wi-fi information from Rugby; Renter’s and Aus-
trallan Press Affiliation cables: “Argus” information ser-
vice. 1245 p.m.; Newmarket inventory gross sales; soeMal
report by John M’Namara and Co. 12 20 p.m.: The
station orchestra, Overture, “Euranthe” (Weber)
“ ° rc^ l ra ‘ Overture, “Euranthe” (Weber).
Warum’ (Schumann). 12.30 0.m.: John Bvrne
i b £ 5 ? >, J ,y emission of J. Zero Williamson. Ltd. 12 37
Pfjh* ® toc %. Alternate data. 12.40 p.m.: The
station orchestra Overture. “Idomeneus” (Mo-art)
Midsummer Night time” (Aloenfs). 12.50 p.m.: Mvrtle
ISC^UIfi Qntra «l oK , l 3 *«*,; Jorgen-
®ep • Spanish Dance ’ (Sarasate). 1.4
P,™,- Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief
141 P-m.; Meteorological ipformatmn:
climate forecast for Victoria, New South Wales Tas-
A u ?« ralla: ocean forecasts: river
ra rr f §H’ „ l Vr® ! – station orchestra,
overture, Usdise’ (Lortzing), 1.28 p.m •- John
“Tn rn trJ b o ß) n 1-35 mm.: The. station orchestra
Within the Backyard* (Goldmark). 1.40 p.m : Mvrtle
Walsgott (contralto). 1.47 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
The Strad Trio, “On. 70 ip D Malar”
{Beethoven). Allegro eon bris. Largo assai. Presto.
… NIGHT SESSION
Madame Soward. “French With out,
S , to ? ok Alternate data. 7.15
fim;;-oi S ? eC L a i r S po Z’ t bv John M’Namara and Co.
Official report of the Newmarket inventory gross sales bv the
Related Inventory and Station Brokers. RouNie road
Melbourne Fish market studies, bv J. H. Borrett
ports Kabbitorices. River studies. Market re-
ports, bv the Victorian Producers’ Co-operative Com-
pany, Ltd. Poultry, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairv
fr, uofatoes, and onions. Market studies of
♦OVI the _X. c J orian Fruiterers’ Affiliation. Re-
roiiPS-, ?; Wholesale costs of fruit bv the Entire-
sale Fruit Retailers’ Affiliation. Citrus fruits,
Hews session. Stumps scores, Sheffield
£?*?“ c , rick * R t’ match. South Australia v. New South
Okay es *Adelaide 7 .43 P.m.: Birthday greetings.
7.45 p.m.: Out of the Previous. 7.46 p.m.: Below the
!i S , P uf s the ,Division of Agriculture, Miss
Knight will sneak on “Residence Utilisation of Fruits
in Season. 8.Zero p.m.: A Maker of Historical past. 8.1 p.m •
H, Okay. Love will sneak on “Technicalities.” 8.10 om ;
Collingwood Residents’ Band. March, “Krellehall ”
Overture, If I Had been King.” 8.20 p.m.: Violet .Taek-
iS Jl OpP n no e, “Strawberries.” “Love is Meant
to Make Us Glad.” 8.27 p.m.: Collingwood Citi-
zens Band. Waltz, “Hearts of chilly.” 8,34 p.m.:
i r £« r V, Hobb – s J b ,^ itoneK . “Pagan” (Lohr). “Out of
7 a lt . /Martin), 8.41 p,m.: Agnes For-
tune (piano), “Anltra’s Dance” (Grieg). 8.50 nm –
Collingwood Residents’ Band, Trio. Final Act of
(Sior, 0 ‘ 1 ”™ ‘ ®-57 p.m,: Sydney Hollister
/comic). “5 Minutes’ Enjoyable.” 9.Four n.m.: Col-
Ba ? d – March. “The Runaway.”
Cornet solo, “When You and I Had been Younger. Magazine-
-11 P-m-: John Hobbs (baritone), “The Raft”
i Seaways (Sanderson). 948 run.: Eric
Welch will converse on to-morrow’s races at Epsom.
Mulligan s Musketeers.” Mulligan’s Musketeers. “Vi- •
v. W ’ G. Gosbell. “Harlequin.” George
nI y -A. a /l d cb S ru ?’ -& st a Track at Twilight,” Mil-
Ear . l ,i, Morning.” Refrain. “Troopers’
fpom .”Fawst.” George English (tenor).
The Message, “Requiem.” Jack Stewart and
?l*7, ine L Qn the Qld Banjo.” Eileen Sheri-
dan, A Little Brown Owl.” Refrain, “Volga Boat
pP e ? rge .«JS- y( ; e , and refrain – “Charmaine.”
Marion Davies, “Oh, My Fernando” (operatic aria)
Refrain, .Honey, I Desires Yer Now.” Ted Jones
(bass). Younger Tess O’ Devon.” George English
(i’ntonM 118 ‘ ,’3? T mage of Rose.” Phyllis Gibbs
i^-f, ano . > 4T „,Wnanelle. ’ Mulligan’s Musketeers,
refrain, “Mulligan’s Musketeers.” 10.40 p.m.: “Ar-
gus ’ information service. British official wireiess information
from Rugbv. Meteorological data. Highway
notes equipped by the Royal Car Membership of
Victoria. Bulletins. Weekly seasonable gar-
denmg reminders, equipped by Leslie Brunning.
10.50 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces. “Ups and Downs”
(Rose). “Mississippi Mud” (Harris). “Day
Goals’ (Hallam). 114 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
~™a nnlne (Gilbert), “Dream Home” (Fox).
Ra £’ (Moore). “That is My Weak spot Now”
(Stept). “Get Out and Get Below the Moon”
(Tobias). “(Sleepy Child” (Kahn). “The Prune Track”
(Crpmit). “Sincerely I Do” (Davis). “Sally Rose”
(Good friend). “Good-night Waltz” (Bibo). “Good-night
Refrain.” 11.40 p.m.; God Save the King.
3AR
». MORNING SESSION
10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock says “Ten.” 10.1 a.m.:
“Age” Inventory Alternate studies; London steel mar-
ket; “Age” market studies—farm and station pro-
duce, fruit, fish, greens, and many others. 10.25 a.m.: “Age”
Transport studies; ocean forecasts.. 10.30 a.m.; Mail
ftotlces; specific prepare data. 10.35 a.m.:
Age’ information serving, unique to 3AR. 10.59 a.m,:
Climate forecast. 11 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces—“ Please Inform Me” (Miller), “A Stolen Melody”
(Fisher), “Sunshine” (Belin). 11.10 a.m.; Vocalvivacl-
ty. 11.15 a,m,: Ned Tyrrell’s Radl-o-Aces—“Bought a Huge
Date with a Little Woman” (Tobias), “Jeannine” (Gil-
berts), “Dream Home” (Fox). 11.25 a.m.: Vocai
vivacity. 11,30: Ned Tyrrell’s Radl-o-Aces —“Chiqui-
ta” (Wayne), “I’m Gonna Settle Up” (Frich), “Take
You To-morrow” (Razay). 11.40 a.m,: Vocal viva-
metropolis. 11.45: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Fortunate in
Love” (Henderson), “The Finest Issues in Life Are
Free” (Henderson), “Sleepy Child” (Tierney). 11.55
a.m.: Vocal vivacity. 12 midday: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-
o-Aces —“The Kin-kijou” (Tierney), “Rio Rita”
(Tierney), “I’m Sorry, Sally” (Kahn). 12.10 p.m,:
Vocal vivacity. 12.15 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces—“A Little Change of Ambiance” (Brown),
“I Wanna Go Voon Voon Voo” (Brown), “Down
upon the Sands” (Hamy), 12,25 p.m.: British offi-
cial wi-fi information; bulletins. 12.35 p.m.:
Vocal vivacity. 12.40 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces —“Mallika” (Reel), “You Mentioned Good-night, however
You Meant Goodbye” (Kahn), “The Desert Track”
(Romberg). 12.50 p.m.: Vocal vivaeity. 12.55 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces— 1 “One Alone” (Romberg),
“Meet Me To-day” (Dean), “As soon as Once more (Lums-
tlaine), 1.5 p.m.: Vocal vivacity. 1.10 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Drained Fingers” (Woods),
“Too Busy” (Miller). “Candy Sue, Simply You” (To-
bias). 1.20 p.m.; Vocal vivacity. 1,23 p.m.: Ned
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“ln a Bamboo Backyard” (Don-
aldson). “Something You Say” (Donaldson). 1.30
p.m.: “God Save the King,”
EVENING SESSION
6 p.m.: Candy solace from the Seraphina. 8.5
p.m.: Outcomes of the Sheffield Protect cricket match,
South Australia v. New South Wales, at Adelaide.
NIGHT SESSION
8.13 p.m.: Do you know that? 8,15 0.m.. Eric
E. Aikens —“To-morrow’s Occasions on the Motordrome.
8.30 om.: Group singing—transmission from
the Metropolis Corridor. Ballarat. 10.30 p.m.: ‘Age information
service unique to 3AR; outcomes of Sheffield Protect
cricket. South Australia V, New South Wales, at
Adelaide 10 40 p.m,: “God Save the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
7.43 a.m.: Time indicators, 7.45 a.m.: Information service.
Eight Zero a.m.: Some electrical information. 8.15 a.m.: Information ser-
vice 8.30 a.m,: Shut down,
MORNING SESSION.
13.0, a.m.: Music. 11,5 a.m.: Social information. ,4715
o. : Lecturette, a cookery and family speak by
“The Etiouette Woman.” 11,30 a.m,: Music. 11,35 a.m.:
Extra social information, 11.45 a.m,: From the Winterear-
den Theatre. Wurlitzer organ. 12,0 (midday): Shut
down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
1 Zero p.m.: Market studies and climate data.
I.2ft p.m.: From the Paris Cafe, lunch-hour music.
2.Zero yr,m,: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero pun.: A programme of electrically-reproduced
information. 3.30 p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances. 3.31
pm,: From St. John’s Cathedral, a recital by Mr.
George Sampson, F.R.C.O. (Metropolis Organist). 4.Zero p.m,:
Afternoon information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down,
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.C* p.m.: Mall prepare operating instances; mail informa-
tion, transport information. 6.5 p.m,: Dinner music. 6.25
p. Industrial bulletins. 6.30 p.m.: Mattress-
time tales, performed by “The Sandman.” 7.0
p.m.: Information ih temporary, 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate information.
7.® p.m.: Metallic quotations, 7.7 p.m.; Market studies.
7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate
data. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins, 7.43 p.m.:
Commonplace time indicators. 7,45 p.m,:- To-morrow’s sport-
ing fixtures reviewed.
NIGHT SESSION.
Half I.—“ The Virginians.” A pot-pourri of in-
strumental music, by “The Virginians,” (Conductor,
Goldie Holmes.) 8.Zero p.m.: From the studio, the
Virginians, absurdity rag, “The Booster” (Lake).
8.Four pm.: Goldie Holmes, trumpet solo, “The Jazza-
pat n” (Weidoft), 8.7 p.m.: The Virginians,” a hen
dialog, “The Fowl and the Saxophone.” 844
pm.. Ray Fitter, saxophone solo, “Rhapsodium”
(Cosmey). 848 p.m.: The Virginians, fox-trot,
“Drifting and Dreaming” (Courtis), 8.21 p.m.: Vince
Ball, trombone solo, “Miss Trombone” (Filmore).
8.25 p.m.: The Virginians, hen suite, “A Day in a
Florida Woodland” (Ring Hager), Half 1: Within the
early morning the air is moist and the birds sing
to an empty world. The chimes wake males to exercise
and the day begins. Half 2: Within the deeper woodland
the palms sway and a bunch of feathered singers
make an entrancing valse symphony. Half 3: The
mill clacks. One lone hen calls and sings a cadenza
to its mate, A crow is heard and a canine barks. Two
pictures ring out, and a brief finale ends the seene.
8?2 p.m,: George Janks (pianist), “Lopeziana”
f Lopez). 8,35 p.m.; The Virginians, Oriental fox-
trot, “Jazzorient” (Gold). 8.39 p,m.: Two
Virginians, saxophone and trumpet oddity,
“Bushes” (Hahn), 8,44 p.m.: Ethel Barber
(violor.iste), “The Gypsy’s Wooing” (Trin-
kaus), 8,50 p.m.: The Virginians, fox-trot, “Toreador
Humoresque” (Lake). 8.55 p.m.: Metropolitan climate
forecast. 8.56 p.m.: Week-end highway data for
motorists, formally equipped by the Royal Car
Membership of Queensland. Half II.: Anglo Male Quar-
tette. ST4O p,m.: From the studio, a programme by
trie Anglo Male Quartette:—Anglo Quartette, “Solely
This” (Parks). C. R. Kolb (tenor), “On Wings of
Track’ (Mendelssohn). Dick Pike (bass), “The Lute
Participant (Allitsen). Anglo Quartette, “Southern
Reminiscences” (Bergquest). c. R. Kolb and Dick Pike,
vocal duet, “The Moon Hath Raised” (Benedict).
A. P Stoddart (baritone), “Sea Life” (Sanderson).
Anglo Quartette, “Go Ask Papa” (Parks), “Two
Plies’ (Parks). Half lll.—Gramophone recital, 9.40
pm.: A brief recital of electrically-reproduced re-
coras. 10.Zero p.m.: The “Every day Mail” information; the
Courier information, climate information. Shut down,
SCL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: G. R. Lamprell. 11 a.m.: G.P.O.
chimes. li.i a.m.; A army band live performance—St.
Hild Colliery Worth Band—“ Queens of the West”
(Rimmer), “Avondale” (Vernon); Royal Guards
Band, ‘Romeo and Juliet.” 11.15 a.m.; “Econom-
ist,” kitchen craft and menu speak. 11.30 a.m.:
Vocal, instrumental, and orchestral selections- Ger-
trude Johnson, soprano, “Jewell Track” from
Faust”, Arthur Catterall, violin, “Allegro Aperto”
(First Half), “Allegro Aperto” (Continued). 12.15
p.m.: Information session. 12.40 p.m.: From Adelaide
Oval description of the inter-state cricket match,
New South Wales v. South Australia. 12.50 p.m.:
South Australian Railway data. 12.51 p.m.:
S- =9′ and Co.’s Inventory Alternate data.
32.07 p.m.: Meteorological data. 1 p.m.:
G.P.O. Chimes. 1.1 p.m: Description of the inter-
state cricket match, New South Wales v. South
Australia. 1,12 p.m.: From the studio—the Metron-
ola Dance Band, “Put, Your Arms The place They Be-
lengthy,” “A Night time in June,” “My Ohio Residence,” “Aspect
by Aspect.’ 1.24 p.m.: Description of the inter-
state cricket match, New South Wales v. South
Australia 1.10 p.m.: Beatrice Kingston, soubrette,
“Are You Pondering of Me To-night?” (Davis), “The
Lilac Tree” (Gartlan). 1.2 p.m.: Metronoia Dance
Band—“ Cock-a-doodle,” “Oh, Doris, The place Do You
Dwell?” “Ramona.” 1.48 p.m.: Beatrice Kingston,
soubrette—“Persian Rug” (Kahn), “Nauraska” (Sis-
sle). 1.5,6 p.m.: Inter-State cricket scores. 1.58
p.m,; Meteorological data. 2 p.m.: G.P.O.
chimes and shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: j. L. Norris. Three p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
3.1 p.m.: Description of the inter-state cricket
match, New South Wales v. South Australia. 3.12
p.m.: Jean Finlay, pianiste, chosen pianoforte
items. 3.15 p.m,: Diana Belmont, contralto —
“Forethought” (Lambert), “Caprice” (Furrell). 3.21
p.m.: Gwen Moss, violiniste —“Berceuse” (Ilynshi),
“Serenata” (Moszkowski). 3.27 p.m.; Description
of the inter-State cricket match, New South Wales
v. South Australia.’ 3.47 p.m.: Gertrude Grey,
mezzo—“ Prayer” (Hiller), “When Thy Blue Eyes”
(Lassen). 3.53 p.m.: Description of the inter-State
cricket match, New South Wales v. South Australia.
Four p.m.- G.P.O. chimes. 4.1 p.m.: Diana Belmont,
contralto*—“Beloved Sleep” (Slates), “The Every day
(Query’’ (Helmond). 4.6 p.m.: Gwen Moss, vio-
liniste—“Hymn to the Solar” (Korsakoff), “Le Tam-
bourin de la Reine” (Moffat), 4.12 p.m.: Gertrude
Grey, mezzo—“ Since First I Noticed Your Face,” “I
Attemyt from Like to Illness” (Purcell). 4.18
p.m.: Description of the inter-State match. New
South Wales v. South Australia. 4.30 p.m.: Colum-
bia recordings—-London String Quartet —”Quartet in
D Minor,” “Andante Con Moto,” “Scherzo-Allegro
Molto,” “Presto” (First Half), “Presto” (Concluded).
4.45 p.m.: Description of the inter-State cricket
match, New South Wales v. South Australia. 4.55
p.m.: S C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Alternate infor-
mation 5 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes and shut down.
EVENING SESSION
5.50 p.m.: Description of the inter-State cricket
match, New South Wales v. South Australia. 6
p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 6.1 p.m.: Youngsters’s glad
moments—birthday greetings, correspondence, songs,
and tales by “Miss Wi-fi.” 6.30 p.m.: Inter-
lude of dinner music on the Sonora. 7 p.m.: G.P.O.
chimes. 7.1 p.m,: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Ex-
change data. 7.5 p.m.: Basic market re-
ports. 7.Eight p.m.: 5CL’s sporting service, by “Sil-
vios.” 7.20 p.m. “Willow,” a resume on the cricket.
7.30 p.m.: Columbia recordings;—Oliver King, bass-
baritone. “Come, Let Us Be Merry” (Wilson), “Be-
ware of the Maidens” (Day); Lou Alter, pianist,
’Who” from “Sunny,” “Sunny” from “Sunny”; Courtroom
Symphony Orchestra, “Endurance” choice. 7.45
p.m.: P. H. Nicholls. Eight p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 8.1
p.m.: Holden’s Silver Band, “Track of Australia,”
choice “Rigoletto.” 8.13 p.m,: Gertrude Grey,
mezzo, “Pierrot” (Dagman), “The Coronary heart Worships”
(Gustav). 8.19 p.m.: James Glennon, violinist—
“ Meditation” (Massenet), “Swing Track” (Barnes).
0.25 p.m.: Jack Burgess, songs on the piano—“ For
My Sweetheart,” “There Should Be a Silver Lining.”
8.31 p.m.: Holden’s Silver Band—march, “Gladiator’s
Farewell”; waltz, “Monastery Bells”; two-step, “Peace
with Victory.” 8.41 p.m.: Diana Belmont, contralto
—“The Moon Drops Low” (Cadman), “Far Off l
Hear a Lover’s Flute” (Cadman). 8.47 p.m.: Paul
Jeacel, saxophonist, choices from his repertoire.
8.53 p.m.: Denis Sheard, tenor—“ Caro Mio Ben,’
“Come to the Honest.” 9 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes. 9.1
p.m.: Meteorological data. 9.2 p.m.: Over-
seas grain report. 9.Three p.m.: Gertrude Grey, mezzo
—‘My Process” (Ashford), “Fleurette” (M’Gooch),

9.9 p.m.: Holden’s Silver Band–Intermezzo, “De-
morsille Stylish”; -‘On a Sunday Morn.” 9.19 p.m.:
Jack Burgess, songs on the piano—“ Muddy Waters,’’
“There’s One Little Woman Who Loves Me.” 9.25
p.m.: James Glennon, violinist —”Adagietto” from
Suite (Bizet), “Angus Dei” from Suite (Bizet). 9.31
p.m.: Diana Belmont, contralto—” The White Daybreak
is Stealing” (Cadman), “From the Land of the Sky-
blue Waters” (Cadman). 9.37 p.m.: Holden’s Silver
Sand—march, “Marche Militaire.” 9.43 p.m.: Gert-
impolite Grey, mezzo—“ Had been I Thy Bride,” “When
Maiden Loves.” 9.49: Paul Jeacle, saxophonist—
choices from his repertoire. 9.55 p.m.: Denis
Sheard tenor—“ Cute,” “A Spirit: Flower.” 10.1
p.m.: Holden’s Silver Band—Orientale, “Down in
China City”; patrol, “Paddy’s Patrol”; quickstep.
“Washington Grays.” 10.15 p.m.: “The Advertiser”
basic information service. 10.20 p.m.: British official
wi-fi information. 10.22 p.m.: 5CL’s sporting service
by “Sitvius.” 10.33 p.m.: By courtesy of 3LO, Mel-
bourne, trendy dance numbers by the well-known
Radi-o-Aces, 11.10 p.m.: “God save the King.’
6WF
12.30 p.m.: Tune in. 12.35 p.m.: Markets, information,
and cables. 1 p.m.: Time sign. 1.1 p.m.: Climate
notes equipped by the Meteorological Bureau of
West Australia; station bulletins. 1.2 p.m.:
The Studio Quintette, performed by Mr. Val Smith,
will play choices from their repertoire, 2 p.m.:
Shut down. 3.30 p.m.: Tune in. 3.35 p.m.: After-
midday tea live performance relayed from the Rosebud Cate,
Perth—vocal and instrumental interludes from the
studio. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down. 6.45 p.m.: Tune in.
6 48 p.m.: Musical session for the kiddies by Uncles
Henry, Percy, and Duffy, and Aunties Amy and
Audrey. 7.5 p.m.: Gadgets by the Studio Trio. 7.30
p.m.: Shares, markets, information. 7.45 p.m.: Pacing
speak. Eight p.m.: Time sign. 8.1 p.m.: Climate notes
equipped by the Meteorological Bureau of West
Australia; station bulletins such .as additions
to programmes, and many others. 8.Three p.m.: Musical programme
from the studio, together with vocal and instrumental
artists ■ objects by the Instrumental Duo of the
S.S. Katoomba. 9 p.®.: Late information; ships inside
vary announcement; climate report and forecast;
station bulletins, similar to additions to pro-
grammes, and many others. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down. 104.5 metre
transmission: Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5
metrqes of programme given on 1250 metres, com-
mencing at 6.45 p.m.
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSION.
U.3C a.m.: Musical choices. 11.34 a.m.: Climate
data. 11.35 a.m.: Musical choices. 11.55
bm ; Tasmanian stations’ 9 a.m. climate report.
12 midday: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 12.1 p.m.:
Sint Ding data; ships inside wi-fi vary;
maT notices; housewives’ information. 12.Eight p.m.: Musical
choices. 12.11 p.m.: British official wi-fi information.
12.20 p.m.: Musical choices. 12.29 p.m.: Announce-
ments 12.33 p.m.: Information service; produce gross sales held
at railway. 12.55 p.m.: Musical choices. 1.30 p.m.:
Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.:
Muf cai choices. 3.Four p.m.: Climate data.
Three 5 p.m.: Musical choices. 3.15 p.m.: Reminiscences oi
the Motherland. Cherniavsky Trio (violin, flute, and
harp) “To My Mom” (Voigt), “The Herd Woman s
Dream” (Labitsky). Alfred O’Shea (tenor), The
Low-backed Automotive” (Lover), “Molly Branningham
‘Stanford). The London Flute Quartette (varia-,
tions), “Scotch and Irish Airs” (Stainer). Rene
Male Quartet, “Church Scenes from the Outdated Residence-
stead,” “The Outdated People at Residence.” Kenneth Walters
baißcne), “The Village Blacksmith” (Lengthy), The
pi oral Dance” (Moss). William Thomas and quar-
tette, “Eileen Alannah,”’ “Love’s Personal Candy Track.”
Muriel Brunskill (contralto), “Kathleen Mavourneen”
(Ortwford), “O Beautiful Night time.” Eddie Thomas’ Col-
legians, “Until We Meet Once more” (Whiting), “Missouri”
(Logan). Alfred O’Shea (tenor), “Mom Machree.”
The Taylor Trio (violin, ’cello, and piano), “Silver
Threads Among the many Gold,” “’Tis the Final Rose of
Summer season.” 4.15 p.m.: Readings from the “Weekly
Cornier,” “What Energetic Males are Doing.” 4.30
p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.15 p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday greet-
ings, by “Uncle David.” 6.20 p.m.: Musical selec-
tions. ‘6.30 p.m.: Molly Horlock (12 years of age),
piano recital, “Minuet in G,” “A Backyard Dance.”
6.40 p.m.: Musical choices. 7.Zero p.m.: Request num-
bers for the youngsters.
EVENING SESSION.
7.15 p.m.: A. M. O’Leary will converse on “Cricket.”
730 p.m.: Orchestra. Claude Pross arid his “Gloom-
chastrs,” interspersed with gramophorie information—
Mary Ann,” “You’re a Actual Sweetheart,” “The
Desert Track,” “When You Performed the Organ,” “Let
a Smile be Your Umbrella,” “Moonlight on the
Ganges,” ’“Sundown on the St. Lawrence,” “Get Out
and Get Below the Moon,”’ “Tune in on Happiness.”
8.45 p.m.: J. M. Counsel, “A Musical Hour with the
Outdated Masters.” “The Historical past and Improvement of
Mus.c.” 9.50 p.m.: Information session. British official
wi-fi information. Readings from the “Weekly Courier.”
“Mercury” particular Tasmanian information service. Railway
suction produce gross sales, held at railway. Climate in-
formation. Hobart Inventory Alternate quotations. Royal
Autocar Membership of Tasmania highway information for the week-
finish. Notes by the Newbie Athletic Affiliation.
Biking notes, by the Hobart Biking Affiliation.
Market studies from Messrs. Roberts and Co. and
Messrs. Smart and Stirling. 10.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock
chimes the hour. 10.2 p.m.: God Save the King.
Shut down.
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P.34 – Native Programmes, Saturday, January 12[edit]

Native Programmes, Saturday, January 12
2FC SERVICE
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
7.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
7.5 a.m.: Studio music. 7.20 a.m.: Nation
session; official climate forecast; rainfall;
temperatures; astronomical memoranda;
transport intelligence; mail companies; river
leports. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market;
mining share market; steel quotations.
7.35 a.m.: Wool gross sales; breadstuff’s markets;
inter-State markets; produce markets.
7.45 a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” sum-
mary. 7.50 a.m.: Studio music. 8,Zero a.m.:
“Huge Ben.” Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
10.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte replica. 10.10
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information ser-
vice. 10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.:
Final-minute sporting data, by the
2FC Racing Commissioner. 10.40 a.m.:
Studio music. 10.45 a.m.: A Speak on “Gar-
, cening,” by J. G. Lockley (“Redgum”).
11.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben”; A.P.A. and Reuter’s
cable companies. 11.5 a.m.: Shut down
MIDDAY AND AFTERNOON SESSION.
(Announcers: Laurence Halbert and Ewart
Chappie.)
12.Zero Midday: “Huge Ben” and programme an-
nouncements. 12.2 p.m.: Inventory Alternate
data. 12.Four p.m.: Studio music. 12.10
p.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information ser-
vice. 12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
12.20 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania, play-
ed at Launceston. 1.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben”;
climate intelligence. 1.Three p.m.: “Night
Information” noon information service. 1.20 p.m.:
Studio music. Races: In the course of the after-
midday occasions at Moorefield will likely be described
by the 2FC Racing Commissioner. Cricket:
Scores of the England v. Tasmania match,
performed at Launceston, will likely be transmitted
as obtained. In the course of the intervals musical
objects will likely be given from the Studio. 4.45
p.m.: From the Studio: Full sporting
resume. 5.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Closedown.
>
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.)
6.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC.
5.45 p.m.: The kids’s session, performed
by the “Good day Man”; letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: Music and leisure.
6.40 p.m.: Climate intelligence; transport;
Inventory Alternate.
6.45 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information.
6.50 p.m.: Sporting information; late information and
studio music.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartette, con-
ducted by Horace Keats—
(a) “Love Evermore” (Burnet).
(b) “Cradle Track” (Schubert).
(c) “The Blue Paradise” (Romberg),
id) “Ave Maria” (Schubert).
EVENING SESSION.
(Announcer: Laurence Halbert.)
(Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.)
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte replica.
7.52 p.m.: Common music.
8.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” From the City Corridor:
Organ recital, organized by Ernest Truman.
8.Zero p.m.: From the Studio: Climate report
and forecast.
9.1 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
9.Eight p.m.: Vincent Aspey, violinist.
9.15 p.m.: A sketch by Zena and James Ken-
dall.
9.27 p.m.: Amy Firth, soprano.
9.34 p.m.: From the Wentworth: The Went-
price Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath the
path of Jimmy Elkins.
9.44 p.m.: From the Studio: John Mitchell,
tenor.
9.51 p.m.: Vincetn Aspey, violinist.
JO.O p.m.: “Huge Ben”; Zena and James Ken-
dall in a sketch.
10.12 p.m.: Amy Firth, soprano. •
10.19 p.m.: From the Wentworth: The Went-
price Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath the
path of Jimmy Elkins.
10.29 p.m.: From the Studio: Late climate
forecast.
10.30 p.m.: Len Maurice within the latest track
hits.
10.37 p.m.: From the Wentworth: The Went-
price Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath the
path of Jimmy Elkins.
10.57 p.m.: From the Studio: To-morrow’s
programme.
10.58 p.m.: Len Maurice within the latest track
hits.
11.5 p.m.: From the Wentworth: The Went-
price Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath the
path of Jimmy Elkins.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.
2BL SERVICE
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropoli-
tan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
The chimes of the G.P.O. clock; information from
the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25
a.m.: Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: The chimes
of the G.P.O. clock; Studio music. 8.35
a.m.: Data, mails, transport, arrivals,
departures, and sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information
from the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.45
a.m.: The chimes of the G.P.O. clock,
Studio music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; Studio music. 9.30 a.m.: Half
an hour with silent mates. 10 a.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes; shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcers: A. C. C. Stevens, J. Knight
Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes. Girls’s
Session performed by Mrs. Cranfield:
“What’s on on the Footage and Theatres.”
11.30 a.m.: Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.:
Girls’s Session continued.. 12 midday:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular ocean
forecast and climate report. 12.Three p.m.:
Studio music. 12.30 p.m.: “The Solar” information
service. 12.40 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania,
performed in Tasmania. 12.48 p.m.: Music.
1.30 p.m.: “The Solar” noon information ser-
vice. 1.40 p.m.: Studio music. 1.57 p.m.:
Cricket scores. 2 p.m.: G.P. clock and
chimes; shut down.
Be aware.—In the course of the afternoon race outcomes
from Moorefield, and pony outcomes will likely be
transmitted as obtained by courtesy of “The
Solar” newspapers.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: The Chimes of the G.P.O. clock;
cricket scores, England v. Tasmania, performed
in Tasmania. 3.47 p.m.: Studio music.
3.50 p.m.: Romano’s Dance Orchestra, con-
ducted by Bennie Abrahams. 4.0: The
chimes of the G.P.O. clock; from the stu-
dio, Thelma Lovett, soprano. 4.Four p.m.:
The Comfortable Trio, instrumentalists. 4.14
p.m.: “Solar” information service. 4.20 p.m.: Ro-
mano’s Dance Orchestra, performed by
Bennie Abrahams. 4.30 p.m.: Thelma
Lovett, Soprano. 4.34 p.m.: The Comfortable
Trio, instrumentalists. 4.44 p.m.: “Solar”
information service; cricket scores. 4.50 p.m.:
Romano’s Dance Orchestra, performed by
Bennie Abrahams. 5 p.m.: The chimes of
the G.P.O. clock; from the studio, the
Comfortable Trio, instrumentalists 5.10 p.m.:
“Solar” information service. 5.20 p.m.: Common
music. 5.27 p.m.: Sporting and racing
resume. 5.27 p.m.: Options of the even-
ing’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s session—music and en-
tertainment.
6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information service.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet —
(a) “Apple Blossoms”. (Jacobi-Kriesler).
(bi “Bolero” (Moskowski-Boston).
(c) “The Cabaret Woman” (Kern),
(d) “Barcarolle” (Offenbach),
(e) “The Blue Danube” (Strauss).
7.10 p.m.: Full sporting and racing re-
sume.
7.30 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam in adver-
tising talks and nonsense.
7.55 p.m.: Programme and different announce-
ments.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
“The Merry-Makers,”
A glowing radio-revue, full of the
drollest quips and the latest track hits.
Dance music from Romano’s, and between
dance teams, the most recent information will likely be given
by courtesy of the “Solar” Newspaper.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem.
Shut down.
2GB
5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s Hour, performed by
Uncle Jacn. 6.30 p.m,: Shut down. 7 to 10:
Musical programme.’ Shut down.
2UW
5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s session, by Uncle
George. 7.15 p.m.: Music. 7.20 p.m.:
Dance programme. 8.Zero p.m.: Request
night. 9.Zero p.m.: Grown-up bedtime
tales. 10.Zero p.m.: Shut down.
2GB
Friday, January 11.
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness
speak, by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music
10.30 a.m.: Girls’s session, by Miss Helen
J. Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.0
p.m.: Music. 2.5 p.m.: Girls’s radio ser-
vice, by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m.:
Music. 3.Zero p.m.: Speak. 3.15 p.m.: Shut
down. 5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s session, by
Uncle George. 7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and mar-
ket studies, by New Zealand Mortgage and
Mercantile Company, Ltd. 7.15 p.m.: Music
8.Zero p.m.: 2GB Instrumental Trio —Miss
Ada Brook, Mr. Cecil Berry, Mr. Cedric
Ashton. 8.15 p.m.: Songs, by Miss Nance
Marley. 8.25 p.m.: A humorous interlude,
by Mr. Jack Win and Mr. Heath Burdock.
8.30 p.m.: ’Cello solos, by Mr. Cedric Ash-
ton. 8.40 p.m.: Songs, by Signor Mario
Gustimo. 8.50 p.m.: Pianoforte solos, by
Miss Ada Brook. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate re-
port. 9.Three p.m.: Deal with. 9.15 p.m.: Songs,
by Miss Nance Marley. 9.25 p.m.: 2GB In-
strumental Trio. 9.40 p.m.: A humorous
interlude. 9.45 p.m.: Songs, by Signor
Mario Gustino. 9.55 p.m.: Violin solos, by
Mr. Cecil Berry. 10.5 p.m.: Orchestral
music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down.

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P.36 – Interstate Programmes, Saturday, January 12[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Saturday, January 12
3LO
EARL* MORNING SESSION
7.15 am.: Morning melodies. 7.20 a.m.; Morning
workouts to music. 7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies, mar-
ket studies, basic information, snipping* and sporting in-
formation. Eight a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time
sign. 8.1 p.m.: Morning melodies 8.15 a.m.
Shut down.
MORNING SESSION
11 a.m.: Eric Welch will converse on to-day’s races
at Epsom 11.10 a.m.: The station orchestra —“First
Masaique” (Mozart). 11.20 a.m.: Syd. Hollister,
comic—“ Sketches.” . 11.27 a.m.: Jessie Shmith,
contralto—“lf Thou Wert Blind” (Noel Johnstone),
“Nothing however Love” (Jacobs-Bond). ’11.34 a.m.:
The station orchestra—choice, “Hit the Deck’
(Youmans). 11.44 a.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano
11.51 a.m.: The station orchestra. 12 midday: Mel-
bourne Observatory time sign; specific prepare in-
formation. 12.1 p.m.: Metals costs, obtained by
the Australian Mines and Metals Affiliation from
the London Inventory Alternate at the present time; British official
wi-fi information from Rugby; Reuter’s and the Aus-
tralian Press Affiliation .cables; “Argus” information ser-
vice.
MID-DAY SESSION
12.20 p.m.: The station orchestra —excerpts from
“Delibes.” 12.30 p.m.: Keith Desmond, elocutionist,
will give a brief recital. 12.37 p.m.: Inventory Ex-
change data. 12.40 p.m.: Percy Cole, trum-
pet—chosen. 12.47 p.m.: Syd. Hollister, comic—.
“Simply Run.” 12.54 p.m.: The .station orchestra—
“Le Puits d’Amour” (Balfe). 1.Four p.m.: Jessie
Shmith, contralto —“I’m a’Longin’ for You” (Hatha-
means), “I Love You Extra” (Lee). 1.11 p.m.: The
orchestra—overture, “Masanielle” (Auber).
1.16 p.m.: Meteorological data; climate fore-
solid for Victoria, South Australia, New South Wales,
and Tasmania; ocean forecasts; river studies; rain-
fall. 1.22 p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano—“Music
When Smooth Voices Die” (Besley), “Till” (Sander-
son). 1.29 p.m.: The station orchestra—suite, “L’lle
des Charges” (Popy). 1.39 p.m.: Keith Desmond, elo-
cutionist. will give a brief recital.
AFTERNOON SESSION
3.13 p.m.: Description of Open Handicap, b fur
longs; Epsom races, by Eric Welch. 2.20 p.m.:
Description of pennant cricket match, Richmond v.
Prahran, at Richmond, by Rod M’Gregor. 2.43
p.m.*. Description of Trial Plate, 6 furlongs, at Ep-
som races. 2.50 p.m.: Description of pennant cric-
ket match. 3.13 p.m.: Description of Brush Stee-
plechase, 2 miles 15 chains, at Epsom races. 3.20
p.m.: Description of pennant cricket match. 3.43
p.m.: Description of Epsom Handicap, 1 mile, at
Epsom races. 3.50 p.m.: Description of pennant
cricket match. Four p.m.: Sonora recital. 4.15 p.m.:
Description of Trial Purse, 6 furlongs, at Epsom
races. 4.20 p.m.: Description of pennant cricket
match. 4.45 p.m.: Description of Welter Handicap,
1 mile, at Epsom races. 4.50 p.m.: Description of
pennant cricket match. 5 p.m.: Information service;
through the afternoon progress scores within the cricket
match, England v. Tasmania, at Launceston, additionally
within the Sheffield Protect cricket match, New South
Wales v South Australia, in Adelaide, will likely be broad-
solid as they arrive handy. 5.10 p.m.: Description
of pennant cricket match. 6 p.m:: Stumps drawn.
EVENING SESSION
5.50 p.m.: Sporting outcomes. 6 p.m.: Solutions to
letters and birthday greetings by “Little Miss Koo-
kaburra.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30
p.m.: “Little Miss Kookaburra” will inform the tiny
ones about “Nellie and Billie in Moonland.”
NIGHT SESSION
6.50 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data. 7 p.m.:
River studies; market studies by the Victorian Professional-
ducers’ Co-operative Co., Ltd.; poultry, grain, hay,
straw, jute, dairy produce, potatoes, and onions;
market studies of fruit by the Victorian Fruitgrow-
ers’ Affiliation; wholesale costs of fruit by the
Wholesale Fruit Retailers’ Affiliation; citrus
fruits. 7.15 p.m.: Information session—stumps scores,
pennant cricket match. 7.28 p.m.: Birthday greet-
ings. 7.30 p.m.: Out of the previous. 7.31 p.m.:
Frederick Chapman, A.L.S., F.G.S., Commonwealth
Falaeontclcgist, “Notes on the Geology of the Angle-
sea Coast” (100th speak). 7.45 p.m.: A Maker of
Historical past. 7.46 p.m.: Dr. J. A. Leach, “Magpie-
Larks.” 8.1 p.m.: Programme bulletins;
Tasmanian letter to 3LO from “The Courier,” Laun-
ceston. 8.5 p.m.: The station orchestra—choice
“Giaconda” (Ponchielli). 8.10 p.m.: John D. Fraser,
baritone —“Excessive on the Sleep Hills” (Loughborough),
“Star Eyes” (Speaks). , 8.17 p.m.: The station or-
chestra—“ Andante from. Sonata, Op 7” Grieg), se-
lected. 8.27 p.m.: The Radio Melody Makers—
Mr. Frederick
Chapman, whose
speak on geology
from 3LO to-
evening is the
hundredth he
has broadcast.
“Thirty Minutes of Melody.” 8.57 p.m.: The sta-
tion orchestra. 9.Four p.m.: The track characteristic of the
week. 9.8: Syd. Hollister, comic —“In Merry
Temper.” 9.15 p.m.: Eric Welch will describe to-
evening’s occasions on the Stadium. 9.30 p.m.: John D.
Fraser, baritone—“ The Blind Ploughman,” “My
Mary Candy and Brown.” 9.37 . p.m.: The station
orchestra 9.44 p.m.: Thelma Prepared, banjo 9.50
p.m.: Eric Welch will once more describe to-night’s occasions
on the Stadium. 10.5 p.m.:, Constance Flavel, so-
prano–“ May Light Shepherd,” “April Track’
10.12 p.m.: Station orchestra—overture, “Son and
Stranger” (Mendelssohn). 10.22 p.m.: Syd. Hol-
lister, comic—“ Potted Humor.” 10.29 p.m.:
Thelma Prepared, banjo. 10.36 p.m.: Constance Flavel,
soprano—“ Bid Me Discourse” (Bishop), “So daran
Rose” (Arditi). 10.43 p.m.: The station orchestra.
10.53 p.m.: Late sporting. 10.59 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces —“Googily Goo” (Davis), ’Guess Who’s in
City’ (Bazalf), “That Stolen Melody” (Fisher),
’Lenora” (Gilbert), “Chioe” (Kahn), “That’s What
You Imply to Me” (Davis), “L’azy Ft” piano solo
Masman), “Simply Like a Melody Out of the Sky”
(Donaldson), “Beloved” (Kahn), ’As a result of My Child
Don’t Imply Possibly Now” (Donaldson), “I Like to
Dunk a Hunk of Sponge Cake” (Castill), “Rain”
(Ruby), “Ramona” (Wayne), “Clarinet Marmalade’
(Fergus), “Nebraska” (Revel), Ceaselessly Extra” (Bur-
web,). 11.40 p.m.: “God Save the King.”
3AR
MORNING SESSION
10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock says “Ten.” 10.1 a.m..
“Age” Inventory Alternate studies—London steel mar-
tlet; “Age” market studies—farm and station pro-
duce, fruit, fish, greens, and many others. 10.25 a.m.: Man
transport studies; ocean forecasts. 10.30 a.m.: Mail
notices; specific prepare data 10.35 a.m.:
“Age” information service, unique to 3AR. 10.69 a.m.:
Climate forecast. 11 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-
Aces—“ Lonely Acres” (Robinson), “Shake It Down’
(Williams), “Subsequent to You, I Like Me Subsequent to You
(Bito). 11.10 a.m.: Vocal gems. 11.15 a.m.: Ned
Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“What Was I to Do?” (Reid),
“Chinatown” (Yvain), “The Riff Track” (Romberg).
11.25 a.m.: Vocal gems. 11.30 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces—“The Dance of the Blue Danube”
fFisher), “A Lonesome Boy’s Rosary” (Tobias),
“Excessive Up on a Hill Ton” (Baer). 11.40 a.m.: Vocal
gems. 11.43 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Tel)
Me Once more” (Clark), “Up and Down” (Rose), “Mis-
sissippi Mud” (Harris), Lolita” (Stoneham). 11.55
a.m,: British official wi-fi information; charges of trade
as equipped by Messrs. Thomas Cook dinner and Sons. 12
midday: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Three p.m.: Johnston’s Studio Boys—March, ‘Am-
phion”; “Japanese Romance”; march, “The Out-
publish.” 3.15 p.m.: Vocal variations. 3.25 p.m.:
Johnston’s Studio Boys —choice, “Faust.” 3.Three b
p.m.: Vocal variations. 3.45 p.m.: Johnston’s Stu-
dio Boys—choice, “Veronique,” 3.55 p.m.: Vocal
variations. 4.5 p.m.: Johnston’s Studio Boys—sere-
nade, “Moonlight”; novelty trombone, “Sliding Jim.”
4.15 p.m.: Vocal variations. 4.25 p.m.: Johnstons
Studio Boys—choice, “Basic Gems.” 4.35 p.m.:
Vocal variations. 4.45: Johnston’s Studio Boys—
‘choice, “Schubert’s Works.” 4.55 p.m.: An-
nouncements. 5 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
6 p.m.: Candy solace from the Seraphina. 1.45
p.m.: Outcomes of Sheffield Protect cricket, South Aus-
tralia v New South Wales, at Adelaide.
NIGHT SESSION
8.30 p.m.: Prahran Metropolis Band—march, “The Sil-
ver Badge” (Rimmer); “Humoreske” (Dvorak). 8.Four b
p.m.: Keith Desmond—“ Vivid Bits.” 8.52 p.m.:
Prahran Metropolis Band—overture, ‘na Cazza Ladra
(Rossini); half, track, “Candy and Low” (Pinsuti),
9.2 p.m.: Vera Holgate Clarke (piano)—“Waltz in
A Plat, Op. 42” (Chopin), “Etude in P Minor
(Chopin), “Rhapsody G Minor” (Brahms). 9.15
p.m.: Prahran Metropolis Band —choice, “The Mikado
(Sullivan). 9.25 p.m.: Molly Mackay, soprano
“Blue Danube” (Strauss), “Hark, Hark, the Lark’
(Schubert). 9.32 p.m.: Prahran Metropolis Band—“ March
of the Mannikins” (Fletcher). 9.42 p.m.: Keith
Desmond-—Barcarole, “Tales of Hoffman” (Offen-
bach); “Brighter and Higher.” 9.49 p.m.: Prahran
Metropolis Band —valse, “Santa,” (Raymond), “Day
Goals” (Hollam). 9.59 p.m.: “Molly Mackay, so-
prano—“ Daffodil Gold” (Hodgson), “All over the place r
Look” (Carew). 10.6 p.m.: Prahran Metropolis Band-
choice, “The Desert Track” (Romberg); march,
“The Commonwealth” (Rimmer). 10.20 p.m.: Information
session—“ Age” information service, unique to 3AR; an-
nouncements. 10.30 p.m.: “God Save the King.’
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
743 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information service.
8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical information. 8.15 a.m.: Information
service. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
From the racecourse, an outline of the races.
Gadgets from the studio and the Tivoli Theatre will
be relayed between races. 5.Zero p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION. *
6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances. Particular
“Queenslander” bi-weekly information service for distant
listerers. 6.30 p.m.: Bedtime tales, performed by
“Uncle Ben.” 7.15 p.m.: To-day’s race ends in
temporary. 7.20 p.m.: Basic sporting notes. 7.30 p.m.:
Crusing notes, by Mr. Fred Smith.
NIGHT SESSION.
8.Zero p.m.: Orchestral music. 8.15 p.m.: Motor-cycle
races. 8.45 p.m.: Orchestral music. 9.15 p.m.: Dance
music. 9.45 p.m.: Motor-cycle races. 10.Zero p.m.: The
“Sunday Mail” information, climate information. Shut down.
SCL
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: Athol Lykke. 11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O.
chimes. 11.1 a.m.: Final-minute choices of the
Victorian assembly by Mr. Eric Welch, of 3LO, Mel-
bourne. 11.5 p.m.: “Advertiser” basic information ser-
vice. ll.lt a.m.: British official wi-fi information. 11.15
a.m : A “Sonora” recital from studio, H.M.V. re-
cordings 12.Zero midday: G.P.O. chimes and shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
12.45 p.m.: Promenade Victoria Park Racecourse, posi-
tions and riders of the primary race, Licensed Victual-
lers assembly. 1.Zero p.m.: Promenade Victoria Park, a
operating description of first race by Mr. Arnold Tre-
ioar. 1.5 p.m.: Promenade studio. A musical interlude.
Trendy nance numbers by world well-known H.M.V.
dance orchestras. 1.25 p.m.: From Victoria Park
Racecourse, positions and riders of second race.
1.40 p.m.: Promenade Victoria Park Racecourse, a run-
ning descripticn of second race. 1.45 p.m.: Promenade
st.udio, vocal and instrumental numbers. Results of
Open Handicap at Epsom Races. 2.5 p.m.: Promenade
Racecourse. Riders and positions
of third race. 2.20 p.m.: From Victoria Park Race-
course. A operating description of third race. 2.26
P-hf-t, From Adelaide Oval. Inter-State cricket
N.S.W. v. S.A. 2.35 p.m.: From Victoria Park Race-
course, positions and riders of fourth race. 3.Zero p.m.:
From Victoria Park Racecourse, a operating descrip-
tion of the fourth race. 3.5 p.m.: Promenade Adelaide
Oval, mter-State cricket, N.S.W. v. S.A. 3.25 p.m.:
Promenade studio. Results of Epsom Handicap. 3.26 p.m.:
From Victoria Park Racecourse. A operating descrip-
tion of fifth race. 3.45 p.m.: Promenade Adelaide Oval,
mter-State cricket, N.S.W. v. S.A. 4.Four p.m.: Promenade
studio. Results of Trial Purse, 6 furlongs. 4.5 p.m.:
From Victoria Park Racecourse. Positions and riders
of sixth race. 4.20 p.m.: From Victoria Park Race-
course. A operating description of sixth race. 4.25
p.m.: Piom studio. Results of Welter Handicap, Ep-
som Races 4.26 p.m.: Promenade Adelaide Oval, inter-
state cricket. N.S.W. v. S.A. 4.45 p.m.: Promenade Vic-
toria Park Racecourse. Positions and riders of final
race. 4.50 p.m.: Resume of afternoon’s sporting.
5.Zero p.m : From Victoria Park Racecourse. A run-
ning description of final race. 5.10 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION.
5.50 p.m.: Promenade Adelaide Oval, inter-state cricket,
N.S.W v. S.A. 6.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. ’clock chimes. 6.1
p.m.: Resume of sporting. 6.10 p.m.: Birthday greet-
ings. Correspondence. Songs and tales. 6.40
p.m.: Dinner music. Sonora recital. 6.55 p.m.:
Inter-State cricket scores. 7.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
7 1 p.m.: S. C. Ward and Co.’s Inventory Alternate in-
formation. 7.5 p.m.: Basic market report. 7.8
o. Inter-State and worldwide cricket scores.
New South Wales v. South Australia, England v
Tasmania. 7.10 n.m.: Rev. G. E. Hale, B.A.
An Deal with on ‘The Poetry of Life.” 7.25 p.m.-
A resume of the day’s cricket by “Willow.” 7.35
p. C. G,. Riley. A chat ,on “Gadgets of Curiosity.”
7.47 p.m.: 5CL’s sporting service by “Silvius,” in-
cluding Epsom outcomes and Licensed Victuallers’
races.
NIGHT SESSION.
Announcer: J. L. Norris. 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.
8.1 p.m.: Metronola Dance Band in trendy dance
numbers. 8.6 p.m.: Hayden Male Quartet. “Two
Roses.” “Juanita.” 8.18 p.m.: Alan Kitson (enter-
tainer) in piano specialities. 8.18 p.m.: Diana Bel-
mont (contralto). “The Winds are Calling.” “Love,
I Have Received You.” 8.24 p.m.: Metronola Dance
Band in trendy dance numbers. 8.36 p.m.: Ger-
trude Grey (mezzo). “Now Sleeps the Crimson
Petal.” “Sylvan.” 8.42 p.m,: Metronola Dance
Band in trendy dance numbers. 8.50: Hayden
Male Quartette. “Candy and Low.”. “Beautiful Night time.”
9.2 p.m.: Alan Kitson (entertainer) in pianoforte
interpretations. 9.Eight p.m.: Diana Belmont (contralto).
“Down within the Forest.” “Prelude.” 9.14 p.m.:
Metronola Dance Band in trendy dance numbers.
9.24 p.m.: Will Runge (humorist) in chosen humor-
ous sketches. 9.34 p.m.: Metronola Dance Band
in trendy dance numbers. 9.40 p.m.: Gertrude Grey
(mezzo). “The Arrow and the Track.” “Huge Girl
Moon.” 9.46 p.m.: Will Runge (humorist) in
chosen humorous sketches. 9.56 p.m.: Metronola
Dance Band in trendy dance numbers. 10.15 p.m.:
5CL’s sporting service. 10.30 p.m.: Our good-night,
thought. “Manners are of extra significance than
legal guidelines, upon them in an amazing measure legal guidelines rely.”
10.31 p.m.: On with tjie dance. Promenade 3LO, Mel-
bourne, trendy dance numbers by the well-known
Radi-o-Aces. God Save the King.
Index to Interstate
Programmes
(3LO, 3AR, 4QG, SGL, 6WF, 7ZL.)
Fraiday, January 11 32
Saturday, January 12 • 36
Sunday, January 13 39
Monday, January Ilf, j f 2
Tuesday, January 15 lf6
Wednesday, January 16 50
Thursday, January 17 51,

6WF
12 midday: Tune in. 12.5 p.m.: Musical programme,
together with pianoforte choices by Miss Audrey Dean.
12.47 p.m.: Markets, information, and cables. 1 p.m.:
Time sign. 1.1 p.m.: Climate notes equipped by
the Meteorological Bureau of West Australia; sta-
tion bulletins. 1.2 p.m.: Shut down. 3.15
p.m.: Tune in. 3.20 p.m.: Racing outcomes and gen-
eral sporting information; musical programme from the
studio, together with vocal and instrumental numbers.
5.5 p.m.: Shut down. 6.45 p.m.: Tune in. 6.48 p.m.:
Tales for the kiddies by Uncle Duffy and the Radio
Fowl; fairy tales for the Tiny Tots by Auntie Amy.
7.5 p.m.: Sports activities outcomes. 7.30 p.m.: Markets, information,
and cables. 7.45 p.m.: Speak. Eight p.m.: Time sign.
8.1 p.m.: Climate notes equipped by the Meteorolo-
gical Bureau of West Australia; station announce-
ments, similar to additions to programmes, and many others. 8.3
p.m.: Musical programme from the studio, includ-
ing vocal and instrumental artists; dance music
by the Dance Symphonic Orchestra, relayed frpm
Temple Courtroom Cabaret. 9 p.m.: Late information; ships
inside vary announcement; climate report and fore-
solid; station bulletins. 10.30 p.m.: Shut
down. 104.5 metre transmission: Simultaneous
broadcast on 104.5 metres of programme given on
1250 metres, commencing at 6.45 p.m.
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSION.

i.3C a.m.
Choices by the Melody Masters. 11.34

a.in.: Particular midlands climate forecast. 11.35 a.m.:
Choices by the Melody Masters. 11.55 a.m.: Tas-
manian stations’ 9 a.m. climate report. 12 midday:
G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 12.1 p.m.: Transport
data; ships inside wi-fi vary; mail
notices; housewives’ information. 12.Eight p.m.: Choices by
the Melody Masters. 12.11 p.m.: British official wire-
much less information. 12,20 p.m.: Choices by the Melody
Masters. 12.29 p.m.: Bulletins. 12.30 p.m.:
Anticipations—3LO Melbourne commissioner’s last-
minute choices for the Melbourne races; additionally selec-
tions for Sydney races, by our particular consultant.
12.33 p.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters. 12,55
p.m.: “Mercury” information service. 1.10 p.m.: Choices
by the Melody Masters. 1.30, p.m.: Shut down.
2 15 p.m.: Working description of Two-year-old Han-
dle; p, run at Epsom racecourse, Epsom, Melbourne.
2.20 p.m.: Shut down. 2.45 p.m.: Working descrip-
tion of Epsom Plate, run at Epsom racecourse, Ep-
scm, Melbourne. 2.50 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.:
Cricket match, North-west v. Sandy Bay, described
by A. M. O’Leary. 3.15 p.m.: Working description
of Brush Steeplechase, run at Epsom racecourse,
Epsom, Melbourne. 3.20 p.m.: Cricket match. 3.45
p.m.: Working description of Epsom Handicap, run
at Epsom racecourse, Epsom, Melbourne. 3.50 p.m.:
Cricket match. 4.Zero p.m.: Choices by the Melody
Masters. 4.15 p.m.: Working description of Epsom
Purse, run at Epsom racecourse, Epsom, Melbourne.
4.20 p.m.: Cricket match. 4.45 p.m.: Working de-
s upturn of Apprentices’ Handicap, run at Epsom
racecourse, Epsom, Melbourne, 4.50 p.m.: All sport-
ing outcomes handy. 5.Zero p.m.: Shut down. 6.Zero p.m.:-
AU sporting outcomes handy.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.15 p.m.: Choices b” the Melody Masters. 6.45
p.m.: “Uncle David” will entertain the wee people.
7.Zero pm.: Solutions to letters and birthday greetings,
by “Uncle David.” 7.5 p.m.: Choices by the
Meiedy Masters. 7.15 p.m.: “Mercury” particular information.
Hobart Inventory Alternate quotations. To-day’s golf,
athletics, racing, cricket, “Mercury” late sporting
information. Outcomes of New City egg-laying competitors.
Homing and bowling.
EVENING SESSION.
7 30 p.m.: Roy Johnson will give a chat on “Guide
fra ning.” 7.45 p.m.: A gripping story of the ring,
•The fallen Star.” 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the
ncur. 8.6 p.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters.
8.30 p.m.: Transmission from the Continental, Mac-
quarie Avenue, Hobart. Theo Pipking and his Con-
tinental Orchestra —“After My Laughter Got here Tears”
(Turk), “Is It Gonna Be Lengthy” (Cowan), “One
Alone” (Romberg), “Lonesome within the Moonlight”
Biei), “Get Out and Get Below the Moon”
(Tobias), “Stunning” (Shay), “Sunshine” (Berlin),
“Rio Rita” (Tierney), “Chiquita” (Wayne), “Desert
Track” (Romberg), “My Angel” (Rapee), “It” (Rom-
berg), “The Man I Love” (Gershwin), “Let a Smile
Be Your Umbrella” (Pair), “Varsity Drag” (De
Syma), ‘Mary Ann” (Silver). 10.20 p.m.: Promenade the
studio, “Mercury” particular information service; ships inside
wi-fi vary; Tasmanian district climate report;
bowiing, homing, cricket, and tennis. 10.45 p.m.;
The Royal Autocar Membership of Tasmania security mes-
sage. 10.50 p.m.: Our Tasmanian good-night thought.
10.51 p.m.: God Save the King. 10.52 p.m.: Shut
down.
Subsequent Week’s Options
Look ahead to these options in subsequent
Meek’s “Wi-fi Weekly”: —
Mr. Don B. Knock will describe,
beneath the title, “Aerials ” the varied
varieties this essential portion of the
radio receiver takes. Zeppelin aerials,
two wire, single wire, cage aerials,
counterpoises, underground aerials,
body aerials, and many others., will likely be described.
Mr. Ray Allsop will describe how
super-power broadcasting would bene-
match Australia.

-0

P.37 – Farmer’s Advert[edit]

o
“SIX SIXTY”
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at Farmer s _
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tion of Radio —take nothing as a right! Solely
hear an indication. That’s all! One
minute’s listening will persuade you—will promote
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regrettable funding. The value is barely 45/-
Wi-fi Division , First Flooring Market Avenue.
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PITT, MARKET AND GEORGE STREETS, SYDNEY.

P.38 – Ferranti Advert[edit]

Don’t ship your “A”
Battery away to be
charged,
Cost it
Your self at Residence
PRICE

THE
w 1 r
BRITISH MADE
TRICKLE CHARGER
(Incorjporating the Westinghouse
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Easy and protected in operation
the Ferranti Trickle Charger
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Purchase a Ferranti
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P.38 – Native Programmes, Sunday, Jan. 13[edit]

Native Programmes, Sunday, Jan. 13
2FC
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
10 a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Studio music.
10.15 a.m.: Information service.
10.30 a.m.: Studio music.
11 a.m.: Morning service, broadcast from St.
Mark’s Church of England. Minister: Rev.
Canon E. Howard Lea.
12.15 p.m.: Approx. Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: C. R. Corridor.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32 p.m.: Cheer-up Society, performed by
Mr. Frank Grose.
Three p.m.: From the Lyceum. Programme
organized by the Central Methodist Mis-
sion.
Aiding Artists: Eleanor Statton, Lotys
Lescaut, “Brunette Trio.”
Doxology.
Prayer.
Contralto solo, Eleanor Stanton.
Women’ Trio, Brunette Trio.
Soprano solo, Lotys Lescaut.
Women’ trio, Brunette Trio.
Notices, Providing.
‘Australia’s Native Downside within the Pa-
cific,” Rev. J. W. Burton, M.A.
Acknowledgments.
Nationwide Anthem, Benediction.
4.30 p.m.: From the Studio,■ Recital of Sel-
ected Information.
5 p.m.: “Huge Ben”; shut down.
EVENING SESSION. 1
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
6 p.m.: “Huge Ben”; programme announce-
ments.
6.2 p.m.: Track recital by Ward Morgan in
affiliation with Daisy Richards, violiniste,
and Kathleen Roe, pianiste.
Songs: “The Minstrel” (Martin).
“And so I made a Vilanelle” (Scott).
Track of Creation,” from “Immortal Hour”
(Boughton).
WARD MORGAN. 1
Violin solos. “Introduction and Ist Transfer-
ment Scotch Phantasy” (Bruch)
“Praeludium and Allegro” (Kreisler)
DAISY RICHARDS.
•songs: “5 Eyes” (Gibbs),
flight it’s” (Wightman).
kesbury Highway.”
Randall” (Scott).
WARD MORGAN.
• rte solos, 32 Variations (Beeth-
I .
KATHLEEN ROE.
“Dusk at Sea” (Phillips).
~n as a Beautiful Flower” (Cathie).
Dirge.”
WARD MORGAN.
Violin solos:
“Viennese Melody” (by request), (Kreisler).
“Allegretto” (Kreisler).
DAISY RICHARDS.
Pianoforte solo:
“Prelude and Fugue” (Bach).
KATHLEN ROE.
6.55 p.m.: Night service, broadcast from
Pitt Avenue Congregational Church. Min-
ister, Rev. T. E. Ruth.
8.30 p.m.: From the Arcadia Theatre, Chats-
wooden, Organ Recital by Nicholas Robins.
9.30 p.m.: From the Studio, John Mitchell,
tenor.
9.37 p.m.: Kathleen Roe, pianiste.
9.44 p.m.: John Mitchell, tenor.
9.51 p.m.: Kathleen Roe, pianiste.
9.58 p.m.: Recital by chosen Information.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
10.50 a.m.: Morning Service broadcast from
Bourke Avenue Congregational Church.
Minister, Rev. Sydney Herbert Cox.
12.15 p.m.: Approx., From the Studio, “Solar”
information service.
12.30 p.m.: Studio music.
2 p.m.. G.P.O. clock and chimes; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnet.
Three p.m.: Studio music.
3.30 p.m.: From the Band Rotunda, Manly
Seaside, Manly Band, performed by J. Phe-
loung.
4.30 p.m.: Studio music.
5 p.m.. G.P.O. clock and chimes; shut down.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
6 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; Youngsters’s
Session, performed by Uncle Peter.
6.20 p.m.: Letters and tales
6.30 p.m.: Studio music.
7.15 p.m.: Night Service, broadcast from
Chalmers Candy Presbyterian Church.
Minister, Rev. D. F. Brandt
880 P-m.: From the Band Rotunda, Manly
Seaside, The Manly Municipal Army
Band, performed by J. Pheloung
9.30 p.m.: From the Studio, Alfred Crafty-
ham, baritone.
9.37 p.m.: Gerald Walenn, violinist.
9.44 p.m.: Alfred Cunningham, baritone.
9.51 p.m.: Gerald Walenn, violinist.
9.57 p.m.: Climate forecast.
10 p.m.. Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2UW
e x 1 P- m – : Shut down.
5.30 p.m.. Childrens Hour, performed by
Uncle Jack. 6.30 p.m.: Shut down. 7 p.m.:
Musical programme. 10 p.m.: Shut down.
2 GB
10 .15 a.m.: Organ music, from St. Alban’s
Church, Redfern, 10.30 a.m.: Morning
service. 12.Zero Midday: Shut down. 530
p.m.: Youngsters’s session. 7.Zero p.m.: Lec-
ture, from Adyar Corridor. 8.Zero p.m.: Sacred
live performance, from Adyar Corridor. 8.15 p.m •
Violin solos, by Mr. Cecil Berry. 8.25
, Songs, by Miss Elsie Brown. 832
p.m.: Flute solos, by Mr. Leslie Sproiile.
8.40 p.m.: Recital, by Mr. Heath Burdock.
8.50 p.m.: Cello solos, by Mr. Cedric Ash-
ton. 8.58 p.m.: Songs, by Miss Elsie
Brown. 9.5 p.m.: Violin solos, by Mr
Cecil Berry. 9.14 p.m.: Flute solos, by Mr’
Leslie Sproule. 9.21 p.m.: Recital, by Mr’
Heath Burdock. 9.31 p.m.: ’Cello solos, by
Mr. Cedric Ashton. 9.40 p.m.: Shut down

W. Furness Advert[edit]

W. FURNESS,
Ist Ground, Furness Chambers,
KING’S CROSS, DARLINGHURST.
Shields, Coils, and all Element Elements
as used within the Examined 1928 Solodyne.
Coils are assured to correct specifi-
cation.
Shields assembled if desired.
Phrases could also be organized.

O’Donnell, Griffin, & Co Advert[edit]

TRANSFORMERS.
Constructed as much as a specification and wound,
lamination iron reduce to any measurement from inventory
Costs and estimates on software.
O’DONNELL, GRIFFIN, & CO., LTD.,
53 Druitt Avenue, Sydney.
’Telephones: M 2991 (Three strains).

P.39 – Interstate Programmes, Solar., Jan. 13[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Solar., Jan. 13
3LO
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. 10.30 a.m.: Bells from
St. Paul’s Cathedral. 10.45 a.m.: Specific prepare in-
formation; British Official Wi-fi information from Rugby;
information from yesterday’s papers. 11 a.m.: Morning ser-
vice from Scots Church, Melbourne. Preacher: The
Rev Dr. W. Borland. Psalm: (Metrical Model),
84 v. 1-5, “How beautiful is Thy Dwelling Place.”
Prayer. Prose Psalms: 99 and 100, “The Lord Reign-
eth.” Outdated Testomony. Lesson: 2 Samuel, 24, v.
1-10. Hymn: No. 169, “O, For a Thousand Tongues.”
Prayer of Intercession. New Testomony. Lesson: St.
Matt. 20, v. 20-28. Anthem. The Lord’s Prayer.
The congregation standing will unite. Sermon: “The
Sin of Counting Heads,” 1 Chron. 21, v. 1 and seven.
Prayer, Intimations, Providing. Hymn: No. 91, “All
Hail the Energy of Jesus’ Identify.” 12.15 p.m.:, Shut
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. 2 p.m.: Sonora recital
of the world’s most well-known information. 3
p.m.: Nice Sunday afternoon, Wesley
Church Central Mission, Lonsdale Avenue, Melbourne.
Chairman, Rev. J. H. Cain. Hymn No. 113, ‘All
Folks That on Earth Do Dwell.” Prayer. Orches-
tral choice, Mr. G. M. Williams, conductor. Hymn
No. 52, “Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory.” Soloist:
Miss Dorothy Humphreys. Orchestra. Soloist: Miss
Dorothy Humphreys. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. 5.45 p.m.: Transport
data. 5.47 p.m.: Solutions to letters and birth-
day greetings by “Plain Peter.” 6.25 p.m.: Capt.
Donald Mac Lean will inform you “A Story of Lengthy In the past.
6.45 p.m.: Grownup birthday greetings and programme
bulletins. 6.47 p.m.: Bells from St. Pauls
Cathedral.
NIGHT SESSION
Accompaniste: Mabel Nelson. Announcer: C. J.
O’Connor. 7 p.m.: Night service from Central
Mission, Weslev Church, Lonsdale Avenue. Melbourne.
Performed by R6v. C. Irving Benson. Introit: The
Lord is in His Holy Temple.” Prayer: The Outer
Gate. Hymn: “Heavenly Father, Thou Hast Introduced
Us” Prayer: The Inside Courtroom. Anthem: Scripture
studying; intimations and choices. Anthem. Hymn,
“Our Blest Redeemer.” Sermon. Hymn: Now the Day
is Over.” 8.30 p.m.: Malvern Tramways Band: Se-
lection, “Gems from Gilbert and Sullivan’s Operas”
(Gilbert). 8.40: Myrtle Walsgott, contralto, “O Relaxation in
the Lord” (Mendelssohn). 8.47: Malvern Tramways
Band: March, “Australasian” (Rimmer). 8.52 p.m.:
Raymond Lambert, piano: Nocturne for Lefthand OnN
(Scriabine), “Scherzo in E Flat’ (De Bolk). 9.2
nm.’ Harold Browning, baritone, will give a recital
of son CT s by trendy British composers, with explana-
tory remarks. 9.15 p.m.: Malvern Tramways Band:
Waltz, “Fascination” (Rimmer). 9.20 p.m.: F.
Stempinski, violin—Symphonie Espagnole (Lalo),
Minuet in D (Mozart). 9.30 p.m.: Myrtle Wals-
gott, contralto: “I Carry My Coronary heart to Thee (Costa),
“Come Unto Me” (Koelmann). 9.37 p.m.: Malvern
Tramways Band: Choice, “Faust (Gounod). 9.50
p.m.: “Argus’* information session; bulletins. 10
p!m.: Shut down.
3AR
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 11.Zero a.m.: Morning
service from St. Paul’s Cathedral. Sentence. Ex-
hortation. Absolution. Lord’s Prayer. Versicles
and Responses. Venite. Psalms 46 and 47. First
Lesson. Te Deum. Second Lesson. Benedictus. The
Apostles’ Creed. Collects. Hymn 297 (A. and M.),
“Songs of Reward the Angels Sang.” The Litany.
Hymn 78, “The Heavenly Little one in Stature Grows.”
Sermon, Rev. T. H. Dewhurst. Hymn 193, “Jesu!
Lover of My Soul.” Benediction. 12.15 p.m.: Shut
down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p.m.: “Candy Solace from the Seraphina.”
4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
5.Zero p.m.: “Brer Rabbit.” A narrative for the child-
ren. 5.30 p.m.: Shut down.
NIGHT SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 7.Zero p.m.: A Bravura
of Stunning Ballads. A. S. Kenyon will converse on
“The Australian Aboriginals.” Extra Stunning Bal-
lads. 9.47 p.m.: Information Bulletins. 10.Zero p.m.:
God Save the King.
4QG
MORNING SESSION.
11.Zero p.m.: From the Baptist Metropolis Tabernacle, morn-
ing service. 12.15 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.15 p.m.: The live performance by the Residents’ Band (con-
ductor, Mr. A. Kaeser) will likely be relayed from the
Botanic Gardens. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
630 p.m.: Greetings from little listeners and re-
plies to letters.
NIGHT SESSION.
‘LO p.m.: From the Baptist Metropolis Tabernacle, chil-
dren’s service. 7.30 p.m.: Night service. On the
conclusion of the church service the live performance by the
Brisbane Municipal Live performance Band will likely be relayed
from Wickham Park. 9.30 p.m.: Shut down.
6WF
10.25 a.m.: Tune in. 10.30 a.m.: Particular half-
hour for the enthusiastic listener. 11 a.m.: Morning
service relayed from Trinity Church, St. George’s
Terrace, Perth. 12.15 p.m.: Shut down. 3.30 p.m.:
Tune in. 3.35 p.m.: Musical programme from the
studio, together with vocal and instrumental artists.
4.30 p.m.: Shut down. 7 p.m.: Tune in. 7.5 p.m.:
Youngsters’s bedtime tales. 7.30 p.m.: Night ser-
vice relayed from St. George’s Cathedral, Perth.
8.45 p.m.: Live performance by the Perth Metropolis Band, con-
ducted by Mr. L. M. Worth, and objects by vocal as-
sisting artists, relayed from Authorities Gardens,
Perth. 10.5 p.m.: Shut down. 104.5 metre trans-
mission: Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5 metres of
programme given on 1250 metres, commencing at 7
p.m.
7ZL
MORNING SESSION.
10.45 a.m.: Transmission from the Trinity Church,
Hobart, Trinity Bells. 11.Zero a.m.: Transmission from
Memorial Congregational Church, Hobart. Preacher,
Rev. Arthur C. Nelson. Topic: Scripture, John
21-1, 25. 12.30 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.30 p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 3.31
p.m.: Transmission from the Beaumaris Zoo, Hobart.
A band live performance by the Municipal Band (conductor
L. M. Barnett). 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.15 p.m.: Refrain singing. Conductor, Trevor M.
Morris, of Youngsters’s Particular Service Mission.) 6.45
p.m.: Bertha Southey Brammall will learn poems.
EVENING SESSION
7.Zero p.m.: Transmission from Chalmers Presby-
terian Church, Bathursst Avenue, Hobart. Preacher,
Rev. Crookston. 8.25 p.m.: A programme of sacred
and classical music organized by J. M. Counsel. 9.40
p.m.: Information session. 9.50 p.m.: Our Tasmanian good-
evening thought. God Save the King. Shut down.
c
n

Wi-fi Weekly Subscription Kind[edit]

DI3
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
To the Editor, “Wi-fi Weekly,” 51 Castlereagh Avenue, Sydney.
Please ahead “Wi-fi Weekly” for a interval of ■
for which I enclose f° r
(Add Alternate to Nation Cheques.)
NAME
ADDRESS ….
Subscription Charges: 12 months (52 points), 13/- publish free; 6 months (26
points), 6/6 publish free.

P.39 – W. G. Watson & Co[edit]

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P.40 – Native Programmes, Monday, January 14[edit]

Native Programmes, Monday, January 14
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
7.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
7.2 a.m.: Official climate forecast; rainfall;
river studies; temperatures; astronomical
memoranda. 7.7 a.m,; “Sydney Morning
Herald” abstract. 7.12 a.m.: Transport in-
telligence; mail companies. 7.15 a.m.: Studio
music. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market; min-
ing share markets; steel quotations; wool
gross sales; breadstuffs markets; inter-State mar-
kets; produce markets. 7.40 a.m.: Studio
music. 8.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben.” Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
10.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte replica. .10.10
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information ser-
vice. 10.25 a.m.; Studio music. 10.30 a.m.:
A chat by the 2FC Racing Commissioner.
10.45 a.m.: A chat on Residence Cooking and
Recipes, by Miss Ruth Furst. 11.Zero a.m.:
“Huge Ben”; A.P.A. and Reuter’s cable ser-
vices. 11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
12.Zero Midday: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
12.1 p.m.: Inventory Alternate, first name. 12.3
p.m.: Official climate forecast; rainfall.
12.5 p.m.: Studio music. 12.10 p.m.: Sum-
mary of stories, “Sydney Morning Herald.”
12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18 p.m.:
A studying. 12.30 p.m.: Studio music. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, Englamd v. Tasmania,
performed at Launceston. 12.47 p.m.: Studio
music. 1.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben”; climate intel-
ligence. 1.Three p.m.: “Night Information” noon
information service; Producers’ Distributing So-
ciety’s report. 1.20 p.m.: Studio music.
1.28 p.m.: Inventory Alternate, second name. 1.30
p.m.: Common studio music. 1.57 p.m.: Cric-
ket scores. 2.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32 p.m.: Report recital of world-famous
artists. 2.45 p.m.: Speak, by Miss B. Macau-
lay, in continuation of her collection, “Your Son.”
3.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Pianoforte replica.
3.15 p.m.: Common music. 3.30 p.m.: Daybreak
Harding, mezzo—(a) “An Epitaph” (Besly);
(b) “Grasp Carol” (Shaw). 3.37 p.m.: Sim
Solomon, violinist—(a) “La Capriciluse”
(Elgar); (b) “Melody” (Dawes). 3.44 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania. 3.45
p.m.: A studying. 4.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” From
the Lyceum, the Lyceum Orchestra, beneath
the conductorship of Frank M‘Cann. 4.10
p.m.: From the Studio—Daybreak Harding,
mezzo, (a) “Demise and the Maiden” (Schu-
bert); (b) “Impatience” (Schubert). 4.17
p.m.: Sim Solomon, violinist—(a) “Menuet”
(Beethoven); (b) “Gipsy Airs” (Sarasate).
4.24 p.m.: Common music. 4.30 p.m.: From
the Lyceum—The Lyceum Orchestra, beneath
the conductorship of Frank M‘Cann. 4.44
p.m.: From the Studio—Third name of the
Inventory Alternate. 4.47 p.m.: Common music
5.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC. 5.45 p.m.:
The kids’s session, performed by the
“Good day Man,” and assisted by Miss Dorothy
Vautier; letters and tales; music and en-
tertainment. 6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market
studies (wool, wheat, and inventory). 6.40 p.m.:
Fruit and vegetable markets. 6.43 p.m.:
Inventory Alternate data. 6.45 p.m.:
Climate and transport information. 6.48 p.m.:
Rugby wi-fi information. 6.50 p.m.: Late sport-
ing information. 7.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben”; late information
service. 7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quar-
tette, performed by Mr. Horace Keats—(a)
“Peacock Alley” (Hay); (b) “Chiquita”
(Wayne); (c) “A Track Remembered”
(Coates); (d) “Rosemarie” (Friml); (e)
“Roses of Ispaham” (Van Phillips).
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
Accor anist: Ewart Chappie.
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte replica.
7.52 p.m.: Cricket outcomes, Tasmania v. Eng-
land, performed at Launceston.
7.54 p.m.: Common music.
8.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” From the Haymarket
Theatre, the Haymarket Theatre Orches-
tra, beneath the baton of Sydney Porter.
8.20 p.m.: From the Studio —The Ashfield
Choral and Musical Society.
8 30 p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instrumen-
tal, “La Fille Du Tamboir Main” (Offen-
bach) .
8.40 p.m.: Gwladys Evans, soprano—
(a) “II Pastore Canta” (Rech).
(b) “She Wandered Down the Mountain
Aspect” (Clay).
8.47 p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instrumen-
talists —
“Suite Romanesque” (Besly).
Sunday morning.
8.57 p.m.: A. G. McDonald, baritone-
la) “Thank Me Not” (Mallinson).
(b) “Sing, Break Into Track” (Mallinson).
9.Four p.m.: Climate report.
9.5 p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instru-
mentalists — .
(a) “Over the Steppe” (Gretchamnoff).
(b) “Track of the E book” (Lack).
(c) “Scherzo” (Centola).
9.15 p.m.: The Ashfield Choral and Musical
Society. ,
9 25 p.m.: From the Haymarket Theatre—
‘The Haymarket Theatre Orchestra, beneath
the baton of Stanley Porter.
9.45 p.m.: From the Studio: Gwladys Evans,
soprano—
(a) “Need” (Goldberg).
(b) “Cupid” (Goldberg).
9.52 p.m.: A. G. MacDonald, baritone—
(a) “Fill a Glass With Golden Wine
(Quilter). . „ … s
(b) “O, Mistress Mine (Quilter).
10.Zero p.m.: The Mild Music 4, instru-
mentalists —
(a) “On the Inn” (Massenet).
(b) “Comfort, No. 3” (Liszt).
10.15 p.m.: The Ashfield Choral and Musical
Society.
10 27 p.m.: To-morrows programme.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthepi. Shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metropo-
litan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State climate
report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music. 8.15 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; information service from
the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25 a.m.:
Studio music. 8.50 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; Studio music. 8.35 a.m.: Informa-
tion, malis, transport, arrivals, departures,
and sailings. 8,38 a.m:: Information from the
“Every day Telegraph Pictorial” 8.45 a.m.:
GP.O. chimes; Studio music. 9 a.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes; Studio music. 9.30 a.m.:
Half an hour with silent mates. 10 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation Session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m,: Girls’s ses-
sion, performed by Mrs. Cranfield. 12 midday:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular ocean fore-
solid and climate report. 12.Three p.m.: Studio
music. 12.30 p.m.: Transport and mails.
12.35 p.m.: Market studies. 12.45 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania, performed
at Launceston. 12.48 p.m.: “Solar” noon
information service. 1 p.m.: Studio music. 1.35
p.m.: Speak to kids and particular entertain-
ment for youngsters in hospital. 1.57 p.m.:
Cricket scores. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; cricket
scores, England v. Tasmania. 3.46 p.m.:
Pianoforte replica. Four p.m.: Romano’s
Dance Orchestra, performed by Bennie Abra-
hams. 4.10 p.m.: Jeanne Byndon, contralto,
from the Studio, (a) “Sand Castles” (Leoni),
(b) “I Know a Financial institution” (Martin Shaw), (c)
“Oasis” (Hewitt). 4.17 p.m.: Edward Evans,
baritone. 4.20 p.m.: Captain FrecL Aarons,
thriller story, “The Home Slide”; cricket
scores, England v. Tasmania. 4.35 p.m.:
Common music. 4.40 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, performed by Bennie Abrahams.
4.50 p.m.: Promenade the Studio, Jeanne Byndon,
(a d,.“° n l y ° ne England” (Smith),
i*?) . The Blind Ploughman” (Coningsby
Clarke). 4.57 p.m.: Edward Evans, bari-
tone. 5.Four p.m.: “Solar” information service. 5.10
p.m.: Pianoforte replica. 5.20 p.m.:
Common music. 5.37 p.m.: Options of the
night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Al £ n ?n ncers: J ’ Kni £ ht Barnett, Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s session; music and
leisure. 6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet (a) “Rusti-
canella (Cortopassi), (b) “Was it a Dream”
(Coslow) (c) “Excessive Jinks” (Friml), (d)
Saskatchewan” (Gilbert), (e) “O Star of
Eve” (f) “ A Kiss earlier than the
Daybreak (Perkins). 7.10 p.m.: Cricket scores,
England v. Tasmania. 7.12 p.m.: Australian
Mercantile Land and Finance Co.’s report-
climate report and forecast by courtesy of
Govt Meteorologist; Producers’ Distributing
Societys fruit and vegetable market report;
gram and fodder report (“Solar”); dairy pro-
duce report (“Solar”). 7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pim
and Miss Pam in promoting talks and non-
sense. 7.55 p.m.: Programme and different an-
nouncements.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; The Sa-
voyans’ Dance Band.
8.15 p.m.: Poppy Plant and Peg. Web page, popu-
lar vocal duets.
8.25 p.m.: Charles Lawrence, entertainer.
8.35 p.m.: Edward Gregory, saxophonist.
A Debate performed by the
Y.M.C.A. Debating Group. Affirmative,
Messrs. R. Kidson, A. Simpson, and George
Snow. Damaging: Messrs. R. Chappie L
Starke, and D. M’Leod.
9.22 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band
9.32 p.m.: Poppy Plant and Peg. Web page, popu-
lar vocal duets.
ture, whereby listeners are taken from
9.42 p.m.: “Sydney By Night time”—a novel fea-
place to put, following a vivid description
by our announcer who’s travelling Sydnev
streets in a automotive fitted with a transmitting
set, describing the varied factors of in-
terest.
9.52 p.m.: From the Studio, Charles Regulation-
rence, entertainer.
10.2 p.m.: Edward Gregory, saxophonist.
10.9 p.m.: “Sydney by Night time.” ;
ban Kand 0 ” ““ £StUdi °’ The Savo **” s ‘
10.30 p.m.: Late climate report and forecast.
10.32 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band.
10.57 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme. J
11 p.m.: The Savoyans’ Dance Band. Dur-
mg intervals between dance objects “Solar”
information will likely be given.
11 -30 p..m: Nationwide Anthem.
2GB
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: HaDDiness speak
by A ‘ E- -Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music. 10 30
a.m.: Womens session, by Miss Helen J.
Beeghng. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.0
p.m.. Music. 2.5 p.m.: Girls’s radio ser-
vice, by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan; Pat Han-
sen, sports activities speak. 2.50 p.m.: Music. 3.0
p.m.: Speak. 3.15 p.m.: ciose down. 5. 30
p.m.. Youngsters s session, by Uncle George
7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market studies, bv
New Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Company
Ltd. 7.15 p.m.: Music. 8.Zero p.m.: Songs!
by Miss Lorraine Lincey. 8.10 p.m.: Gadgets
by tne. Newtown Band; conductor, Mr. c.
Bignall. 8.30 p.m.: A humorous interlude
by Mr Jack Win and Mr. Heath Burdock’
8.40 p.m.: Songs, by Mr. Leslie Herford’
8.50 p.m.: Pianoforte solo, by Miss Ada
Brook. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate report; deal with.
9.15 p.m.: Songs, by Miss Lorraine Lincey
9.25 p.m.: Gadgets by the Newtown Band.
9.55 p.m.: A humorous interlude. 10 0
p.m.: Songs, by Mr. Leslie Herford. 10.io
p.m.: Orchestral music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut
down.

P.41 – Clyde Batteries Advert[edit]

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To nation residents—Have you ever
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Clyde Battery Service Station, 106-
110 Goulburn Avenue, Sydney. You
will obtain in return a duplicate of an
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Clyde Batteries for radio, automobiles and home-lighting are made by the Clyde Engineering
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Obtainable in any respect radio sellers and garages all through the Commonwealth.
C. 52.

P.42 – Interstate Programmes, Monday, January 14[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Monday, January 14
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
7.5 a.m.: Specific prepare data. 7.15 a.m.:
Morning melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workouts to
music. 7.30 a.m.:’ Inventory studies. Market studies.
Basic information. Transport. Sporting data. 8.0
a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time sign. 8.1 a.m.;
Morning melodies. 8.15 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer:’ Frank Hatherley. ll’.O a.m.: 3LO’s
totally different dainties for the every day dinner. To-day’s
radio recipe. 11.5 a.m.: Miss Olga Parker. Tales
to inform the youngsters. What some well-known poets have
written for youngsters—Browning. 11.20 a.m.: Musical
interlude. 11.25 a.m.: Below the auspices of the
Employees’ Academic Affiliation, Mr. G. F. Brown
will converse on “An Journey in Grownup Schooling.”
11.40 a.m.: Musical interlude. 11.45 a.m.: Below
the auspices of the Security Council of Victoria, Mr.
H. J. E book will converse on “Some Elements of Security.”
MIDDAY NEWS SESSION.
12.Zero midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign. Ex-
press prepare data. 12.1 p.m.: British official
wi-fi information from Rugby. Reuter’s and the Aus-
tralian Press Affiliation cables. “Argus” information ser-
vice. 12.15 p.m.: Newmarket inventory gross sales. Particular re-
port by John M’Namara and Co. 12.20 p.m.: Com-
munity singing, transmitted from the Auditorium,
Collins Avenue. Conductor, G. J. MacKay. Moran
Hilford (basso) (by permission J. C. Wililamson,
Ltd.). “The Garonne.” “The Captain’s Ditty.”
Chosen. 1.45 p.m.” Inventory Alternate data.
Meteorological data. Climate forecast for
Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania, and South
Australia. Ocean forecasts. River studies. Rain-
fall. 1.55 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. Accompaniste:
Agnes Fortune. 2.15 p.m.: The Strad Trio. “Trio
in C Minor” (Lavater). Variazoni-Allegretto Scher r
zando. Andante-Allegro Moderato. 2.30 p.m.: Ber-
nard Manning (bass-baritone) (by permission J. C.
Williamson, Ltd.). “When the King Went Forth
to Battle.” “The Three Roads” (Kolhman). 2.37 p.m.:
Frank Johnstone (’cello). “Hungarian Rhapsodv”
(Popper). 2.44 p.m.; Cecil Parkes and Could Brode-
rick (violin and piano). “Sonata E Flat, No. 5”
(Mozart). Allegro. Rondo. 2.53 p.m.: Violet
Jackson (soprano). “Moonlight” (Schumann).
“Cradle Track” (Schubert). 3.Zero p.m.: The Strad
Trio. “Cannon” (Lavater). “Styrienne” (Lavater).
“Menuet in E Flat” (Beethoven). “Scherzo” (Reis-
signer). 3.12 p.m.: Captain Donald MacLean will
proceed his collection of “Pirate” tales. 3.30 p.m.:
The station orchestra. Overture, “Merry Wives of
Windsor” (Nicolai). 3.40 p.m.: Bernard Manning
(bass-baritone)-. “Simon the Cellarer” (Hatton).
“King Charles” (White). 3.47 p.m.: The station
orchestra. Suite, “Le Deaux Pigeons” (Messager),
3.55 p.m.: Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a
quick recital. 4.2 p.m.: Percy Code (trumpet). “For
You Alone” (Geehl). 4.7 p.m.: The station or-
chestra. Choice, “The Pupil Prince” (Rom-
berg). 4.17 p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano). “Straw-
berries” (Oliver). “Early One Morning” (previous Eng-
lish). 4.25 p.m.: The station orchestra. Choice.
“Romeo and Juliet” (Gounod). 4.35 p.m.: Keith
Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief recital.
4.42 p.m.: Joseph Barrille (flute). “Belle Espag-
nola” (Tobani). 4.47 p.m.: The station orchestra.
“Andante from Symphony in G” (Mozart). Suite.
“In Arcady” (Nevin). 5.Zero p.m.: “Herald” information
service. Inventory Alternate data. Progress
scores within the Cricket match, England v. Tasmania,
at Launceston, will likely be broadcast as they arrive to
hand; additionally N.S.W. v. South Australia, at Ade-
laide. 5.10 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions
to letters and birthday greetings by “Bobby Blue-
gum.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m.:
Captain Donald MacLean will inform you extra thrill-
ing “Pirate” adventures. 6.45 p.m.: “Bobby Blue-
gum,” songs and tales.
NIGHT SESSION.
Announcer: C.. J. O’Connor, Accompaniste: Agnes
Fortune. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data.
7.15 p.m.: Market studies. 7.30 p.m.: Information ses-
sion. Stumps scores, cricket match, England v.
Tasmania, at Launceston, will likely be broadcast as they
come handy; additionally N.S.W. v. South Australia, at
Adelaide. 7.43 p.m.: Birthday greetings. 7.45 p.m.:
Out of the Previous. 7.46 p.m.: Below the auspices of
the Division of Agriculture, Mr. W. C. Rugg,
poultry inspector, will converse on “Poultry Maintaining:
Seasonable Hints.” 8.Zero p.m.: A Maker of His-
tory. 8.1 p.m.: Transmission from the Tivoli
Theatre (by permission Tivoli Theatres, Ltd.). Ern-
est Oram and his Tivoli orchestra. 9.15 p.m,: Professional-
fessor R. J. A. Berry, “Chicago, the Metropolis of Tremendous-
latives.” 9.30 p.m.: The station orchestra. “Rural
Scenes and Dances” (Albert Matt). 9.37 p.m.:
Olive Painter (mezzo-soprano). “La Serenata”
(Tosti). “Dennis” (Richardson). 9.44 p.m.: The
station orchestra. Suite of dances, “My Native
Heath” (Wooden). 9.54 p.m.: Olive Painter (mezzo-
soprano). “My Laddie.” “Fairings” (Easthope-
Martin). 10,1 p.m.: Myrtle Robertson (violinist).
“Romance” (Svendsen). 1.Eight p.m.: The station
orchestra. Suite, “Harvest Time” (Haydn Wooden).
1018 p.m.: “Argus” information session. Eric Welch’s
choices for the Warrnambool Races, Tuesday,
15th. 10.28 p.m.: Bernard Manning (bass-baritone)
(bv permission J. C. Williamson, Ltd.). 10.35 p.m.:
Keith Desmond (elocutionist) will give a brief re-
cital. 10.42 p.m.: The station orchestra. “The
Voice of the Bells” (Thurban). 10.47 p.m.: Ber-
nard Manning (bass-baritone). “Until I Wake” (Fin-
den). “The Temple Bells” (Finden). 10.54 p.m.:
Our Nice Thought for to-day is: “It’s straightforward to
be philosophical over different individuals’s troubles.” —
(Trendy proverb.) 10.55 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
“Sally Rose” (Good friend). “Sincerely I Do” (Davis).
“The Prune Track” (Crumit). “Sleepy Child”
(Kahn). “Get Out and Get Below the Moon”
(Tobias). “That’s My Weak spot Now” (Stept).
“Tiger Rag” (Moore). “Dream Home” (Fox).
“Jeannine” (Gilbert). “Day Goals” (Hallam).
“Mississippi Mud” (Harris). “Ups and Downs”
(Rose). “Good-night Waltz” (Bibo). “Good-night
Refrain. 11.40 p.m.: God Save the King.
3AR
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 10.Zero a.m.:
G.P.O. clock says “Ten.” 10.1 a.m.:
“Age” Inventory Alternate studies; London steel mar-
ket. 10.10 a.m.: “Age” market studies; farm and
station produce; fruit, fish, greens, and many others. 10.2j>
a.m.: “Age” transport studies; ocean forecast. 10-30
a.m.: Mail notices; specific prepare data. 10.35
a,m.: “Age” information service, unique to 3AR. 10.59
a.m.: Climate forecast.
MORNING MUSICAL SESSION.
11.Zero a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Chiquita
(Wayne), “Dream Home” (Fox), “Jeannine” (Gil-
berts), “Bought an enormous date with somewhat lady” (Tobias),
“Sunshine” (Berlin), “A Stolen Melody” (Fisher).
11.20 a.m,: Vocal variations. 11.26 a.m.: Ned Tyr-
rell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Please inform me” (Miller),
“Adoree” (Silver). “You’re in love, I’m in love
(Donaldson), “By no means earlier than, by no means once more” (Chxk),
“Snicker, clown, snort” (Younger). 11.48 a.m.: Vocal
variations. 11.52 a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
“Sticky Paws” (Andrina), “Why haven’t we acquired the
Sunday daily” (Summers), “Cherished Me’ (Wil-
son), “What a child” (Whiting), “What’s my weak-
ness now” (Stept). 12.12 p.m.: Vocal variations.
12.18 p.m.: British official wi-fi information; announce-
ments. 12.28: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Get out
and get beneath the moon” (Tobias), Any person s
loopy about you” (Murphy), “What a child’ (Whit-
ing), “What do I care what anyone stated” (Woods),
extra” (Burnett). 12.48 p.m.: Vocal varia-
tions. 12.56: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Nebraska”
(Sissilli), “Angelia Mia” (Rappee), “Kiss earlier than the
daybreak” (Perkins). “Parting with you” (Conley),
“Chloe” (Kahn). 1.6 p.m.: Vocal variations. 1-12
p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces— “Lonely in a crowd’
(Greer), “Louisiana” (Schaefer), “My blackbirds are
bluebirds now” (Good friend), “Guess who’s on the town
(Razay), “As a result of my child don’t imply possibly now
(Donaldson). 1.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley, 6.Zero p.m.: Candy sol-
ace on tile Seraphina. 7.50 p.m.: Outcomes of cricket,
England v. Tasmania; South Australia v. New South
Wales, at Adelaide.
NIGHT SESSION
8.Zero p.m.: H. V. Brooke. Vice-Commodore of the
St. Hilda Dinghy Membership, will converse on “The Australian
14ft. Dinghy Championship, to be held in Melbqurne
on the 24th, 26th. and 28th January.” 8.15 p.m.:
Tristan N. N. Buest will converse beneath the auspices
of the League of Nations’ Union. 8.30 p.m.: H.
Webb, Supervisor of the Tasmanian Authorities Tour-
ist Bureau, will converse on “An Outdated Tasmanian
Worthy.” 8.40 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—
“Chiquita” (Wayne), “Final Night time I dreamed you
kissed me” (Kahn), “Tin Pan Parade” (Gillespie).
8.50 p.m.: Violet Jackson, soprano—“My Coronary heart is
unhappy for anyone,” “Canterbury Bells” (Carew),
8.57 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Who is aware of?”
(Dixon), “Ah, candy thriller of Life” (Herbert),
“Night Star” (Turk). 9.7 p.m.: Jean Lewis, con-
tralto—“Ae Fond Kiss” (Outdated Highland Melody),
“Banks “of Allen Water.” 9.14 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces, “Down Residence” —Rag (Sweetman),
“We’ll have a brand new dwelling within the morning” (Buck),
“In a Bamboo Backyard” (Donaldson). 9.24 p.m.:
Robert Allen, alto—“Within the Backyard of To-morrow”
(Deppen). “Pondering of Thee” (Caro Roma). 9.31
p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces—“Something you
say” (Donaldson), “That Melody of Love” (Don-
aldson), “Constantinople” (Carlton). 9.41 p.m.:
Violet Jackson, soprano—“Hatfield Bells” (E. Mar-
tin), “Pack and Penny Days,” from “Songs of the
Honest” (E. Martini. 9.48 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-
o-Aces —“Dont’ Cry, Child” (Kahn), “Hum and
Strum” (Meyers). “Jazz Grasp —Piano Solo” (Could-
erel). 9.58 p.m.: Jean Lewis, contralto—“I be
Hopin’” (C. Clarke), “My Woman and I” (C. Clarke).
10.5 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces —“In my bou-
quet of Reminiscences” (Lewis), “Sentimental Child”
(Davis), “Rose of Monterey*’ (Man). 10.15 p.m.:
Robert Allen, alto. “Over the Waters Blue” (Clarke),
“Throb of the Passionate Day” (Lohr), 10.22 p.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Pink Head” (Ermbey),
“Jeannine” (Gilbert), “Dream Home” (Fox). 10.30
p.m.: “Age” information service, unique to 3AR; re-
sults of cricket, England v. Tasmania; South Aus-
tralia v. New South Wales, at Adelaide; God Save
the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
7.43 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information service.
8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical information. 8.15 a.m.: Information ser-
vice. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
110 a.m.: Music. 11.5 a.m.: Social information. 11.15
a.m.: “To Melbourne and Again,” half
3, by “Traveller.” 11.30 a.m.: Music. 11.35 a.m-:
Extra social information. 11.45 a.m.: Wurliter organ. 12.0
p.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
1.Zero p.m.: Market studies and climate data.
1.20 p.m.: Lunch-hour music. 2.Zero p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p m.: Orchestral music by the Tivoli Operatic
Orchestra, beneath the baton of Mr. C. Groves. 3.30
p.m.: Mail prepare .operating instances. A programme of
electrically-reproduced information. 4.Zero p.m.: Orchestral
music. 4.15 p.m.: This afternoon’s information. 4.30 p.m,:
Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; mail informa-
tion; transport information. 6 5 t>.rr> ‘ Electrically-reproduced
information. 6.25 p.m.; Industrial bulletins. 6.30
p.m.: Bedtime tales, performed by “The Sandman.”
7.Zero p.m.: Information briefly. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate
r.ews. “7,6 p.m.: Metallic quotations. 7.7 p.m.: Market
studies. 7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30
p.m.: Climate data. 7.40 p.m.: Announce-
ments. 7.43 p.m.: Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.:
Lecturette, ‘‘The Youngsters’s Music Nook,” con-
ducted by “The Music Man.”
NIGHT SESSION.
8.Zero p.m.: The Studio Orchestra, choice, “The
Shamrock,” half 1 (Myddleton). 8.9 p.m.: C. R.
Kolb (tenor), “Oft within the Stilly Night time.” 8.13 p.m.:
The Anglo Male Quartette, “The Minstrel Boy”
(Moore). 8.18 p.m.: Phyllis Verner (soprano), “Be-
lieve Me if All” (Moore), “Come Again to Erin”
(Claribel). 8.25 p.m.: The Studio Orchestra, two-
step, “Come Out of the Kitchen, Mary Ann” (Ken-
dis). 8.30 p.m.: A. F. Stoddart (baritone), “The
Mour tains o’ Mourne” (French and Collison). 8.35
p.m.: R. Pike (bass) and C. Kolb (tenor), vocal duet.
“Excelsior.” 8.40 p.m.: Ella Howie (contralto),
‘Kathleen Mavourneen” (Crouch), “Killarney.” 8.47
p.m.: Tom Muller (elocutionist), chosen. 8.50 p.m.:
Pat M’Onigly (soprano), “A Little Little bit of Heaven.”
9.Zero p.m.: Metropolitan climate forecast. 9.1 p.m,:
The Studio Orchestra, choice, “The Shamrock,”
half 2 (Myddleton). 9.11 p.m.: Dick Pike (bass),
“Father O’Flynn,” “Off to Philadelphia.” 9.19 p.m.:
Ttie Studio Orchestra, intermezzo, “Blarney Kisses”
(Travis). 9,24 p.m.: Ella Howie (contralto), “The
Rosary” (Nevin). 9.29 p.m.: Tom Muller (elocution-
ists chosen. 9.33 p.m.: The Anglo Male Quartette.
“Pricey Little Shamrock,” 9.36 p.m.: Pat M’Onigly
isoprano), “Barney O’Hea.” 9.40 p.m.: The Studio
Orchestra, dance medley, “Echoes of Eire” (arr.
Lange). 9.46 p.m.: The Anglo Male Quartette, “The
Residence Highway.” 9.50 p.m.: The Studio Orchestra, one-
step, ‘Someplace in Erin” (Temple); Celtic oddity,
“Tipperary Twinkle” (Bendix). 10.Zero p.m.: The “Every day
Mail ’ information, the “Courier” information, climate information. Shut
down.
6WF
12.30 p.m.: Tune in. 12.35 p.m.: Markets, information,
and cables. 1 p.m.: Time sign. 1.1 p.m.: Climate
notes equipped by the Meteorological Bureau of West
Australia; station bulletins. 1.2 p.m.:
Brunswick Panatrope hour, relayed from
Messrs. Musgrove’s, Ltd., Live performance Corridor,
Perth. 2 p.m.: Shut down. 3.30 p.m.: Tune in.
3.35 p.m.: Afternoon tea live performance relayed from the
Carlton Cafe, Perth; vocal and instrumental inter-
ludes from the studio. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down. 6.45
P- m y Tune in. 6.48 p.m.: Tales for the kiddies by
Uncles Henry and Duffy; Uncle Henry will speak to
the boys. 7.5 p.m.: Gadgets by the Studio Trio. 7.30
p.m.: Shares, markets, information. 7.45 p.m.: Speak by
Lieut.-Col. Le Souef, Director of the Zoological Gar-
dens. South Perth. Eight p.m.: Time sign. 8.1 p.m.:
Climate notes equipped by the Meteorological Bureau
of West Australia; station bulletins, similar to
additions to programmes, and many others. 8.Three p.m.: Musical
programme from the studio, together with vocal and in-
strumental, artists. 9 p.m.: Late information; ships inside
vary announcement; climate report and forecast-
station bulletins. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down
104.5-metre transmision: Simultaneous broadcast on
104.5 metres of programme given on 1250 metres,
commencing at 6.45 p.m. y 4
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSION
11.30 a.m.: Particular January wool gross sales. Trans-
mission from the City Corridor, Hobart. 11.45 a.m.:
His Grasp’s Voice. 11.55 a.m.: Tasmanian station’s
9 a.m. climate report. Ships inside wi-fi vary.
12.Zero midday: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 12.1 p.m.-
Transport data. Mail notices. Housewives’
information. 12.Eight p.m.: Transmission from the City Corridor,
Hobart. Particular wool gross sales. 12.33 p.m.: His Mas-
ter’s Voice. 12.55 p.m.: Transmission from the
City Corridor, Hobart. 1.Zero p.m.: “Mercury” information ser-
vice. From the studio. 1.10 p.m.: His Grasp’s
Voice. 1.30 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.:
His Grasp’s Voice. 3.Four p.m.: Particular Midlands
climate forecast. 3.5 p.m.: His Grasp’s Voice. 4.15
p.m.: “Aunt Edna” will converse on “Equipment for
Summer season Put on.” 4.30 p.m.: Shut down. Throughout
the afternoon progress outcomes will likely be given of the
cricket match, English XI. v. Tasmania, at Laun-
ceston.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.10 p.m.: Outcomes of cricket match, English XI.
v. Tasmania, at Launceston. 6.15 p.m.:
His Grasp’s Voice. < 6.45 p.m.: Little Sheila Carroll will recite to the youngsters, “Polly Dibbs,” “The King’s Breakfast.” 7.Zero p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday greetings by “Uncle David.” 7.5 p.m.: His Grasp’s Voice. 7.15 p.m.: Information ses- sion. EVENING SESSION. 7.30 p.m.: Geo. Collis, Tasmania’s champion wrest- ler, will converse on, “Does Smoking Have an effect on Well being,” beneath the auspices of the 7ZL Study-to-swim Week. 7.45 p.m.: J. Sharpe will converse on, “How one can study to swim in an hour.” 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 8.6 p.m.: Ted M'Cann and his orchestra. 9.45 p.m.: Information session. 10.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 10.2 p.m.: God Save the King. Shut down. i

P.43 – Mullard Advert[edit]

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.

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iiif: : i.
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P.44 – Native Programmes, Tuesday, January 15[edit]

Native Programmes, Tuesday, January 15
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
7 am.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins. 7.2
a.m.: Official climate forecast, rainfall,
river studies, temperatures, astronomical
memoranda. 7.7 a.m.: “Sydney Morning
Herald” abstract. 7.12 a.m.: Transport in-
telligence, mail companies. 7.15 a.m.: Studio
music. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market, min-
ing share markets, steel quotations, wool
gross sales, breadstuffs markets, inter-State mar-
kets, produce markets. 7.40 a.m.: Studio mu-
sic. Eight a.m.: “Huge Ben;” shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
10 a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte replica. 10.10
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information ser-
vice. 10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m.:
Final minute sporting data by the 2FC
Racing Commissioner. 10.40 a.m.: Studio mu-
sic. 10.50 a.m.: Pianoforte replica. 11
a.m.: “Huge Ben.” A.P.A. and Reuter’s Cable
Providers. 11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
Be aware: Race outcomes will likely be given. 12 midday:
“Huge Ben” and bulletins. 12.1 n.m.:
Inventory trade first name. 12.Three p.m.: Official
climate forecast, rainfall. 12.5 p.m.: Studio
music. 12.10 p.m.: Abstract of stories, “Syd-
ney Morning Herald.” 12.15 p.m.: Rugby
wi-fi information. 12.18 p.m.: A studying. 12.30
p.m.: Studio music. 12.45 p.m.: Cricket
scores, England v. Tasmania, performed at
Launceston. 12.47 p.m.: Studio music. 1 p.m.:
“Huge Ben,” climate intelligence. 1.Three p.m.:
“Evenink Information” noon information service; Professional-
ducers’ Distributing Society’s report. 1.20
p.m.: Studio music. 1.28 p.m.: Inventory Ex-
change, second name. 1.30 p.m.: Studio mu-
sic. 1.57 p.m: Cricket scores 2 p.m.: “Huge
Ben”; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins. 2.32
p.m.: Academic Session for the Colleges —
quick musical programme; speak. Three p.m.: “Huge
Ben,” pianoforte replica. 3.15 p.m.:
Common music. 3.24 p.m.: Bessie Magner,
contralto —(a) “Danny Boy” (Weatherley),
(b) “Salaam” (Lang). 3.30 p.m.: Eric Cox
boy soprano. 3-37 p.m.: William Krasnik.
violinist —(a) “Track of Desert” (Walenn), (b)
“Impromptu in G” (Schubert-Monk). 3.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania
3.46 p.m.: A studying. Four p.m.: “Huge Ben”;
Bessie Magner, contralto —(a) “The Night time
has a Thousand Eyes” (Metcalf), (b) “A
Track Remembered” (Coates). 4.7 p.m.: Eric
Cox, boy soprano. 4.14 p.m. From the Went-
price —The Wentworth Cafe Dance Orches-
tra, beneath the path of Jimmy Elkins
4.24 p.m.: From the Studio, William Krasnik,
violinist —(a) “Dance ’al ’Ombrella” (As-
prey), (b) “Lament” (Schubert-Monk). 4.31
p.m.: Cricket scores. 4.32 p.m.: Common mu-
sic. 4.45 p.m.: Inventory Alternate, third name.
4.47 p.m.: Common music. 5 p.m.: “Huge Ben’;
shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
5.40 p.m.: The chimes of 2FC. 5.45 p.m.:
The Youngsters’s Session, performed by the
“Good day Man,” assisted by “Aunt Eily.” Let-
ters and tales. Music and leisure.
6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market studies (wool,
wheat, inventory). 6.40 p.m.: Fruit and vegetable
markets. 6.43 p.m.: Inventory Alternate infor-
mation. 6.45 p.m.: Climate and transport
information. 6.48 p.m.: Rugby Wi-fi information. 6.50
p.m.: Late sporting information. 7 p.m.: “Huge Ben”;
late information service. 7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Din-
ner Quartette, performed by Horace Keats.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Laurence Halbert.
Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.
7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte replica.
7.52 p.m.: Cricket outcomes, England v. Tas-
mania, performed at Launceston.
8.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben”; the Metropolitan Band,
from Darlington City Corridor.
8.20 p.m.: Gwladys Fimister, soprano.
8.27 p.m.: A sketch by Scott Alexander.
8.37 p.m.: Hilda Sutton, violinist.
8.45 p.m.: “The Mellow Fellows,” in track and
story.
8.55 p.m.: The Metropolitan Band, from the
Darlington City Corridor.
9.5 p.m.: From the Studio: Climate forecast.
9.6 p.m.: Gwladys Fimister, soprano.
9.13 p.m.: A sketch by Scott Alexander.
9.23 p.m.: Hilda Sutton, violinist.
9.30 p.m.: “The Mellow Fellows,” in track and
story.
9.40 p.m.: The Metropolitan Band, from the
Darlington City Corridor.
10 p.m.: From the Studio: “The Mellow Fel-
lows,” in track and story.
10.10 p.m.: The Studio Dance Band, conduct-
ed by Cec. Morrison.
10 20 p.m.: Dorothy Dewar, in standard num-
bers.
10.27 p.m.: The Studio Dance Band, conduct-
ed by Cec. Morrison.
10.37 p.m.: Late climate.
10.38 p.m.: The Studio Dance Band, conduct-
ed by Cec. Morrison.
10.57 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme
10.58 p.m.: The Studio Bance Band, conduct-
ed by Cec. Morrison.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metro-
politan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State
climate report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music.
8.15 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; information
from the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25
a.m.: Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes; Studio music. 8.35 a.m.: In-
formation, mails, transport, arrivals, depar-
tures, and sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information from
the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.45 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; Studio music. 9
a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; Studio music.
9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with silent mates.
10 a.m.: G.P.O clock and chimes; shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Be aware. —Race outcomes.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation Session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Girls’s ses-
sion, performed by Mrs. Cranfield. 12 midday:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular ocean fore-
solid and climate report. 12.Three p.m.: Piano-
forte replica. 12.30 p.m.: Transport
and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market studies. 12.45
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania,
performed at Launceston. 12.48 p.m.: “Solar”
noon information service. 1 p.m.: Studio music.
1.35 p.m.: Speak to kids and particular en-
tertainment for youngsters in hospital. 1.57
p.m.: Cricket scores. 2 p.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe. >
3.45 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes.; cricket scores,
England v. Tasmania. 3.46 p.m.: Pianoforte
replica; Four p.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; Romano’s Dance Band, performed
by Bennie Abrahams. 4.10 p.m.: From the
Studio, J. Knight Barnett, entertainer. 4.17
p.m.: “Solar” information service. 4.20 p.m.: Ro-
mano’s Dance Orchestra, performed by Ben-
nie Abrahams. 4.30 p.m.: From the Studio;
cricket scores; Kathleen Nichols, soprano,
(a) “April Morn” (Badden), (b) “Songs My
Mom Taught Me” (Dvorak). 4.37 p.m.:
“Solar” information service. 4.40 p.m.: Romano’s
Dance Orchestra, performed by. Bennie Abra-
hams. 4.50 p.m.: J. Knight Barnett, entei-
tainer. 5 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes..
Kathleen Nichols, soprano (a) “Carissima”
(Penn), (b) “Down within the Forest” (Ronald),
(c) “The Star” (Rogers). 5.9 p.m.: “Solar”
information service. 5.12 p.m.: Pianoforte repro-
duction. 5.22 p.m.: Common music. 5.32
p.m.: Producers’ Distributing Society’s poul-
strive report. 5.35 p.m.: Racing resume. 5.37
p.m.: Options of the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s session; music and
leisure. 6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information service and late sport-
ing. 6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet. 7.10
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania.
7.12 p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s report; climate report and
forecast by courtesy of Authorities meteor-
ologist; Producers’ Distributing Society’s
fruit and vegetable market report; grain and
fodder report (“Solar”); dairy produce re-
port (“Solar”). 7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss
Bam in promoting talks and nonsense. 7.55
p.m.: Programme and different bulletins.
EVENING SESSION.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes. From the
King’s Cross Theatre, The King’s Cross
Orchestra, beneath the conductorship of E.
J. Roberts.
8.20 p.m.: From the Studio, Madame Lilian
Gibson, contralto.
8.27 p.m.: Pianoforte solos by G. Vern
Barnett. ok
8.37 p.m.: Clement Q. Williams, baritone.
8.44 p.m.: The Music Makers.
(a) “Reverie” (Debussy).
(b) “Malaguena” (Moszkowski). i
8.54 p.m.: Climate report and forecast.
8.55 p.m.: “Week by Week,” a topical speak
by S. H. Bowden.
9.10 p.m.: Ivy Inexperienced, soprano.
9.17 p.m.: The Music Makers—
(a) “Canzone A’Amore” (Lorvitz).
(b) “Crown Diamonds” (Auber).
9.27 p.m.: Madame Lilian Gibson, contralto.
9.34 p.m.: The Music Makers—
(a) “The Marriage of Figaro” (Mozart).
(b) “Serenade” (Salcede).
9.44 p.m.: Clement Q. Williams, baritone.
9.51 p.m.: The Music Makers —
“Les Preludes” (Liszt).
10.Three p.m.: Ivy Inexperienced, soprano.
10.10 p.m.: From King’s Cross Theatre, The
King’s Cross Theatre Orchestra, beneath the
conductorship of E. J. Roberts.
10.27 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2GB
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness
speak, by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music,
10.30 a.m.: Girls’s session, by Miss Helen
•T Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.0
p.m.: Music. 2.5 p.m.: Girls’s radio ser-
vice, by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m.:
Music. 3.Zero p.m.: Speak. 3.15 p.m.: Shut
down. 5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s session, by
Uncle George. 7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and mar-
ket studies, by New Zealand Mortgage and
Mercantile Company, Ltd. 7.15 p.m.: Music.
B.Q p.m.: 2GB Instrumental Trio —Miss
Ada Brook, Mr. Cecil Berry, Mr. Cedric
Ashton. 8.15 p.m.: Songs, by Mr. Robert
Cottenill. 8.25 a.m.: Humorous inter-
lude, by Mr. Jack Win and Mr. Heath
Burdock. 8.30 p.m.: Violin solos, by Mr,
Cecil Berry. 8.40 p.m.: Songs, by Miss
Nancy Watkin. 8.50 p.m.: Pianoforte solos,
by Miss Mavis Tindale. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate
report. 9.3: Deal with. 9.15: Songs, by Mr.
Robert Cottenill. 9.25 p.m.: ’Cello solos,
by Mr. Cedric Ashton. 9.35 p.m.: A hu-
morous interlude. 9.40 p.m.: 2GB Instru-
psychological Trio. 9.55 p.m.: Songs, by Miss
Nancy Watkin. 10.5 p.m.: Orchestral
music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down.

P.45 – Murdoch’s Advert[edit]

hl».

m
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Ormond Vernier Dials
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“Lissen” Mansbridge
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P.46 – Interstate Programmes, Tuesday, January 15[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Tuesday, January 15
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION
7,15 a.m.: Specific prepare data. 7.16 a.m.:
Morning melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning workouts to
music. 7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies, market studies,
basic information, transport, sporting data. 8
a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time sign; specific
prepare Data. 8.1 a.m.: Morning melodies. 8.15
a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 11 a.m.: 3LO’s dif-
ferent dainties for the dally dinner. To-day’s radio
recipe. 11.5 a.m.: Mr. J. Howlett Ross will converse
on “Madame Curie.” 11.20 a.m.: Musical interlude.
11.25 a.m.: Mrs. Dorothy Silk will converse on “Residence-
crafts.” 11.40 a.m.: Sonora recital.
MID-DAY NEWS SESSION
12 midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign; ex-
press prepare data. 12.1 p.m.: Metallic costs re-
ceived by the Australian Mines and Metals Associa-
tion from the London Inventory Alternate at the present time; Bri-
tish Official Wi-fi information from Rugby; Reuter’s
and the Australian Press Affiliation cables; “Ar-
gus” information service. 12.15 p.m.: Newmarket inventory
gross sales; particular report by John M’Namara and Co.
MID-DAY MUSICAL SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. Accompaniste: Ag-
nes Fortune. 12.20 p.m.: The station orchestra:
Suite, “The Carnival (Montague Ring). 12.30 p.m.:
Myrtle Walsgott, contralto: “The Violin Participant”
(Horne). “A Million Little Diamonds” (Brahe). 12.37
p.m.: Inventory Alternate data. 12.40 p.m.: The
station orchestra: “First and Second Actions,
Army Symphony” (Haydn). 12.50 p.m.: Violet
Jackson, soprano 12.57- p.m.: George Findlay, piano
recital: “Minuette from Sonata In E Flat” (Mozart),
“Waltz in C Sharp Minor” (Chopin), “Two Finnish
Dances” (Palmgren), “Arabesque” (Findlay),
“Humoresque” (Dunhill). 1.12 p.m.: Meteorological
data; climate forecast for Victoria, New
South Wales, Tasmania, and Souths Australia; ocean
forecasts; river studies; rainfall. 1.19 p.m.: Myrtle
Walsgott, contralto: “Lascha ch’io pianga” (Handel).
l. p.m.: The station orchestra: Sapphic Ode
(Brahms), “Third and Fourth Actions, Army
Symphony” (Haydn). 1.37 p,m.: Violet Jackson,
soprano, “The Banks of Allan Water,” “Drink to Me
Solely With Thine Eyes” (Johnson). 1.45 p.m.: Shut
down.
, AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. Accompaniste: Ag-
nes Fortune. 1.58 p.m.: Description of Trial Hurdle.
2m, 58yds., at Warrnambool races, by Eric Welch.
2.5 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces: “I Wish to Be Alone
With Mary Brown” (Coles), “Tea Leaves” (Nichols),
“Felix the Cat” (Naustraum). 2.14 p.m.: E. Mason
Wooden, baritone: “We’ll Know, We’ll Perceive”
(Henry), “Harlequin” (Sanderson). 2.21 p.m.: The
Radl-o-Aces: “Polly” (Tamecnik), “Again in Your
Personal Yard” (Jolsori), “Let a Smile Be Your
Umbrella” (Fain). 2.30 p.m.: Keith Desmond, elo-
cutionist: Will give a Quick recital. 2.37: Description
of Trial Handicap, 6fur., at Warrnambool races. 2.45
p.m,: The Radi-o-Aces: “Inform Me To-night” (Little),
“When You Know Me” (Baden), “I’m Sorry, Sally”
(Kahn). 2.54 p.m.: Victor Baxter, tenor: “When My
Ships Come Crusing Residence” (Dorel), “Little French
Child” (Grant). 3.1 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces: “Dream
Home” (Fox), “Jeannine” (Gilbert), “Pink’ Head”
(Embury). 3.10 p.m.: Maisie Ramsay, soprano: “The
Backyard of Happiness” (V/ood), “Rosebuds” (Arditi).
3.17 p.m,: Description of Booval Steeplechase, 2 miles.
Warrnambool raees. 3.25 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces:
“Sentimental Child” (Palmer), “In My Bouquet of
Reminiscences” (Lewis), “Jazz Grasp,” piano solo (Could-
eral). 3.34 p.m.: E. Mason Wooden: “Sea Fever” (Ire-
land), “My Little Banjo.” 3.41 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces – “Girl of. Love” (Nausbaum), “Hum and
Strum” (Meyers), “Don’t Cry( Child” (Kahn). 3.50
p.m.: Keith Desmond, elocutionist, will give a brief
recital. 3.58 p.m.: Description of Summer season Handi-
cap, one mile, at Warrnambool races. 4.5 p.m.:
The Radi-o-Aces: “Constantinople” (Carlton), “That
Melody of Love” (Donaldson), “Something You Say”
(Donaldson). 4.14 p.m.: Maisie Ramsay, soprano:
“O, Flower of All of the World” (Finden), “Lullaby 1 ’
(Coutt). 4.21 p.m.: The Radl-o-Aces: “In a Bam-
boo Backyard” (Donaldson), “The Finest Issues In
Life Are Free” (Henderson), “Fortunate In Love” (Hen-
derson). 4.30 p.m.: Victor Baxter, tenor: “The place’er
You Stroll” (Handel), “I Heard You Go By” (Wooden).
4.37 p.m.: Description of Girl Bay Hurdle Race, 2
m. 58 yards., Warrnambool races. 4.45 p.m.: The
Radi-o-Aces: “Henry’s Made a Girl Out of Lizzie”
(O’Keefe), “Down Residence Rag” (Sweetman), “Sas-
katchewan” (Leslie), “To-day, To-morrow, Ceaselessly”
(Nichols), “Who Is aware of” (Dixon). 5 p.m.: “Herald’
information service: Inventory Alternate data. 5.8
p.m.: Description of Park Handicap, 6fur., at Warr-
nambool races. In the course of the afternoon progress scores
of the cricket matches, England v. Tasmania and
South Australia v. New South Wales, will likely be given
as they arrive handy. 5.15 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 6 p.m.: Solutions to
letters and birthday greetings by “Bobby Blue-
gum.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m.:
“Bobby Bluegum,” songs and tales.
NIGHT SESSION
Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. Accompaniste: Agnes
Fortune. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data.
7.15 p.m.: Market studies. 7.30 p.m.: Information ses-
sion. Stumps scores, cricket matches, England v.
Tasmania, at Launceston, and South Australia v.
New South Wales, at Adelaide. 7.43 p.m.: Start-
day greetings. 7.45 p.m.: Out of the previous. 7.46
p.m.; Below the auspices of the College Exten-
sion Board. C. R. Lengthy, M.A., will converse on “Aus-
tralian Poets of the Pastoral Interval.” Eight p.m.: A
maker of historical past. 8.1 p.m.: Salvation Military Head-
quarters Brass Band: March, “Our Military, Courageous and
True”; Hymn tune, “Come Ye Disconsolate; refrain.
“Hallelujah.” 8.15 p.m.: Maisie Ramsay, soprano:
“Carmena” (Lane Wilson), “Dan Cupid” (Mana-
Zueca). 8.22 p.m.: Salvation Military Headquarters
Brass Band: Cornet solo, “Silver Threads”; selec-
tion, “Gems from the Messiah.” 8.37 p.m.: Ber-
nard Manning, bass-baritone (by permission, J. C
Williamson, Ltd.): “Within the Silent Night time” (Rach-
maninoff), “Invictus” (Huha). 8.44 pm.: Salvation
Military Headquarters Brass Band: March, “The Con-
queror”: refrain, “Gloria”; choice, “English Melo-
dies.” 9 p.m.: Maisie Ramsay, soprano: “Magdalen
at Michael’s Gate” (Lehmann). “Songster’s Awaken-
ing” (Fletcher). 9.7 p.m.: Professor R. J. A.
Berry: “The Very Human Metropolis of Chicago.” 9.22
p.m.: Bernard Manning, bass-baritone: “Come Into
the Backyard, Maud,” “Go Not, Comfortable Day” (Somer-
ville). 930 p.m.: Transmission from the Victory
Theatre, St. Kilda: The Victory Theatre Orchestra,
beneath the path of Henri Penn. 10.40: “Argus”
information service; meteorological data; British
official wi-fi information from Rugby: bulletins;
sporting notes by “Olympus.” 10.50: The Radi-o-
Aces: “Something You Say” (Donaldson), “In a Bam-
boo Backyard” (Donaldson), “Get Out and Get Below
the Moon” (Tobias), “That’s My Weak spot Now’
(Stept), “Nebraska” (Aitken), “Ceaselessly Extra” (Ben-
nett), “Roses of Yesterday” (Berlin), “It Goes Like
This” (Caesar). “Is It Gonna Be Lengthy?” (Whiting),
“The Dance of the Blue Danube” (Fisher), “Good-
evening Waltz (Bibo), “Goodnight Track.” 11.40 p.m.:
God Save the King.
3AR
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 10.Zero a.m.: G.P.O-
clock says “Ten.” 10.1 a.m.: “Age” Inventory Alternate
studies. London steel market. 10.10 a.m.: “Age”
market studies. Farm and station produce, fruit,
fish, greens, and many others. • 10.25 a.m.: “Age” transport
studies. Ocean forecast. 10.30 a.m.: Mail notices,
Specific prepare’ data. 10.35 a.m.: “Age” information
service, unique to 3AR. 10.59 a.m.; Climate
forecast.
MORNING MUSICAL SESSION.
11.Zero a.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “Simply Like
a Melody Out of the Sky” (Donaldson). “Rain”
(Ford). “Mine, All Mine” (Ruby). “Dolores”
(Kassell). “Down The place the Solar Goes Down”
(Jones). 11.20 a.m.: Vocal variations. 11.26 a.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “Don’t Maintain Me within the
Darkish, Vivid Eyes” (Bryan). “All Day Lengthy”
(Cross). “Comfortable-go-lucky Lane” (Lewis). “Little
Log Cabin of Goals” (Hanley). “Virginia Creeper”
(Wade). 11.46 a.m.: Vocal variations. 11.52 a.m.:
New Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Lenora” (Gilbert).
“Dream Kisses” (Yellen). “With out You, Candy-
coronary heart” (de Silva). “Lolita” (Stoneham). “Missis-
sippi Mud” (Harris). 12.12 p.m.: Vocal variations.
12.18 p.m.: British official wi-fi information. Announce-
ments. 12.22 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces, “Up
and Down” (Rose). “Inform Me Once more” (Clark). “Excessive
Up on a Hilltop” (Baer). “A Lonesome Boy’s Ros-
ary” (Tobias). “The Dance of the Blue Danube”
(Fisher). 12.48 n.m.: Vocal variations. 12.54 n.m.:
Ned Tyrrell’s Radi-o-Aces. “The Riff Track” (Rom-
berg). “Chinatown” (Yvnin). “What Was I to
Do?” (Reid). “Subsequent to You, I Like Me Subsequent to
You” (Rito). “Shake It Down” (Williams). 1.14
p.m.: Vocal variations. 1.20 p.m.: Ned Tyrrell’s
Radi-o-Aces. “Lonely Acres” (Robinson). “Any-
factor You Say” (Donaldson). “In a Bamboo Gar-
den” (Donaldson). 1.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EVENING SESSION.
6.Zero p.m.: “Candy Solace on the Seraphina.”
NIGHT SESSION.
Announoer: Frank Hatherley. Aceomoanist: Reg.
Brown. 8.Zero p.m.: Mme. Soward. A Speak to Stu-
dents of French. 8.15 p.m.: A. W. Jackson will
converse on “Golf.” 8.30 p.m.; The station orchestra
“First Motion, Pathetiaue Symphony”- (Tschai-
kowsky). 8.45 p.m.: Violet Jackson (soprano).
“The Nightingales of Lincoln’s Inn” (H. Oliver)
“Down Vauxhall Method,” from Songs of Outdated London.
8.52 p.m.: The station orchestra. Suite, “St. Anne’s
Eve” (Coleridge Tavlor). 9.2 p.m.: Keith Desmond.
“The Quip Mcdest.” 9.9 n.m.: One-act nlay. “Fol-
lowers,” by Harold Brighouse. Lucinda Raines
Winifred Moverley: Helen Masters, Lola Martin;
Susan Crowther, Ivy Broadley: Colonel Redfern,
Y. Bernard Lamble. Scene: Miss Baines’ parlor
in Cranford. June. 1859. 9.29 n.m.: Bulletins.
9.31 p.m.: The station orchestra. Choice, “The
Blue Kitten” (Friml). Chosen. 9.40 p,m.: Viva
Holgate Clarke (niano). “Pastorale and Cappriceio”
(Scarletto). “Prelude In G Minor” (Chooin). “Musi-
cal BoX” (Liadow). 9.53 p.m.: Violet Jackson
(soprano). “The place Violets Develop” (Forster).
“Snowflakes” (Cowan). 10.Zero p.m.: The station
orchestra. “Rondo Capriccio” (Beethoven). 10.7
p.m.: Keith Desmond. “The Retort Courteous.”
10 14 p.m.: The station orchestra “Songs With out
Phrases” (Tebikoff). 10.20 p.m.: “Age” information ser-
vice, unique to 3AR. 10.30 p.m.: God Save the
King.
4QG .
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
745 a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information service.
8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical information. 8.15 a.m.: Information
service 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
110 a.m.: Music. 11.5 a,m.: Social information. 11.15
a.m.: Lecturette, speak on “Residence Crafts,” by Mrs. R.
L. Reid. 11.45 a.m : Wurlitzer organ. 12.Zero midday:
Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
1.Zero p.m.: Market studies and climate data.
1.20 pm.: Lunch-hour music. 2.(ok.p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero p.m.: A programme of electrically-reproduced
information. 3.30 p.m,: Mail prepare operating instances. 4.15
p.m.: This afternoon’s information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
8.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; mail informa-
tion: transport information. 6.5 p.m.: Dinner music. 6.25
p.m: Industrial bulletins. 6.30 p.m.: Mattress-
time tales, performed by “Uncle Ben.” 7.Zero p.m.:
Mews briefly. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate information.
1.6 p.m.: Metallic quotations. 7.7 p.m,: Market re-
ports. 7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.:
Climate data. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins.
7.43 p.m.: Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lec-
ture tte, “A Speak on Pictures,” by Mr. F. L.
South (supervisor, Kodak, Ltd.).
NIGHT SESSION.
8.Zero pm.: From the studio, the Orpheans on tour.
9,Zero p.m.: Metropolitan climate forecast. 10.Zero p.m.:
The “Every day Mail” information, the “Courier” information, climate
information: the “Quenslander” bi-weekly information service for
distant listeners. Shut down.
6WF
12.30 p.m.: Tune in. 12.35: Markets, information, and
cables. 1 p.m.: Time sign. 1.1 p.m.: Climate
notes equipped by the Meterological Bureau of West
Australia; station bulletins. 1.2 j>.m.: The
Studio Quintette, performed by Mr. Val Smith, will
play choices from their repertoire. 2 p.m.: Shut
down. 3.30 p.m.: Tune in. 3.35 p.m.: Pianoforte
choices by Miss Audrey Dean; vocal and instru-
psychological numbers from the studio. 4.30 p.m.: Shut
down. 645 p.m.: Tune in. 6.48 p.m.: Tales for
the kiddies by Uncle Percy. 7.5 p.m.: Gadgets by the
Studio Trio. 7.30 p.m.: Shares, markets, information. 7.45
p.m.: Speak by Mr. J. P. Bathgate: “Books of the
Month.” Eight p.m.: sign. 8.1 p.m.: Climate
notes equipped by the Meteorological Bureau of West
Australia; station bulletins, similar to alterations
to programmes, and many others. 8.Three p.m.: Live performance by 6WF’s
Station Orchestra, performed by Mr. W. A. Wilkins.
9 p.m.; Late information objects by courtesy of “The Every day
Information” Newspaper Co. Ships inside vary announce-
ment; climate report and forecast: station an-
nouncements. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down. 104.5-metre
transmission: Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5-metres
of programme given on 1250 metres, commencing at
6.45 p.m.
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSION.
11 30 a.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 11.34 a.m.: Mid-
lands climate forecast. 11.35 a.m.: Columbia broad-
casts. 11.55 a.m.: Tasmanian stations, 9 a.m.
weal her report. 12 midday: G.P.O. clock chimes the
hour. 12.1 p.m.: Transport data; ships with-
in wi-fi vary; mail notices; housewives’ information.
12.Eight p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 12.11 p.m.: British
official wi-fi information. 12.20 p.m.: Columbia
broadcasts. 12.29 p.m.: Bulletins, 12.33
p.m.. Columbia broadcasts. 12.55 p.m.: “Mer-
cury” particular information service. 1.10 p.m.: Columbia
broadcasts. 1.30 p.m.: Shut down. 2.Zero p.m.: Run-
ning description of Trial Hurdle Race, two miles
58 yards, run at Warrnambool racecourse, Warrnam-
bcol, Victoria. 2.5 p.m.: Shut down. 2.40 p.m.:
Working description of Trial Handicap, six furlongs,
r< n at Warrnambool racecourse, Warrnambool, Vic- toria. 2.45 p.m.: Shut down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock shimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 3,Four p.m.: Particular climate In- formation. 3.5 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 3.20 p m.: Working description of Booval Steeplechase, two miles, run at Warrnambool racecourse, Warr- r.ambool, Victoria. 3.25 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 4.Zero pm.: Working description of Summer season Handicap, one mile, run at Warrnambool racecourse, Warrnam- bool, Victoria. 4.5 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 4.40 p.m.: Working descrintion of Girl Hurdle Race, two milts 58 yards, run at Warrnambool racecourse, Warrnambool, Victoria. 4.45 p.m.: Columbia broad- solid::. 5.10 p.m.: Working description of Park Han- cicap. six furlongs, run at Warrnambool racecourse, Warrnambool. Victoria. 5.15 p.m.: All sporting re- sults to, hand. 5.30 p.m.: Shut down. In the course of the afternoon progress outcomes will likely be given of the cricket match. English XI. v. Tasmania, at Launceston. EARLY EVENING SESSION, 6.10 p.m.: Stumps scores, English XI. v. Tasmania, at Launceston. 6.15 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 6,30 p.m.. Joan O’Shea will recite to the wee people, “Se’ected.” 6.45 p.m.: Request numbers for the kids. 7.Zero p.m.: Solutions to letters and birthday greetings, by “Uncle David.” 7.5 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 7.15 p.m.: Information session. EVENING SESSION. 7 30 p.m.: Below the auspices of the 7ZL, study to swim week. L. Rodway will converse on “The Dad and mom’ Responsibility and How They Can Assist.” 7.45 p.m.: W. E. Fullr will converse on “Literary Lapses and Library Lists.” 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the hour. 8.6 p.m.: Columbia broadcasts. 6-30 p.m.: A musical programme, organized by Claude Pross and his “Gloomchasers”—Enjoyable and frolic. “O, Doris, The place Do You Dwell?” “Maggie, Sure, Ma!” “Ramona,” ‘ When You Performed the Organ,” “Constantinople,” “I’m Wingin’ Residence.” “Put Your Arms The place They Belong,” “Shine on Harvest Moon”’ “Breeze,” “That Saxophone Waltz,” “Desert Track,” “Get Out and Get Below the Moon,” “Tune In on Happiness,” ‘ Mocnlight on the Ganges,” “On a Dew Dewy Day.” 3.50 p.m.: Information session. 10.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock ch'mes the hour. 10.Three p.m.: God Save the King. 10 Four pm.: Shut down.

P.47 – Gilbert-Lodge & Co[edit]

4 @
Q71
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– 1
09:” –
W
m
Jpg”
Wi
is price
P A E m %
for
m
n
—and so we declare that in providing the ‘‘Fuller” Sparta
Accumulator to the general public we’re supplying a long-felt need.
Excessive-tension.
Costs embrace value of filling with acid and charging.
Stocked by
Harringtons Ltd., Metropolis
Fox and Magillicuddy, Metropolis
Weldon Electrical Provide Co. Ltd., Metropolis
John Danks, Ltd., Metropolis
H. J. Goleby, Metropolis
Swain and Co., Ltd., Metropolis
S. G. Moffatt, Newtown.
uiigsutn
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IF YOUR DEALER HAS NO STOCK OF FULLER BATTERIES
COMMUNICATE WITH US
GILBERT-LODGE & Co. Ltd.
188 King Avenue, Melbourne.
26 KING STREET, SYDNEY
Phone : 87934
Newton McLaren, Ltd.,
Leigh Avenue Adelaide.

P.48 – Native Programmes, Wednesday, January 16[edit]

Native Programmes, Wednesday, January 16
2FC
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane
7. a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
7.2 a.m.: Official climate forecast; rainfall;
river studies; temperatures; astronomical
memoranda. 7.7 a.m.: “Sydney Morning
Herald” abstract. 7.12 a.m-: Transport in-
telligence; mail companies. 7.15 a.m.: Studio
music. 7.25 a.m.: Funding market; min-
ing sharemarkets; steel quotations. 7.28
a.m.: Wool gross sales; breadstuffs markets; inter-
state markets; produce markets. 7.40
am-: Studio music. 8.Zero a.m.: “Eig Ben.” Shut
down.
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane
10.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.Three a.m-: Pianoforte replica. 10.10
a.m.: “Sydney Morning Herald” information ser-
vice. 10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.45
a.m.: A chat on “Residence • Cooking and Re-
cipes, by Miss Ruth Furst. 11.Zero a.m.: “Huge
Ben”; A.P.A. and Reuters cable companies.
11.5 a.m.: Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
1? midday: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
12.1 p.m.: Inventory Alternate, first name. 12.3
p.m.: Official climate forecast; rainfall.
12.5 p.m.: Studio music- 1.30 p.m.: Inventory
Alternate, second name. 1.32 p.m.: Climate
forecast. 1.34 p.m.: “Night Information” mid-
day information service; Producers’ Distributing
Societys report. 1.42 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi
information. 1.45 p.m.: Studio music. 2-Zero p.m.: “Huge
Ben. Shut down.
Be aware —Race outcomes will likely be broadcast as
obtained.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer:: Lau rence Halbert.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32. p.m.: Chosen document recital. 3.0
pm.: Huge Ben”; pianoforte replica.
3.15 p.m.: Common music. 3.30 p.m.: Jill
Valentine, within the newest songs. 3.37 pm-
2″£? Fak ° la ’ 3.44 p.m.: Cricket
scores. 345 p.m.: A studying. 4.Zero p.m.:
b ß l g B iV Jill Valentine, standard num-
-Four 7 p.m:: From the Wentworth—
the Wentworth Cafe Dance Orchestra, beneath
the path of Jimmy Elkins- 4.20 pm •
Four Fr ,°7 m ‘ he n StU( ? io – Carlos Fakola > Pianist-‘
427 p.m.. Common music. 4.30 p.m.: Cric-
0r^ S ‘ t’ 32 p – m ‘ : p °PUiar music. 4.35 p.m. •
Inventory Alternate, third name: 4.37 pm •
dovra af mUSIC ‘ s ‘° P-m ‘ : “ Huge Ben ”: shut
EARLY EVENING SESSION
– Announcer: A. S. Cochrane
T£ e ?, himes of 2FC. 5.45 p.m-:
The Good day Man” talks to the youngsters—
Py Uncle – Ted and “Sandy”; letters
ai Jd . s^? n . es ’ niusic and leisure 6-Three r
?t^-ki Dalg « market sports activities (wool, wheat,
markets F c™ it; , and vegetable
markets. 6.43 p.m.: Inventory Alternate in-
formation. 6.45 p.m.: Weathe. and shin-
-6*50 n e m S; t^-‘ 48 P ‘ m h Ru § b y wi.Ness information.
“Rii sportm g n ews. 7.Zero p.m.:
,ss? ’ .iate information service. 7.10 pm ■
Okay e S“ ner Quartette – ducted bv
EVENING SESSION
Announcer: Laurence Halbert
Accompanist: Ewart Chapnle.
7an f ™ a S d dlrected by xzfiflffffi b
7.40 p.m.. Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte renroduction.
7.54 p.m.: Common music.
8.Zero p.m.. Huge Ben.” A classical programme
organized and directed by Horace Keats.
°™ f e ’ The Barber of Seville’ (Ros-
Keats Orchestral conductor, Horace
8.Eight p.m-: Tenor Soli—
Ceas – e th y Singing, Maiden Honest”
(Rachmaninoff).

i,a2£ the Silence of Night time” (Rach-

maninoff) .
8.15 P-m.: “Sonatina in G for Violin and
Piano (Dvorak). Dulcie Blair, violinist.
Zero Horace Keats, pianist.
8.35 p.m.: dement Q. Williams.
a() ‘Imaginative and prescient Fugitive” (Massenet).
(b) L’heure Exquise” (Hahn).
(c) “O Males from the Fields (Hughes).
(d) “The Moon Cradle” (Hughes).
Horace Keats
who has
organized
tonights
classical
programme
from 2FC.
(e) “The Horrible Robber Males” (Hughes).
8.50 p.m.: “Siegfried Idyl” (Wagner).
The Orchestra.
9.5 p.m.: A chat by C. R. Corridor—“ Out and
About Iraq and Persia —The Girls of
Bagdad.”
9.20 p.m.: (a) “Rhapsodie and Three Gipsy
Songs” (Brahms).
(b) “Slavonic Dance” (Dvorak).
The Orchestra.
9.35 pm.: A Group of Trendy Songs.
(a) “A Lady’s Final Phrase” (Bantqck).
(b) “Weathers” (Eire).
(c) “Blossom Track” (O’Neill).
(d) “Golden Hair” (Bridge).
Miss le Brun Brown.
9.45 p.m.: Two Pianos —the gamers being
Ewart Chappie and Horace Keats.
(a) “Pas des Cymbales” (Chaminade).
(b) “Grand Tarantella” (Gottschalk).
9.54 p.px: Tenor Soli —Alfred Wilmore.
(a) “Standchen” (Schubert).
(b) “Friihlengsfluten” (Rachmani .off).
10.2 p.m.: The Orchestra, performed by
Horace Keats, will play “a Tribute x to
Franz Liszt” (Morena).
10.27 p.m.: To-morrow’s programme.
2BL
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
8.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metro-
politan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State
climate report. 8.2 a.m.: Studio music.
8.15 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; information
from the “Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.25
a.m.: Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes. 8.35 a.m.: Data; mails;
transport, arrivals, departures, and sailings.
8.38 a.m.: Information from the “Every day Telegraph
Pictorial.” 8.45 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; studio music. 9.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock
and chimes; studio music. 9.30 a.m.: Half
an hour with silent mates. 10.Zero a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes. Shut down.
MID-DAY SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11.Zero a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation session, conduc-
ted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.: Advert-
vertising hints. 11.40 a.m.: Girls’s ses-
sion. performed by Mrs. Cranfield. 12.0
Midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast and climate report. 12.3
p.m.: Pianoforte replica. 12.30 p.m..
Transport and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market re-
ports. 12.48 p.m.: “Solar” mid-day information ser-
vice 1.Zero p.m.: Studio music. 1.30 p.m.:
Speak to kids, and particular leisure
for youngsters in hospitals. 2.Zero p.m,: G.P.O
Clock and chimes. Shut down. Be aware.—
Race outcomes.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3,45 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes; cricket scores.
England v. Tasmania. 3.46 p.m.: Pianoforte
replica. 4.Zero p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, performed by Bennie Abrahams
4.10 p.m.: Kathleen Nichols, soprano, from
the studio —(a). “Daybreak” (Curran); (b) “Over
the Waters Blue” (Clarke). 4.17 p.m.: A
speak —Romance of New Guinea Gold. 4.30
p.m.: Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania.
4.32 p.m.: Common music. 4.40 p.m.: Ro-
mano’s Dance Orchestra, performed by Ben-
nie Abrahams. 4.50 p.m.: From the Studio—
Common music. 5.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; “Solar” information service. 5.10 p.m.:
Pianoforte replica. 5.20 p.m.: Popu-
lar music. 5.30 p.m.: Racing resume. 5.37
p.m.: Options of the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcers: J. Knight Barnett, Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s session; music and
leisure. 6.Zero p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartette. 7.10 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania. 7.12
p.m.; Australian Mercantile Land and Fin-
ance Co.’s report; climate report and fore-
solid, by courtesy of Authorities Meteorolo-
gist; Producers’ Distributing Society’s fruit
and vegetable market report; grain and fod-
der report (“Solar”); dairy produce report
(“Solar”). 7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam
in promoting talks and nonsense. 7.55 p.m,:
Programme and different bulletins.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Sydney Calland, baritone —
(a) “Was I the Streamlet” (Lloyd).
(b) “Wait For Me” (Matheson).
8.7 p.m.: J. Knight Barnett and Dorothy
Dewar, entertainers.
8.17 p.m.: Foster and Finlay, m musical
recollections.
8.27 p.m.: Studio manufacturing of Oscar Wilde’s
play, “A Lady Of No Significance,” by
the H. W. Varna Firm.
Girl Hunstanton —Cleo Glover.
Mr. Allonby—Betty Wall.
Girl Caroline Pontefract —Jean Morice.
Hester Worsley—Phyllis Clegg.
Gerald Arbuthnot —Gordon Trilling.
Alice (Maid)—-Miss Cooipbe.
Mrs. Arbuthnot—Muriel Conner.
Lord Illingworth—H. W. Varna.
ACT I.—Drawing-room at Girl Hunstan-
ton’s.
ACT ll.—The identical.
ACT lll.—Sitting-room at Mrs. Arbuth-
not’s.
9.27 p.m.: Climate report and forecast; The
Savoyans Dance Band.
9.37 p.m.: J. Knight Barnett and Dorothy
Dewar, entertainers.
9.47 p.m.: Sydney Calland, baritone—
(a) “Ten ‘Thousand Years From Now”
(Ball).
(b) “Coaling” (Helmor).
9.54 p.m.: Foster and Finlay, in musical
recollections.
10.Four p.m.: The Savoyans Dance Band.
10.14 p.m.: Ivy Saxton, in standard songs.
10.21 p.m.: The Savoyans Dance Band.
10.31 p.m.: Late climate report and fore-
-10.32 p.m.: Ivy Saxton, in standard songs.
10.37 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.59 p.m.: The Savoyans Dance Band. Dur-
ing the intervals between dance objects
“Solar” information will likely be given.
11.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.
2GB
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness
speak, by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 .a.m.: Music,
10.30 a.m.: Girls’s session, by Miss Helen
J. Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.0
p.m.: Music. 2.5 p.m.: Girls’s radio ser-
vice, by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 2.50 p.m.:
Music. 3.Zero p.m.: Speak. 3.15 p.m.: Shut
down. 5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s session, ky
Uncle George. 7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market
studies, by New Zealand Mortgage and Mer-
cantile Company, Ltd. 7.15 p.m.: Music
8.Zero p.m.: Mayo Hunter and Gladys. 8.10
p.m.: Songs, by Miss Alcia Haywood. 8.20
p.m.: A humorous interlude, by Mr. Jack
Win and Mr. Heath Burdock. 8.25 p.m.:.
Violin solos, by Mr. Edmund Collins. 8.35 i
p.m.: Songs, by Mr. Cecil Houghton. 8.45
p.m.: Pianoforte solos, by Mr. John Beson.
8.55 p.m.: A humorous interlude. 9.Zero p.m.:
Climate report. 9.Three p.m.: Deal with. 9.15
pm.: Mayo Hunter and Gladys. 9.25 p.m,:
Songs, by Miss Alcia Haywood. 9.35 p.m.:
Violin solos, by Mr. Edmund Collins. 9.45
p.m,: A humorous interlude. 9.50 p.m.;
Songs, by Mr. Cecil Houghton. 10.Zero p.m.:
Orchestral music. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down,

P.49 – Columbia Radio Batteries Advert[edit]

Why the Columbia Layerbilt is the
most economical “B” Battery to make use of
FLAT layers of cells, pressed one in opposition to the othyr,
with no waste house in between, guarantee higher energy
and longer life from the Columbia Layerbilt “B” Battery
than it’s doable to acquire from every other battery of
equal measurement utilizing spherical cells.
This Layerbilt development.. .unique with Columbia
•.. insures way more electrical producing materials and
for much longer life. It means a higher quantity, extra
readability, and longer distance reception out of your re-
ceiving set.
No different “B” Battery equals the Columbia Layerbilt
for efficiency, satisfaction and real economic system.
Made by the world’s largest radio battery manu-
facturer … on the market in every single place.
Columbia
RADIO BATTERIES
they last more
Manufacturing unit Consultant**
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Made by the manufac*
lurers of the well-known,
Columbia Dry QclL

P.50 – Interstate Programmes, Wednesday, January 16[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Wednesday, January 16
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION
7.15 a.m.: Morning melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morn-
ing workouts to music. 7.30 a.m.: Inventory re-
ports. market studies, basic information, transport, and
sporting data. 8.Zero a.m.: Melbourne Obser-
vatory time sign. 8.1 a.m.: Morning melodies.
8.15 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 11.Zero a.m.. 3LO s
totally different dainties for the every day dinner; To-day s
Radio Recipe—Lemon jelly. 11.5 a.m.: Miss I. D.
Beaven, “Residence-made Confectionery.” 11.20 a.m.:
Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m.: Mrs. M. Callaway
Mahood, coloration in ornament. 11.40 a.m.: Sonora
recital
MIDDAY NEWS SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 12.Zero midday. Mel-
bourne Observatory time sign; specific prepare in-
formation. 12.1 p.m.: British official wi-fi information
from Rugby; Reuter’s and the Australian Press
Affiliation cables; “Argus” information service. 12.15
p.m.; Newmarket inventory gross sales; particular report by
John M’Namara and Co.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. Accompanists:
Agnes Fortune. 12.20 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces,
“Ceaselessly Extra” (Burnet), “Nebraska” (Revel),
“Clarinet Marmalade” (Fergus). 12.29 p.m.: Mai-
sie Ramsay (soprano), “The Lass with the Deli-
cate Air” (Anne), “Three Inexperienced Bonnets” (DHar-
delot). 12.36 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data.
12 40 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, “Ramona” (Wayne),
“Rain” (Ruby), “I Like to Dunk a Hunk of Sponge
Cake” (Castill). 12.49 p.m.: Keith Desmond, elo-
cutionist, will give a brief recital. 12.53 p.m.:
The Radi-o-Aces. “As a result of My Child Don t Imply
Possibly Now” (Donaldson), “Beloved (Kahn) Simply
Like a Melody Out of the Sky” (Donaldson). 1.5
p.m.: Meteorological data; climate fore-
solid for Victoria. South Australia, New South
Wales, and Tasmania; ocean forecast, river re-
ports; rainfall. 1.12 p.m.: Bernard Manning, bass
(by permission of J. C. Williamson, Ltd.), Down
Among the many Useless Males” (Outdated English), Sigh No
Extra, Women” (Aitken). 1.19 P ; m.: Th e Radi-o-
Aces “Lazv Ft’—piano solo (Masman) , That s
What You Imply to Me” (Davis), “Chloe’ (Kahn).
1.28 p.m.: Maisie Ramsay (soprano) v I Handed By
Your Window” (Brahe), Lackaday (Crampton).
135 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces, Lenora (Gilbert),
“That P Stolen Melody” (Fisher), “Guess Who’s in
City” (Razalf). 1.45 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. . Accompaniste.
Aanes Fortune. 2.15 p.m.: Description of Tiial
Stakes, 6 furlongs, . at „A m h teU o
Warrnambool, by Eric Welch. 2.20 p.m.. The sta
tion orchestra, “Tarantella” (Bohn), Andante Mel-
odic” (Rachmaninoff). 2.29 p.m.: „» ack |o7
(soDrano), “Danny Boy,” “Irish People Track. 2.37
p m P : The Station Orchestra, suite. Silhouettes
(Hadley). 2.47 p.m.: John Byrne (bass), ..elected.
2.54 p.m.: Description of Hurdle Race, 2 miles 58
yards. Newbie Turf Membership races, at Warrnambool.
Three 1 pm.: The Station Orchestra, ‘Whims (Schu-
mann), “Naiad’s Idyl” (M‘Coy). 3.Eight pm : George
Findlay (piano). “Gavotte and Musette (d Albert),
“Romance in E Flat” (Rubinstein), Polonaise in
A Sir” “Nation Gardens” (Grain-
ger) 323 p.m.: Description of Summer season Handicap
1 mile, Newbie Turf Membership races at WarrnambooL
3.30 p.m.: Tom Masters (tenor), “There s a -Land
(Allitsen), “I’m a’longin’ for you (Hathaway). 3.37
p.m.: The Station Orchestra, “Scenes de Ballet
rfilazounow) “Floods of —————— ’ (R&climsniriofT).
3*47 p.m.: Ella Riddell (contralto), “I Will Await
Thee” (Coningsby-Clarke), “My Coronary heart’B Need
(Coningsby-Clarke). 3.54 p.m.: The Station Or-
chestra, chosen. 4.Three p.m.: Description P°ny
Race, 5 furlongs, Newbie Turf Membership races at Warr-
nambool. 410 p.m.: Tasma Tiernan (’cello), Medi-
tation” (Massenet). 4.15 p.m.: Violet Jaokscn

P.51 – Stromberg-Carlson Advert[edit]

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Learn this Distinctive Liberal
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We acknowledge receipt of the Assure Coupon
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P.52 – Native Programmes, Thursday, January 17[edit]

Native Programmes, Thursday, January 17
2FC
MORNING SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane
10.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben” and bulletins.
10.2 a.m.: Pianoforte choice. 10.10 a.m.:
“Sydney, Morning Herald” information service.
10.25 a.m.: Studio music. 10.30 a.m,:
Final minute sporting data by the
2FC Racing Commissioner. 10.40 a.m.:
Studio music. 11.Zero a.m.: “Huge Ben.” A.P.A.
and Reuter’s cable services- 11.5 a.m.:
Shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane
12.Zero midday: ‘Huge Ben” and bulletins.
12.Three p.m.: Official climate forecast; rainfall;
12.5 p.m.: Studio music. 12.10 p.m.: sum-
mary of stories, “Sydney Morning Herald.”
12.15 p.m.: Rugby wi-fi information. 12.18
p.m.: Dickens’s studying by A. S. Cochrane.
12.30 p.m.: Studio music. 1.Zero p.m-: “Huge
Ben”; climate intelligence. 1.Three p.m.: “Even-
ing Information” noon information service; Producers’
Distributing Socieyt’s report. 1.20 p.m.:
Studio music. 1.50 p.m.: Final minute
sporting data by the 2FC Racing
Commissioner. 2.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Shut
down.
AFTERNOON SESSION
Announcer:: Laurence Halbert.
2.30 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
2.32 p.m.: Academic session for the
faculties; quick musical recital. 3.Zero p.m.:
From Christ Church, St. Laurence, organ re-
cital, organized by Christian Hellemann- 3.20
p.m.: Isabel Thiselton, soprano—(a) “A Track
of Sunshine” (Bunning); (b) “Starry Woods”
(Phillips). 3.27 p.m.: Common music. 3.34
p.m.: Isabel Thiselton, soprano—(a) “Love’s
Valley” (Forster); -(b) “Butterfly Wings”
(Phillips). 3.40 p.m.: From Christ Church,
St. Laurence —organ recital, organized by
Christian Hellemann. 4.Zero p.m.: From the
Studio—a studying. 4.20 p.m.: From Christ
Church, St. Laurence—Organ recital, ar-
ranged by Christian Hellemann. 4.40 p.m.:
From the Studio —Common music. 4.45 p.m.:
Inventory Alternate, third name. 4.47 p.m.:
Common music. 5.Zero p.m.: Shut down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION
Announcer: A. S. Cochrane.
5.40 p.m.: The Chimes of 2FC- 5.45 p.m.:
The “Good day Man’ conducts the Youngsters’s
Session; letters and tales; music and enter-
tainment. 6.30 p.m.: Dalgety’s market re-
ports (wool, wheat, and inventory). 6.40 p-m.:
Fruit and vegetable markets. 6.43 p.m.:
Inventory Alternate report. 6.45 p.m.: Climate
and transport information. 6.48 p.m.: Rugby wire-
much less information. 6.50 p-m.: Late sporting information.
7 p.m.: “Huge Ben.” Late information service.
7.10 p.m.: The 2FC Dinner Quartette, con-
ducted by Horace Keats.
EVENING SESSION
Announcer:: Laurence Halbert.
Accompanist: Ewart Chappie.
•7.40 p.m.: Programme bulletins.
7.45 p.m.: Pianoforte replica.
7.52: England v. Tasmania,’cricket scores.
7.54 p.m.: Common music.
8.Zero p.m.: “Huge Ben.” From the Capitol Theatre.
The Capitol Unit Leisure.
8.20 p.m.: From the Studio—
Eileen Boyd, contralto—
(a) “The Enchantress” (Hatton).
(b) “How Did Everyone Study” (Ewing).
8.27 p.m.: Joan Fry, pianist—
(a) “Jeux d’eau” (Ravel).
(b) “Tango” (Albeniz).
8.37 p.m.: Gwladys Evans and Robert Gil-
bert, vocal duets —
(a) Duet from “Don Giovanni’ (Mozart).
(b) Duet from “Veronique” (Messager).
8.47 p.m.: To-night’s Competitors, performed
by Scott Alexander.
9.2: Climate report and forecast.
9.Three p.m-: Joan Fry, pianist—
“ Ballade F Minor” (Chopin).
9.11 p.m.: Eileen Boyd, contralto—
(a) “Coronary heart’s Ease” (Willebey).
(b) “Might I Overlook” (Arnold).
9.18 p.m.: From the Capitol Theatre—
The Capitol Unit Leisure.
9.40 p.m.: From the Studio—
“ Chronicles of Creamy Creek”—advised by the
Bush Parson.
9.55 p.m.: Gwladys Evans and Robert Gil-
bert, vocal duets—
(a) Duet from “La Traviata” (Verdi).
(b_> “Fowl Songs at Eventide” (Coates).
10.5 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia —
Cec Morrison’s Dance Band.
10.15 p.m.: From the Studio—
Nea Hallett, in standard numbers.
10.22 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia—
Cec Morrison’s Dance Band.
i. 0.33 pm. From the Studio —
Late climate report and forecast.
10.34 p.m.: Nea Hallett, in standard numbers.
10.41 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia—
Cec Morrison’s Dance Band.
10.57 p.m.: From the Studio —
To-morrow’s programme.
10.59 p.m.: From the Lodge Australia —
Cec Morrison’s Dance Band.
11.30 p.m-: Nationwide Anthem. Shut down.
2BL
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: A. C. C. Stevens.
Eight a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; metro-
politan climate report. 8.1 a.m.: State
climate report. 8.2: Studio music. 8.15
a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes. 8.25 a.m.:
Studio music. 8.30 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and
chimes; Studio music. 8.35 a.m.: Informa-
tion, mails, transport .arrivals, departures,
and sailings. 8.38 a.m.: Information from the
“Every day Telegraph Pictorial.” 8.45 a.m.:
G.P.O. clock and chimes; Studio music. 9.0
a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; Studio
music. 9.30 a.m.: Half an hour with silent
mates. 10 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes;
shut down.
MIDDAY SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett.
11 a.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; 2BL
Girls’s Sports activities Affiliation Session, con-
ducted by Miss Gwen Varley. 11.30 a.m.:
Promoting hints. 11.40 a.m.: Girls’s
Session, performed by Mrs. Cranfield. 12
midday: G.P.O. clock and chimes; particular
ocean forecast, and climate report. 12.3
p.m.: Pianoforte replica. 12.30 p.m.:
Transport and mails. 12.35 p.m.: Market re-
ports. 12.48 p.m.: “Solar” noon information ser-
vice. 1 p.m.: Studio music. 1.30 p.m.:
Speak to kids and particular leisure
for youngsters in hospital. 2 p.m.: G.P.O.
clock and chimes; shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: J. Knight Barnett,
Accompanist: Kathleen Roe.
3.45 p.m.: G.P.O. chimes; cricket scores,
England v. Tasmania. 3.46 p.m.: Pianoforte
replica. Four p.m.: Romano’s Dance Or-
chestra, performed by Bennie Abrahams. 4.10
p.m.: From the Studio, Captain Fred. Aarons,
Thriller Story, “Condonation.” 4.25 p.m.:
Daybreak Harding, mezzo, (a) “The Lament of
Isis” (Bantock), (b) “Within the Village” (Ban-
tock). 4.32 p.m,: James Walker, pianist,
(a) “Songs With out Phrases in A Main”
Miss
Kathleen Roe
to-night’s
accompani-
ment at 2BL.
(Mendelssohn), (b)- “Scherzo in E Minor”
(Mendelssohn). 4.38 p.m.: Romano’s Dance
Orchestra, performed by Bennie Abrahams,
4.48 p.m.: From the Studio, Daybreak Harding,
mezzo, (a) “Secrecy” (Wolf), (b) “The Gar-
dener” (Wolf). 4.55 p.m.: “Suns” information ser-
vice. 5 p.m.: Common music. 5.10 p.m.:
James Walker, pianist, “Waltz in E Minor”
(Chopin). 5.17 p.m.: “Solar” information service.
5.25 p.m.: Common music. 5.37 p.m.: Fea-
tures of the night’s programme.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
5.40 p.m.: Youngsters’s session; music and
leisure. 6 p.m.: Letters and tales.
6.30 p.m.: “Solar” information and late sporting.
6.40 p.m.: 2BL Dinner Quartet. 7.10 p.m.:
Cricket scores, England v. Tasmania. 7.12
p.m.: Australian Mercantile Land and
Finance Co.’s report; climate report and
forecast by courtesy of Govt. Meteorologist;
Producers’ Distributing Society’s fruit and
vegetable market report; grain arid fodder
report (“Solar”); dairy produce report
(“Solar”). 7.25 p.m.: Mr. Pirn and Miss Pam
in promoting talks and nonsense. 7.55 p.m.:
Programme and different announsements.
EVENING SESSION.
Announcer: Basil Kirke.
Accompanist: G. Vern Barnett.
Eight p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes. Madame
Adrienne Talbot, violinist.
8.7 p.m.: Cliff Gane, comic.
8.15 p.m.: Kathleen Nichols, soprano.
8.22 p.m.: David M’Kissock, ’cellist.
8.29 p.m.: Edith Cowley and lan Maxwell,
entertainers.
8.39 p.m.: Tom King, novelty pianist.
8.46 p.m.: Eileen Shettle, contralto—
(a) “A Heap of Rose Leaves” (Willeby).
(b) “Lilacs” (Cadman).
8.53 p.m.: Christopher Faulkner, cornetist.
9 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes; climate re-
port and forecast.
9.1 p.m.: A Sketch by Carrie Tennant.
9.11 p.m.: Amy Firth, mezzo.
9.18 p.m.: Madame Adrienne Talbot, violinist
9.25 p.m.: Cliff Gane, comic.
9.32 p.m.: Kathleen Nichols, soprano.
9.39 p.m.: David M’Kissock, ’cellist.
9.46 p.m.: Edith Cowley and lan Maxwell,
entertainers.
9.53 p.m.: Tom King, novelty pianist.
10 p.m.: G.P.O. clock and chimes.
Eileen Shettle, contralto.
(a) “Out on the Rocks” (Dolby).
(b) “Out of the Nightfall to You” (Lee).
10.7 p.m.: A Sketch by Carrie Tennant.
10.14 p.m.: Christopher Faulkner, cornetist.
10.21 p.m.: Amy Firth, mezzo.
10.28 p.m.: Resume of following day’s pro-
gramme.
10.30 p.m.: Nationwide Anthem; shut down.
2GB
10.Zero a.m.: Music. 10.10 a.m.: Happiness
speak, by A. E. Bennett. 10.20 a.m.: Music.
10.30 a.m.: Girls’s ‘session, by Helen J.
Beegling. 11.30 a.m.: Shut down. 2.0
p.m.: Music. 2.5 p.m.: Girls’s radio ser-
vice, by Mrs. Dorothy Jordan. 3.Zero p.m.:
Deal with, by G. H„ Chappel. 3.15 p.m.:
Shut down. 5.30 p.m.: Youngsters’s ses-
sion, by Uncle George; Radio Film Membership.
7.Zero p.m.: Inventory and market studies, by
New Zealand Mortgage and Mercantile Aency,
Ltd. 7.30 p.m.: Characteristic story: 8.Zero p.m.:
Violin solos, by Mr. Lionel Hargreaves.
8.10 p.m.: Songs. 8.20 p.m.: A humor-
ous interlude, by Mr. Jack Win and Mr.
Heath Burdock. 8.25 p.m.: Pianoforte
solos, by Miss Ada Brook. 10.10 p.m.: Or-
by Madame Bennett North. 8.45 p.m.:
Frank Lua and his metal guitar. 8.55 p.m.:
A humorous interlude. 9.Zero p.m.: Climate
report. 9.Three p.m.: Deal with. 9.15 p.m.:
Songs. 9.25 p.m.: Violin solos, by Mr.
Lionel Hargreaves. 9.35 p.m.: A humorous
interlude, by Mr. Jack Win and Mr. Heath
Burdock. 9.40 p.m.: Frank Lua and his
metal guitar. 9.50 p.m.: Songs, by Madame
Bennett North. 10.Zero p.m.: Pianoforte
solos, by Miss Ada Brook. 10.10 p.m.: Or-
chestral objects. 10.30 p.m.: Shut down.

P.53 – Producers Merchandise Advert[edit]

EMMCDs
RADIO
PRODUCTS
Golden Voice Trans-
former. Pure tone, not
loud noises 42/6
“A” Socket Energy
Provide.
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Puratone Transformer.
A brand new sort Audio
Transformer.
PRICE 15/6.
Emmco Tremendous Strate-
lyne Condenser. PRICE:
.0005 12/6. .00025 and
.00035 12/-.
Emmco De Luxe Ver-
nier Dial. Clockwise or
anti-clockwise.
PRICE 9/6.
Emmco Trickle Charger
PRICE £3/10/-,
Emmcostad. A univer-
sal variable resistor. All
resistances.
PRICE 7/6.
Maxum “B” Socket
Energy. An improved
B Eliminator.
PRICE £B/15/-.
Ernmco Battery Swap,
PRICE 2/6.
Emmco Vernier Dial,
Black or Mahogany*
PRICE 7/6. *
E m m c o Balanced
Socket. PRICE 3/6.
Sub-panel Socket.
PRICE 2/9.
Emmco Headphones,
PRICE 21/-.
9
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PRICE, S/6.
mum
Velmo Dial, Clockwise
or Anti-clockwise.
PRICE 6/-.
ALL EMMCO PRODUCTS ARE FULLY GUARANTEED
MADE BY ELECTRICITY METER MFG. CO., LTD.,
FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES
139 Clarence Si*. Sydney
TELE.’BW 1328
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Sugden Place off LifMe Collins Sf.
MELBOURNE

P.54 – Interstate Programmes, Thursday, January 17[edit]

Interstate Programmes, Thursday, January 17
3LO
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
7.15 a.m.: Morning melodies. 7.20 a.m.: Morning
workouts to music. 7.30 a.m.: Inventory studies. Mar-
ket studies. Basic information. Transport. Sporting in-
formation. 8.Zero a.m.: Melbourne Observatory time
sign. Specific prepare data. 8.1 a.m.: Morn-
ing melodies. 8.15 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. 11.Zero a.m.: 3LO’s’
totally different dainties for the every day dinner. To-day s
radio recipe, Peach amber tart. 11.5 a.m.: Sonora
recital. 11.25 a.m.: Matron Moreland will converse
on “Mothercraft.” 11.£Zero a.m.: Musical interlude.
11.45 a.m.: Mrs. Henrietta C. Walker will converse
on “The Artwork of Being a Settler: Emergencies.”
MIDDAY NEWS SESSION.
12.Zero midday: Melbourne Observatory time sign.
Specific prepare data. 12.1 p.m.: Costs re-
ceived by the Australian Mines and Metals Associa-
tion from the London: Inventory Alternate at the present time.
British official wi-fi information from Rugby. Reuter’s
and the Australian Press Affiliation cables. “Argus”
information service. 12.15 p.m.: Newmarket inventory gross sales.
Particular report by John M’Namara and Co. 12.20
pm.: Group singing, transmitted from the
Auditorium. Collins Avenue, Melbourne. Outdated-time
choruses, performed by Frank Hatherley. Colin Crane
(bass-baritone). Chosen. *l-45 p.m.: Inventory ex-
change data. Meteorological data.
Climate forecast for Victoria, Tasmania, New South
Wales, and South Australia. Ocean forecast. River
studies. Rainfall. 1.55 p.m.: Shut down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Announcer: Frank Hatherley. Accompaniste.
Agnes Fortune. 1.58 p.m.: Description of Break-
water Hurdle Race, 2m. 58yds., at Warrnambool
Races, by Eric Welch. 2.5 p.m.: The Strad Trio.
“Od 100 in E Flat” (Schubert). Andante con moto.
(Scherzo). 2.18 p.m.: Millie M’Cormack (mezzo-so-
prano). “Fairy Lullaby” (Quilter). “Lament of
Isis” (Bantock). 2.25 p.m.: Cecil Parkes (violin).
“Fugue in A Main” (Tartini). “Second Musicale
(Schubert). “Theme and Variations” (Tartini-
Kreisler). 2.38 p.m.: Description of Corinthian
Handicap, 6 furlongs, at Warrnambool Races. 2.45
p.m.: Bernard Manning (bass-barjtone). Autumn
Winds” (Korestchenko). “The Crown of the 12 months
(Martin). 2.52 p.m.: Could Broderick (piano).
“Ballade” (Brahms), “Waltz in A Flat (Brahms).
“Musical Field” (Lladoff). 3.Zero p.m.: Dt Loftus Hills.
“Matters of the Week.” 3,17 p.m.: Description of
B°ach Steeplechase, 2 miles Warrnambool Races.
3.24 p.m.: Wm. G. James wil Igive a chat to college students
of music illustrated with an appropriate gramophone re-
cital. 3.50 p.m.: The station orchestra. Le Re-
tour” (Bizet). “Romance” (Wieniawski). 3.58 p.m.:
Description of Lindsay Cup, 9% furlongs, at Wan-
nambool Races. 4.5 p.m.: The orchestra^
“Andante from Fifth Symphony (Beethoven) • 415
pm- Violet Jackson (soprano). The place Violets
Develop” ( Forster).. “Snowflakes” ( Cowan). 4.22
p.m.: The station orchestra. Overture, Track of
the Flame” (Stothart). 4.31 p.m.: Bernard Man-
ning (bass-baritone). “The Lute Participant” (Allitsen).
“The Windmill” (Nelson). 4.38 p.m.. Description
of Pony Race, furlongs, at Warrnambool Races.
4.45 p.m.: the Station orchestra. Voice of
Bells” (Thurban). Chosen. _ 4.55 p.m.: Information ses-
sion. Acceptances and barrier positions for the
V.A.T.C. Races at Caulfield, Saturday, January 19,
1929. 5.Eight p.m.: Description of the Ultimate Handicap,
5 furlongs, at Warrnambool Races. 5.15 p.m..
Shut down. EVENING SESSION.
Announcer- Frank Hatherley. 6.Zero p.m.: Solutions
to A letters and birthday greetings by “Bobby -Blue-
gum.” 6.25 p.m.: Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m..
“Bobby Bluegum” in track and story.
NIGHT SESSION.
Announcer: C. J. O’Connor. Accompaniste: Agnes
Fortune nC 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate data.
7.15 pm.: Market studies. 7.30 p.m.: Information session.
743 p.m.: Birthday greetings. 7.45 p.m.. Out of the
Previous ‘ 7.46 p.m.: Miss Could Collins, now showing
on the New P Comedy Theatre, will converse from her
arsw 7 “ i i
“Chloe” (Meret) “pecause My Child Don i Imply
Possibly Now” (Donaldson).. 8.24 p.m : Keith Des-
mond (elocutionist) will give a brief recital.
pm: The Radi-o-Aces. “Wabaly Stroll (Gioen).
“The Desert Track” (Romberg). ‘One Alone (Ro«i-
right here) 8.36 p.m.: E. Mason Wooden (baritone). Oft
to Philadelphia” (Haynes). 8.39 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces. “Alabama Stamp” (Creamer). Something
You Say” (Donaldson). “In a Bamboo Backyard
(Donaldson). 3.48 p.m,: Pat M’Lean (soubrette).
“Little one 8.51 p.m.. The Radi-o-
Aces. “Get Out and Get Below the Moon (Tobias).
“That’s My Weak spot Now” (Stept). Nebraska
(Sisk) 9.Zero p.m.: Millie M‘Cormack (mezzo-so-
prano). “Apple Blossom” (Colhoun). W P.m-
The Radi-o-Aces. “Ceaselessly Extra” (Burnett)-
of Yesterday” (Berlin). “It Goes Like This
(Caesar). 9.12 n.m.r Keith Desmond (elocutionist)
will give a brief recital. 9.15 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces. “Is It Gonna Be Lengthy?” (Whiting). “Simply
Maintain Singing a Track’ (SisselL. “Minnetonka”
(Wallace). 9.24 p.m.: Pat. M’Lean (soubrette).
“Little one Tmpersonations.” 9.27 p.m.: The Radi-o-
Aces. “The Dance of the Blue Danube” (Fisher).
“Stunning” (Gillespie). “Constantinople” (Carl-
ton). 9.36 p.m.: E. Mason Wooden (baritone).
“Stonecracker John” (Coates). 9.39 p.m.: The
Radi-o-Aces. “Gotta Huge Date with a Little Woman”
(Tobias). “Dream Home” (Fox). “My Black-
birds are Bluebirds Now” (Good friend). 9.48’ p.m.:
Millie M’Cormack (mezzo-soprano). “The Black-
hen’s Track” (Scott). 9.51 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
“Rain” (Ruby). “Oh, Ya, Ya” (Frich). ‘‘There
Should be a Regulation Towards That” (Good friend). 10.0
p.m.: “Argus” information service. British official wi-fi
information from Rugby. Meteorological data. An-
nouncements. 10.15 p.m.: On with the Dance! The
Radi-o-Aces. “Sizzling Ivories” (Sinastra). ‘ Chiquita
(Wayne). “Simply Like a Melody Out of the Sky”
(Donaldson). 10.24 p.m.: -Keith Desmond (elocu-
tionist) will give a brief recital. 10.27 p.m.: The
Radi-o-Aces. “You Are Fantastic” (Ash). “Even-
ing Star” (Turk). “Afraid” (Barnie). 10.36 p.m.:
Millie M’Cormack (mezzo-soprano). “Could Day
at Islington” (Oliver). 10.39 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
“Paradise” (Zamicnek). “Cinnamon Cake” (Ber-
nard). “Beside a Lazy Stream” (Stept). 10-48
p.m.: E. Mason Wooden (baritone). “Kitty” (Flet-
cher). 10.51 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces. “Dusky Ste-
vedore” (Razalf), “You’re a Actual Sweetheart’
(Good friend). “It Don’t Do Nothin’ However Rain” (Cook dinner).
11.Zero p.m.: Our Nice Thought for to-day is: “Allow us to
benefit from the fugitive hour. Man has no harbor; time
has no shore; it rushes on, and carries us with
it.”—(Lamartine). 11.1 p.m.: The Radi-o-Aces.
“How Lengthy has This Been Going On?” (Welding).
“Whv Can’t You Care?” (Gilbert). “Excessive Up on .
a- Hilltop” (Baer). “Do, You?” (Piantadosi). My
Inspiration is You” (Nichols). . “Dawning (Sil-
ver). “Prepared for the River” (Meret). “Good-night
Waltz” (Bibo). “Good-night Track.” 11.40 p.m.:
God Save the King.
3AR
Announcer: Frank Hatherley, 10.Zero a.m.: Q.P.O.
clock says “Ten.” 10.1 am.: “Age” Inventory Ex-
change studies. London steel market. _ 10.10 a.m..
“Age” market studies. Farm and station produce,
fruit, fish, greens, and many others. 10.25 a.m.: “Age’ ship-
ping studies. Ocean forecast. 10.30 a.m.: Mail
notices. Specific prepare data. 10.35 a.m.:
“Age” information service, unique to 3AR. 10.59 a.m.:
Climate forecast.
MORNING MUSICAL SESSION.
11 Zero a.m.: Melodious measures on the studio sera-
phina. 12.Zero midday: Captain Donald M’Lean. “How
Many Perils Doe (He) Enfold.” (Spenser). 12.15 p.m.:
Melodious measures continued. 12.30 p.m.: British
official wi-fi information. Bulletins. 12.50 p.m.:
Melodious measures continued. 1.30 p.m.: Shut
down.
NIGHT SESSION.
Announcer: C. M. Hosking. 8.Zero p.m.: Below the
auspices of the Nurserymen and Seedsmen’s As-
sociation of Victoria, W. R. Warner wil converse on
“Winter Flowers.” 8.15 p.m.: E. A. Gollan, direc-
tor of the Y.M.C.A. Canoe Membership, affiliated with the
Victorian Canoe Affiliation, will converse on “Canoe
Racing.” 8.30 p.m.: The station orchestra. Over-
ture, “Merry Wives of Windsor” (Nicolai). 8.37
pm.: Violet Jackson (soprano). “Lackaday
(Crompton). “In An Old style City” (Squire).
8.44 p.m.: The station orchestra. Suite, “La Deaux
Pigeons” (Messanger). 9.53 p.m.: Bernard Man-
ning (bass-baritone). “Roses Pink within the Backyard’
(Ronald). “The Season” (Ronald). 9.Zero p.m.: The
O Kay’s. Director, George English. Refrain, ‘Funi-
culi Funicule,” Refrain. Veronica Cox, “April
Morn.” Ted Jones, “Yeoman’s Marriage ceremony Track.
Refrain, “Comrades in Arms,” Refrain. Roy Until.
“Sympathy.” Sextette, “Lucia di Lammermoor,
Veronica Cox, Josie Muller, George English, George
Bryqr, J. Stewart, and Ted Jones. Quartette, O!
Kay’ Quartette, “Outdated Man Moses.” Ted Jones,
“Mountains of Mourne.” Quartette, O! Kay Quar-
tette, “A Nation Courtship. Veronica. Cox, A
Coronary heart that’s Free.” Refrain, Negro religious, I
Bought Sneakers.” Duet, tenor and baritone George
English and Jack Stewart, “Negro Melodies.
Refrain 9,35 p.m.: The station* orchestra. Selec-
tion, “The Pupil Prince” (Romberg) 9.45 pan.:
Violet Jackson (soprano). “The Lass with the Deli-
cate Air” (Arne). “Love is Meant to Make Us
Glad” (German). 9.52 p.m.: The station orchestra.
Choice, “Romeo and Juliet” (Gounod). 10.7 p.m.:
Bernard Manning (bass-baritone). ‘The Yokel
(Wilson). “The Admiral’s Yarn” (Rubens). 10.14
p m.: The station orchestra. “Jap Romance
(Korsakoff). 10.20 p.m.: “Age” information service, ex-
clusive to 3AR. Bulletins. 10.30 p.m.: Goa
Save the King.
4QG
EARLY MORNING SESSION.
a.m.: Time indicators. 7.45 a.m.: Information service.
8.Zero a.m.: Some electrical information. 8.15 a.m.: Information
service. 8.30 a.m.: Shut down.
MORNING SESSION.

1.Zero a.m.: Music. 11.5 a.m.: Social information. 11.15

a rn : Lecturette, a gardening speak, by “Tecoma.”
11.30 a.m.: Music. 11.35 a.m.: Extra social information.
11.45 a m.: Wurlitzer organ. 12.0 (midday): Shut down
MIDDAY SESSION.
1.Zero pm.: Market studies and climate data.
1.15 p.m.: A lunch-hour deal with. 2.Zero pm.: Shut
down.
AFTERNOON SESSION. ,
3.Zero p.m.: Orchestral music by the Tivoli Operatic
Orchestra, beneath the baton of Mr. C. Groves. 3.30
p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; a programme of
electrically-reproduced information. 4.Zero p.m.: Orchestral
music. 4.15 p.m.: Afternoon information. 4.30 p.m.: Shut
down.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.Zero p.m.: Mail prepare operating instances; mail informa-
tion; , transport information. 6.5 p.m.: Dinner music. 6.25
p.m,: Industrial bulletins. 6.30 p.m.: Mattress-
time tales, performed by “The Sandman.” 7.Zero p.m.:
Information briefly. 7.5 p.m.: Inventory Alternate information. 7.6
p.m.’ Metallic quotations. 7.7 p.m:. Market studies.
7.25 p.m.: Fenwick’s inventory report. 7.30 p.m.: Climate
data. 7.40 p.m.: Bulletins. 7.43 p.m.:
Commonplace time indicators. 7.45 p.m.: Lecturette, poultry
speak, by Mr. P. Rumball (poultry teacher).
NIGHT SESSION.
A programme of Scottish music. 8.Zero p.m.: From
the studio, Pipe-Main M’Corkindale, bagpipe selec-
tions. 8.10 p.m.: Agnes Kerr (contralto), “John
Anderson My Jo.” 8.15 p.m.: The Studio Instru-
psychological Quartette (conductor, Fred C. Smith) —Excessive-
land patrol, “Wee M – Gregor.” 8.22 p.m.: A. N. Falk
(baritone), “Jock o’ Hezeldean.” 8.26 p.m.: H. Scott
MaeCallum (violinist), Scottish fantasia, “Culloden”
(M’Kenzie Murdoch). 8.34 p.m.: Half-song by 4QG
artists, “Blua, Bells of Scotland.” 8.40 p.m.: Could
King (contralto), “Robin Adair.” 8.45 p.m.: The
Studio Instrumental Quartette —one-step, “She’s Ma
Daisy.” 8.49 p.m.: Stanley Tamblyn (bass), “The
Laird o’ Cockpen.” 8.53 p.m.: Nance King (soprano),
“Jessie’s Dream.” 8.55 p.m.: Agnes Kerr and Stan-
ley Tamblyn, vocal duet, “Huntingtower.” 9.Zero p.m.:
Metri politan climate forecast. 9.1 p.m.: Pipe-Main
MCoikindale, bagpipe choices. 9.10 p.m.: D.
Ritchie, Scottish entertainer. 9.20 p.m.: Agnes Kerr
(contralto), “Cornin’ Via the Rye.” 9.25 p.m.: The
Studio Instrumental Quartette—“l Love a Lassie”
(Lauder), 9.30 p.m.: Wilfred Spargo (tenor), “Afton
Waier,” “Bonnie Mary of Argyle.” 9.38 p.m.: Wini-
fred Haslam (contralto), “Annie Laurie.” 9.43 p.m.:
The Studio Instrumental Quartette —“Scottish
Patrol.” 9.50 p.m.: Stanley Tamblyn (bass), “March
of tne Cameron Males.” 9.55 p.m.: Winifred Haslam
v contralto), “Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond.” 9.58
p.m.: The Studio Instrumental Quartette—“Savoy
Scottish Medley.” 10.Zero p.m.: The “Every day Mail” information,
the “Courier” information, climate information. Shut down.
7ZL
MIDDAY SESSION.
11.30 a.m.: Choices. 11.34 a.m.: Particular Mid-
lands climate forecast. 11.35 a.m.: Choices, 1i.55
a.m.: Tasmanian station’s 9 a.m. climate report.
12.Zero midday: G.P.O, clock chimes the hour. 12.1 p.m.:
Transport data. Ships inside wi-fi vary.
Mail notices. Housewives’ information. 12.Eight p.m.: Selec-
tions. 12.11 n.m.: British Official Wi-fi information.
12.20 p.m.: Choices. 12.29 p.m.: Bulletins.
12.33 p.m.: Choices. 12.55 p.m.: “Mercury” information,
service. 1.10 p.m.: Choices. 1.30 p.m.: Shut
down. 2.Zero n.m.: Working description of Breakwater
Hurdle Race, 2in. 58yds.. run at Warrnambool
Racecourse. Warrnambool. Victoria. 2.5 p.m.: Shut
down. 2,40 n.m.: Working description of Corin-
thian Handicap. 6 furlongs, run at Warrnambool
Racecourse, Warrnambool, Victoria. 2.45 p.m.: Shut
down.
AFTERNOON SESSION.
3.Zero D.m.: G-P-O. clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.:
Choices. 3.Four n.m..: Climate data. 3.5
n.m – Choices 3.20 p.m: Working description of
Seaside Steeplechase, 2 miles, run at Warrnambool
Racecourse, Warrnambool, Victoria. 3.25 p.m.: Selec-
tions. 4.Zero n.m.: Working description of Lindsay
Cup, 9% furlongs, run at Warrnambool Racecourse, 1
Warrnambool, Victoria. 4.5 p.m.: Choices. 4.40
n.m.: Working description of Pony Race, 4V 2 fur-
longs, run at Warrnambool Racecourse, Warrnam-
bool. Victoria. 4.45 n.m.: Choices. 5.10 n.m.:
Working description of Trial Handicap, 5 furlongs,
run at Warrnambool Racecourse, Warrnambool. Vic-
toria. 5.15 p.m.: Shut down. 6.10 p.m.: Outcomes of
the Warrnambool Races.
EARLY EVENING SESSION.
6.15 n.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters. 6.30
n.m.: Mollie Corridor will recite to the wee people. 6.45
n.m.: Choices by the Melody Masters. 7.Zero n.m.:
Solutions to letters and birthday greetings by “Uncle
David.” 7.5 p.m.: Request numbers for the child-
Ven. 7.15 p.m.: Information session.
EVENING SESSION.
7.30 p.m.: Gus Froelech, ex-European champion
swimmer and world’s document breaker, explains how
a toddler of 5 years of age could be taught to swim.
7.45 p.m.: J. M. Counsel will converse on “Outdated Iden-
tities: Choose Giblin.” 8.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes
the hour. 8.6 p.m.: A studio live performance by 7ZL ar-
tists and the Discus Ensemble. Raymond John-
son (baritone). “Love’s Coronation” (Aylward).
“The Outdated Highway” (Scott). 8.13 p.m.: Kettelbey’s
live performance orchestra. “In a Persian Market,” narts
1 and a couple of (Kettelbey). 8.20 p.m.: Doreen Ellison
(sonrano). “Danny Boy” (Weatherley). “By the
Waters of Minnetonka” (Lieurance). 8.27 p.m.:
Hawaiian guitar duet. “Aloha Land.” “Wasbash
Blues.’” 8.34 p.m.: ’Cello solo bv W. H. Squire.
“Melodie” (Squire). “Andante Religiose” (Thome).
n. 41 p.m.: Rene Dyer (soprano). “The Rosary”
(Nevin). “Birds Go North Once more” (Willeby). 8.48
n.m.: Wilfred Kemp (violin solo). “Serenata” (To-
seli). 8.53 p.m.: Doreen Ellison (sonrano).
“Spring” (Henschel). “Butterfly Wings” (Phillips).
9.Zero p.m.: Basic Symphony Orchestra. “Stradella.”
components 1 and a couple of (Flouton). 9.7 p.m.: Jack Broad-
bent (baritone). Chosen. 9.14 p.m.: Wilfred Kemp
(violin solo). “On the Wings of Track” (Mendels-
sohn). “Meditation” (Gounod). 9.21 p.m.: Rene
Dyer (soprano). “Aeolo Cradle Track” (Clutson).
“My Pricey Soul” (Byron). 9.28 p.m.: New Queen’s
Corridor mild orchestra. “Peer Cvnt Suite,” No. 2. 9.35
p.m.: Ray Johnson (baritone). “My Prayer”
(Squire). “King Charles” (White). 9.42 p.m.:,
Eddie Thomas’ Collegians. “The Missouri” (Logan).
“Until We Meet Once more’” (Whiting). 9.50 p.m.: Information
session. 10.Zero p.m.: G.P.O. clock chimes the, hour,
10.2 p.m.: God Save the King. Shut down.

P.55 – Wi-fi Weekly Radio Data Service[edit]

The WIRELESS WEEKLY
RADIO INFORMATION
foervice
Below the path of
Ray Allsop
and
Don B. Knock
(Affiliate Technical Editors)
Correspondence Answered
solely by
these
Columns
(See Coupon Beneath)
AjR. (Allawah).—“i’ve constructed the crystal set de-
-7/l2b/28 l anrt ie n lnformatlon Service > ‘Wi-fi Weekly,’
7/12/28, and the receiver won’t work. The aerial
could be very low, being joined to the guttering of my
home, and tom four-foot pole on my fence. The
earth is about 12 ft lengthy, and is in a peach tin
mv sett 1 * P an you inform me how 1 shall repair
lftV set. Diagram of wiring is enclosed.”
1 spent an gratifying 5 minutes studying
youl letter by many times! Contemplating
your locality, it’s fairly a marvel the little crystal
set. didn’t turn out to be abusive when hooked up to such
au aerial—earth system! The aerial needs to be at
hl aS iVt°J, ee i ? lg £r tor your locality—and will NOT
be hooked up to the guttering of your own home, as you
aie then earthing it, and rendering the receiver worse
than ineffective. It could have a greater probability have been
you to make use of no aerial or earth in any respect. As for a bit
of wire caught in a tiny peach tin (stuffed with water)
ls completely of no use whatso-
‘ ■ your earth wire to a Water faucet—or, if
tins is . not obtainable, bury a kerosene tin, with the
earth wire soldered to it—about three ft in moist
earth.
C.G.L. (Goulburn).—“l have a Mingay suner-five
utilizing Philips’ A 409 valves. Since altering
my aenal to a six wire hoop sort I want to
know if I ought to use larger effectivity valves. Dur-
ing daytime reception is evident, however at evening it varies ”
Reply: Circumstances are none too favorable at pre-
despatched, and. Goulourn is outwardly not one of the best place
foi ladio reception. The reason of fine re-
ception throughout daytime, however dangerous reception at evening
could also be accounted for by the truth that a physician/ or
another person residing close to you,, begins up {an electrical}
machine. This could have the impact of which you
complain. Your different letter additionally answered in these
columns.
A.F.J. (Eumengerie).—“l have a Schnell short-wave
aaapter, which appears to be out of order. After I nlusr
the speaker into my broadcast set, all I can hear
is a whistle, which nonetheless continues when the speaker
is taken off. If I place my finger on one of many
transformer terminals this whistle vanishes.”
Reply: Place a .002 mounted condenser throughout the
secondary of the transformer, and an R.F, choke
in collection with the detector plate lead.
W.H.C. (Channon). “Are you able to inform me the best way to re-
juvenate my B (dry) battery?”
Reply: Take away the decrease insulation and pierce
every zinc cell. Soak the block in sal-ammoniac for
twenty-four hours, then seal up the bottoms once more.
Mr. W. H. Clarke, of Turntable Creek. Channon
by way of Lismore, N.S.W., writes:—“l have readily available ail
of J Wi-fi Weekly’ courting again to June 18
1926. and will likely be glad to produce readers with again
numbers, in the event that they write to the above deal with and en-
shut postage.”
Reply: Thanks, Mr. Clarke. I concern you’ll be
stored busy!
“Reinartz” (Lismore).—“l am the proprietor of a three-
valve Reinartz receiver, and want to know if
there’s any benefit in utilizing heavy sort ‘B’ bat-
teries. If that’s the case, what voltage ought to I take advantage of for 201 A
valves? Would it not be advisable to make use of a rheostat on
the ‘B’ voltage? What number of ohms? Ought to the rheo-
stat be positioned within the ‘B’ unfavorable or ‘B’ optimistic
lead?
Reply: Sure, there is a bonus in utilizing the
heavy responsibility batteries. The amperage is bigger, and
your batteries will subsequently give longer srvice Use
thi:ee of the 42 or 45 volt sort in collection. There isn’t any
benefit gained through the use of a variable resistance in
the ‘B’ plus lead besides to manage the voltage. Use
one in every of 0-100,000 ohms, should you want to check out the
Thought. Place the resistance within the optimistic lead.
C.G.L. (Goulburn).—“l have a super-five valve re-
ceiver, utilizing valves as per hooked up checklist. Since al-
tering my aerial to a six-wire sort I want to
know whether it is obligatory for me to make use of larger effi-
ciency valves.”
Reply: No; it won’t be obligatory to make use of differ-
ent valves. Nonetheless, you would enhance in your pre-
vious choice through the use of two A 409 Philips’ valves
lor the radio frequency levels—an A 415 for the de-
tector, and A 406 for the primary audio, and an A 409 for
the final audio stage. The truth that reception varies
it evening could also be as a result of some native disturbance. Strive
an underground aerial,
L.Okay. (Poaktawe).-—(1) “I’ve an eight-valve
superheterodyne of my very own design, which works ex-
cellently from a loop. In daytime, nevertheless, reception
is marred by a dashing sound. What’s the trigger
of this, and the way might it’s eradicated or minimised?”
Reply: Evidently some native disturbance. A
slight hum could also be heard with the transmission, and
is brought on by the facility alternators. Strive the use
Of an underground aerial, if this doesn’t re-
duce the interference satisfactorily, construct the inter-
ference eliminator, circuit of which appeared in final
subject.
(2) “What’s the appropriate worth of the variable
resistance to shunt throughout the response coil as a re-
era management?”
Reply: The resistance needs to be one in every of 0-500,000
ohms.
C.A.R. (Woollahra). —(1) “I’d be enormously ob-
liged should you might inform me one of the best R.F, valve to make use of
in my Selectrex 4, which was printed in your
paper December, 1927. I’m utilizing a six-volt ac-
cumulator. I’m at current utilizing an A 630, which
doesn’t give me the outcomes I want.”
Reply: Use an A 635.
(2) “Has there come to mild’any circuit (utilizing
4 valves), which might give me higher outcomes?”
Reply: Construct the Marco 4. The circuit ap-
peared in final subject, within the queries columns. A
modernised model of this receiver will shortly be
printed.
R.S. (Double Bay).—“l am considering constructing
the one management Marco 4, which appeared in
‘W.W.’ February 3, 1928. Within the article you specify
No. 26 gauge wire. Can 24-gauge be used? If that’s the case,
please state the proper variety of turns for the
aerial, r.f. coil (grid), r.f. coil (main), detector
grid coil, and response coil.”
Reply: Sure, you should use this gauge wire. For
the aerial cOil Wind on 14 turns, r.f. grid coil 45
turns, r.f. main 23 turns, detector grid coil 45
turns, response coil 19 turns. You enclosed a stamped
envelope, however we don’t reply by publish. Please en-
shut coupon subsequent time, or your queries might not be
answered.
J.H. (Wallsend).—“Over the last, three or 4
weeks my reception at evening has been removed from satis-
manufacturing facility. Daylight reception is ideal, however as quickly
as evening approaches a dashing sound begins. Some
nights it’s that robust that it’s not possible to pay attention.
My aerial is at proper angles to the electrical energy
mains.” «
Reply: That is both as a result of native interference or
to a leakage from an influence transformer within the close to
neighborhood. You must ask the native council to have
the matter seemed into. See if different listeners in
your neighborhood are troubled with the identical noise. If
so, use an underground aerial, or construct the inter-
ference eliminator which appeared in these columns
final subject..
R.J.Okay. (Duntroon).—“ls the seven-valve super-
heterodyne successful together with a ‘B’ socket
energy unit on the printed band?”
Reply: I suppose you confer with the printed re-
ceiver? Sure, it might be used with good outcomes. If
you confer with the S.W. superheterodyne. I’d not
advise the usage of an eliminator for both B.C. oi
S.W. work.
(2, “Which Can be one of the best eliminator —a Philips’
No. 3002 or an Efflmco ‘Maxum’?”
Reply: We can not, for apparent causes, talk about the
deserves and in any other case of our advertisers’ merchandise.
Your greatest plan can be to lookup the literature
issued by the respective corporations, and make your individual
comparisons.
(3) “Would any alteration be obligatory in my re-
ceiver (which is battery-operated) in an effort to use an
eliminator?”
Reply: No, although you would use an influence valve
within the audio stage, with improved outcomes.
A.G. (Granville).—“About 4 weeks in the past I blew
three valves m my Reinartz Three. I scrapped these
valves after being examined by a vendor, however after a
spell of three weeks the 415 and the 309 (Philips’) re-
sumed responsibility, and are carrying on nearly as good as ever.
The 406 nonetheless’ refused responsibility. I transformed the three-
vaiver right into a Marco 4, and picture my shock
when placing the valves into their sockets once I
discovered that the 406 valve, positioned within the R.F. socket,
lit up brightly. Surprisingly sufficient (to me), it is going to
not mild in any of the opposite sockets, though the
different valves are doing their bit in these sockets. I
might point out additionally that the ‘B’ and ‘C’ batteries
weren’t related on the time; additionally the valve in
query won’t mild when making direct con-
tact to the ‘A* or ‘C’ battery leads. I’ve not been
capable of take a look at this valve to see if it is going to work within the
set. As I discussed to you in a letter final week—
my ‘B’ battery died younger, and I canpot see my
means clear (after shopping for the household toyfc and the
raspberry vinegar for the festive season) to get an-
different earlier than Pancake Day. I’ll take this oppor-
tunity of expressing my appreciation of the brand new
‘Wi-fi Weekly.’ The ‘Proving Radio’ web page is what
a whole bunch of us (mugs) have been ready for. I
know I’ve tried onerous to get some grasp of the
basic ideas of radio, however I felt like a
five-year-old child being despatched to highschool for the primary
time and dumped straight into the fourth class
with out figuring out my A.B.C. I’ve already per-
suaded 4 others to comply with up the articles, afld
will persuade many extra, as I’m transferring about
amongst a thousand males on the Loco. Dept., and it mav
be information so that you can know that there’s not one man
among the many a whole bunch that I come into contact with
that know something about wi-fi, and the joke of it
is, they’ve it into their heads that I’m a Wire-
much less skilled, and I hardly know a gridleak from a
transformer. There are dozens of the chaps who
would construct units however for the truth that they can’t
perceive the articles or books at current on the
market. They received’t purchase a receiver both, as a result of
they reckon it’s like shopping for a pig in a bag—you
see, you don’t know what they’re placing throughout. So
I’m positive ‘Proving ROdio’ goes to start out a variety of
them on the job. I don’t know if you should have the
time or inclination to learn by this, however it.
doesn’t matter, anyhow, I’m wanting ahead to the
Marco Pour to seem in ‘Wi-fi Weekly.’ In the event you
have gotten this far will you please inform me if the coils
specified within the Marco 4 of ‘W.W.’ Nov. 4, 1927,
will work satisfactorily with Philips’ Valves? The
article states that the R.F. coil was specifically, de-
signed for a UX2OIA valve.”
Reply: The valves have been “paralysed” within the first
Occasion, and weren’t truly blown out. A blown-
out valve has a damaged filament, and the valve then
turns into ineffective. I actually have usually by accident
precipitated the “B” present to move by the filaments
of valves, however have fojund that most often, after
one or two weeks, the valve is simply nearly as good as ever
it was. In a means, this is identical remedy as
rejuvenation, however it takes longer to recuperate from
the unintended remedy as a result of the voltage used ac-
cidentally is greater than can be ordinarily used.
Additional, this voltage (referred to as the “flashing voltage)
needs to be adopted by smaller energy (referred to as the
“ageing” voltage;. Many valves by accident shorted
with the “B” battery could be rapidly recuperated by
disconnecting the ‘B’ battery and leaving the fila-
ments lighted for about an hour. The valve men-
tioned shouldn’t mild (visibly). I’m afraid I
can not clarify the phenomenon. It may need been
doable should you had had the “C” battery related.
Strive “ageing” the valve in query by giving it the
remedy outlined above. Take a look at the filament con-
nections of the R.F. stage valve. Glad you just like the
“Proving Radio” collection. The circuit of the Marco
4 appeared in these columns final is-
sue. The modernised Marco 4 will ap-
pear shortly. The boil L 2 was designed
specifically for the 201 A valve, and it might be neces-
sary (when utilizing four-volt valves) to wind this cail
with 50 turns of 32-gauge D.C.C. wire. The coil iS
not essential if consideration is paid to coupling.
E.G.F. (Leichhardt).—-“I’ve a quantity Of
‘Wi-fi Weekly’s’, which I’ll publish to any deal with
on receipt of postage for similar.
Reply: Thanks, Mr. Ferguson. These wishing to
get in contact with Mr. Ferguson will discover him at 41
South Avenue, Leichhardt.
J.L.S. (Chatswood).—-“I want to construct the
Peridyne, however the coils will likely be fairly costly.
The place can I get hold of specs of those coils?”
Reply: Write to Metropolitan Electrical Co., who
have full specs, and who additionally market
particular kits for individuals who want to wind their very own
/
QUERY COUPON
If you’re in difficulties about re
ception or set-construction, allow us to
knew, and we’ll endeavor to
set, you proper. Make your ques-
tions temporary to the purpose, and,
the place doable, present lay-out
and wiring design. Below
no circumstances will
solutions to queries be
made by letter or by
phone. All an
swers will seem
within the columns
Of this depart-
ment within the
order in
which they
are r
cetved. -y. % y-., ->■ v, . .
. vA A n
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Peridyne coil kits. – Re your request—the one de-
scription given of the coils appeared with Mr. Hugo
Oernsbapk’s unique article in “American Radio
Information.”
R.J.M. (Uralla). — (1) “I’ve a great Peridyne
receiver inbuilt Could final, and fitted with Advert-
vance Pantagraph. I’ve fitted two Philips’ A-442
valves with by-pass condensers, chokes, and many others., however
as a substitute of an enchancment, it isn’t nearly as good. Is
this technique passable, or ought to 442’s be
shielded? That is the primary failure I’ve had with
screen-grid valves.
Reply; You don’t ahead a circuit, there-
fore it’s onerous for us to say whether or not you’ve got
made an error on this path. It could be ad-
visable to protect the 442’5.
(2) “The pantagraph solely extends to 2FC. Will
a .0001 condenser fitted to aerial condenser elevate
the wave-length to 3AR or 7ZL?”
Reply: No. A collection condenser within the aerial
lowers the wave-length. Add a number of. turns to the
secondary coil within the detector stage—strive 4 or
5 turns.
(3) “I’ve tried the Philips’ 443 on all volt-
ages from 50 to 130 volts, however discover it no higher
than any energy valve. Do you assume the valve is
defective?”
Reply: No; I believe your bother is grid-bias.
You will discover the proper bias is within the neighborhood
of twelve volts. The bias voltage for this valve is
essential to the volt.
R.F.A. (Ballimore), —“Gould you please inform me
if it might be doable to bury a Rotary Conver-
ter about three ft within the floor? Would this
cease the wi-fi set selecting it up? The conver-
ter belongs to the Brunswick Panotrope. ’
Reply: Sure; do that. It should assist. Aiso use
a counterpoise as a substitute of an earth connection.
Make sure that the converter is shielded pro-
perly from grime and moisture earlier than you bury it.
G. (Grafton).—“ln the 1928 Solodyne circuit
printed iri “Radio and Wi-fi Weekly,” the
display grid valves given for the radio levels are
of the horizontal sort and are positioned by
holes reduce within the screens. Would it not be doable to
use valves of the vertical sort—similar to Philips’
or Radiotron (display grid valves)- —-instead? If that’s the case,
what alterations will likely be. obligatory within the structure
and screening?”
Reply: Your suggestion is sort of so as.
Recommend the Philips’ A 442 S.G. valve, which can
be mounted in the identical means. I don’t advise the
use of the UX222 valves on this circuit.
T.W. (Rose Bay).—“Can a valve be mended when,
after a pointy knock, the plate has been moved
from its appropriate place, leaving a few quarter
of an inch of the grid aspect displaying? Nqne of
the weather are .touching, and the valve nonetheless op-
erates, though nothing like as effectively as orl-
gi Reply: No. The one probability you’ve got of re-
pairing the, valve is to knock the aspect again
once more. Your greatest plan can be to disconnect the
C battery out of your set, mild up the filament,
and place a excessive plate voltage on the valve, when
it is going to turn out to be scorching, and you should have a greater
probability of transferring the aspect with out breaking
it It won’t, regardless of this technique, be a simple
job, however it’s price attempting, anyhow.
M.P. (Sydney).—“My husband and I would really like
to know all particulars about an underground
aerial talked about in “W.W.” a number of weeks in the past.
The place can this aerial be obtained? I’m enclosing
diagram of our set. Is it 0.Okay.? Since putting in
an eliminator I’ve failed to tug in inter-State
stations. Beforehand all stations had been obtained
at full Speaker energy. I want to place response
on this set. What technique would you advise, as
the response on the Circloid equipment is immovable.
Reply: So far as I’m conscious, it isn’t pos-
sible to purchase an underground aerial. It’s a easy
affair to repair it your self, nevertheless. Use Electron
wire, and place it in a size of conduit equal to
the size of the aerial. Seal up the ends. Bury
the pipe about three ft deep. The top of the
pipe giving outlet to the lead-in wire, needs to be
turned in order that it simply comes above the extent of
the earth. If this isn’t achieved, the protecting spherical
the electron wire will rot away, and shielding
precautions will likely be wasted, because the aerial will likely be
earthed. Maybe the rectifier in your eliminator
is defective. Have it examined by your vendor. Most
customers of an eliminator make the error of over-
loading their detector valves. Use no more than
about 45 volts on the R.F. levels, and 30 volts on
the detector. For Reinartz Response, wind a coil
about three inches in diameter consisting of 30
turns of 30 gauge D.S.C., and place this contained in the
Circloid coil within the detector stage. The circuit
will likely be printed in subsequent subject. Tuning is man-
aged via a .00025 variable condenser.
A.F.Okay. (Willoughby).—“Will you please inform me
how I can add response to my receiver?”
Reply: See reply to M.P. (Sydney) above,
Strain of house doesn’t enable for diagrams
this subject. Watch these columns subsequent week.
J.B.G. (Leichhardt). —“Just lately I offered my set,
and determined to banish radio from the home, however
discover that I can not give it up, so fascinating has it
turn out to be to me. Subsequently I want to ask you to spare
invaluable house in your Radio Data Service
to print a two-valve circuit utilizing crystal as a de-
tector. I’ve a Harley crystal detector, and
want to use it.”
Reply: The circuit will seem subsequent subject
Different readers may also have an interest on this cir-
cuit. as outcomes are extraordinarily clear and volumin-
ous. Full particulars will seem with the circuit, however
if any are doubtful, I shall be happy to advise.
H. (Gordon).—“l not too long ago constructed a crystal set
(circuit enclosed). Often I obtain 2FC on the
tapping at 50 turns, however whereas I used to be listening in
this morning, the music died out, and I couldn’t
decide it up once more till , I modified the tapping to
75 turns, and it got here on higher than ever earlier than.”
Reply: The crystal adjustment will need to have al-
tered, thereby altering the resistance. Take away
your crystal from its cup via a pair of
tweezers, and gently scrape the floor to take away
the uninteresting spots.
C.H. (Albury).—“Have you ever any concept when the
Cossor Quintode valve will likely be obtainable in Aus-
tralia?”
Reply: The brokers advise us that they’ve
been anticipating a consignment for • a while, however to
date they’ve obtained no phrase from London.
They may tell us when these valves are re-
ceived, nevertheless, and we will be happy to ad-
vise you thru these columns.
S.T.G. (Queensland).—“l want to thanks re
the lacking copy which you kindly appealed for
througn your paper. There was fairly an unex-
pected response. Updated I’ve obtained over
fifty replies and copies, from Adelaide to No run
Queensland, and most often I replied person-
ally. Nonetheless, owing to some benefactors not
sending a letter or deal with I’ve a number of strays,
and I ought to wish to thank these senders by
your columns. One gentleman stated his daughter
was amassing for the hospital, so I stored that
copy and returned the others. Will you please
publish the next little letter of thanks:—
‘S. T. Grice, No. 12 Prospect Terrace, Sth. Brisbane,
Qld., needs to thank all who responded to his
S.O.S. foi a duplicate of “W.W.” Fifty replies got here
handy, and they’re nonetheless rolling up. I stored
one, and reposted all these for which I had names
and addresses. I now have copies (inclusive) since
September 11. 1925 (Vol. 6.. No. 20). Anybody hav-
ing the whole points earlier to that (from the
first subject) wishing to promote, please talk,
stating value.’ ”
Reply: I’m happy to listen to that your re-
quirements have been met, Mr. Grice. Different readers
who’ve requested us to request copies have had a
related expertise to yours.
BRIEF REPLIES
S.J.R. (Jervis Bay).—Don’t advise you’ to alter
the kind valves equipped together with your receiver, which
is of fine, make. The difficulty could also be occasioned
by the A battery. Accumulators give good service
for about 18 months, as do valves, when
it’s advisable to make a change. Persist with the
similar sort, nevertheless.
L.W.G. (Lakemba). —A one-valve Reinartz recei-
ver appeared in these columns on the 28th Decem-
ber, 1928.
P.S. (Glebe Level). —Mr. L.W.G., of Sproule St.,
Lakemba, is asking for a duplicate of the circuit of
your one-valve receiver. Are you able to oblige, please?
A diagram displaying ho w the
screen-grid valve operates. Pub-
lished on the request of a num-
ber of readers.
J.M.S. (Dorrigo).—The transformers talked about
will likely be fairly O.Okay. with these valves. MTe don’t
reply by publish. You took a threat, you understand, enclosing
the circuit you worth a lot, when now we have re-
peatedly talked about that no queries are answered by
publish. On this occasion, nevertheless, we will return
the circuit by publish. Subsequent time, please, ship a duplicate.
Different readers please be aware.
P.R.E. (5 Dock) writes.- —“Will you please pub-
lish a request for ‘Radio,’ October, 1927; additionally
‘Wi-fi Weekly,’ containing the Marco Pour?” The
deal with is Mr. P. R. Evans, 54 Wareemba Avenue,
5 Dock.
A.L.L.T. (Moore Park). —Your request was an-
swered earlier than X obtained it. Mr. Gannon had so
many requests for particulars of his circuit that he
wrote in to us, and particulars have been printed in a
current “Security Valve’’ column.
Mr. Prank Bell. 56 Holder Avenue, Ashfleld, asks if
any reader can provide a duplicate of “Wi-fi Weekly’’
for January 15, 1928. Mr. Bell will likely be happy to pay
for similar.
Mr. L. Hellyer, 36 Younger Avenue, Sydney, requests
that we publish an pressing S.O.S. for a duplicate of
“W.W.” dated June 29, 1928, beneath the standard con-
ditions, i.e., postage paid.
Mr. O’Brien.—Re your letter not too long ago printed in
the “Security Valve” in reference to Choose-ups, I
have a few letters right here for you. Please ship
your deal with.
P.L.Q. (Sydney).—Sorry I’ve not Mr. O’Brien’s
deal with; maybe he’ll see the above be aware. We’ll
hope so, anyway.
R.N. (Annandale).—Construct the Marco 4, Vol.
11, No. 2.
G.W. (Narrandera). —Thanks for the coupon.
The place’s your letter?
No Identify (Victoria). —Sorry now we have no copies of
the Marco Pour. The circuit appeared in these
columns every week or so in the past. This receiver will swimsuit
your necessities. If any readers have a spare
copy of this subject, No Identify, of Redcliffs, Victoria,
want to pay money for this subject.
C.V.W. (Forest Lodge).—Your request Can’t be
answered by these columns. It could take up
an excessive amount of house. I shall jot down your suggestion,
and when time permits, will likely be happy to present you
an article with reference to A Eliminators.
A.J.S. (Inverell). —The Penthode valve is the same as
two atypical three aspect valves, transformer
coupled, offering all potentials are appropriate. (2)
Sure, in a later subject. (3) It is much better to make use of
separate condensers. Ganged condensers could also be
used if the filament returns are widespread, and if
the condensers to be ganged have the identical capability.
It’s simpler to separate stations when greater than
one management is used. (4) Sure, a excessive grid bias
can be obligatory and this ‘is essential with the
valve talked about.
J.C. (Hurlstone Park).—Sure, the three condensers
within the Peridyne could also be ganged. Don’t advise it,
nevertheless, for causes outlined briefly reply to A.J.S.
(Inverell), above. In the event you want specs for
winding your individual Peridyne kits, write to Metropoli-
tan Electrical, who can provide your necessities in
higher element . than is feasible by these col-
umns. The final stage of A.P. may very well be reduce out when
not required through the use of a D.P. jack. The wave-trap
concept is O.Okay.
A.W. (Waterloo).—lt just isn’t doable to guage the
wave-length by the numbers showing in your tun-
ing dials. Recommend you’ve got the receiver calibrated
and use a wave-metre. It is going to be a easy matter
then to tune in on inter-State wave-lengths.
A.G. (Muttaburra). —A wonderful concept in idea,
however troublesome in follow, owing to the truth that the
coils can be too cumbersome with screened coils. Be-
sides there are few informal listeners who would care
to be bothered with altering coils each time they
desired to take heed to a distinct station. Nonetheless,
you’re to be congratulated on the thought you’ve got
evidently put into the thought. Strive bettering it within the
path talked about above. Good luck!
R.S. (Mundubberra). —I’ve put a discover in these
columns within the hope that Mr. O’Brien sees it- If
so, I’ll ahead your letter as quickly as I obtain
his deal with.
L.T. (Croydon).—The transformer talked about in
the article “The Stability Transmitter” was made
by Colville, Moore, Ltd., Rowe Avenue, Sydney. The
filament voltage of the UX2BI is 7.5 volts., present
consumption 1 ampere.
A.C.T. (Drummoyne).—The grid-leak or condenser
is defective. Glad you appreciated the Ultimax. One reader
pulls within the Japs on his version!
C.C.M. (Marrickville).—ln place of the home-made
choke for the short-wave receiver, you should use the
secondary of an previous transformer. Any of the higher
make of six-volt valves can be utilized, similar to Philips’,
Cossor, Mullard, Radiotron, and many others.. In the event you want to
use Philips’ get an A 615 for the detector, and an
A 609 for the audio. Radiotron 201 A’s could also be used
if desired.
A.M.A. (Clarence River). —Both the response coil
or the response condenser has too massive capability.
Strive reversing the connections to the response coil.
Additionally strive transferring it additional away from the secondary.
G. (Bexley).—The A.R.R.L. Handbook will give
you a wide variety of transmitters. It’s obligatory
to get your license earlier than you transmit. Sorry I
can’t oblige concerning particulars of the microphone I
talked about in my article “Proving Radio,” for have been
I to publish it right here I needs to be stepping forward of
the collection. Simply comply with the articles as they seem—
you need to stroll earlier than you’ll be able to run, you understand.
Mr. G. Morgan, Oakwood, 153 Wardell Highway, Dul-
wich Hill, writes: —“I’ve a duplicate of the Marco
Pour doing nothing however sleep. Some troubled rea-
der would possibly like this subject, and he can have it, if it
will convey him happiness, by writing me on the
above deal with. I constructed the Marco Pour 12 months
in the past, and use the biggest Amplion speaker made, on
two valves, for native stuff.” Thanks, Mr. Morgan.
May final for years with affordable care. Traditional
100 per cent, life is about two years. Nonetheless, dangerous
cells can all the time get replaced, in order that the moist B can
all the time be stored on top of things. Thanks for sort
remarks. Similar to your self!
W.A. (Parkes). —Evidently the coils are usually not de-
signed to cowl the whole 200-500 metre band.
Take away six turns off the secondary coil.
C.J.H. (Henty).—Place it wherever as long as the
ends of the coil are handy to the terminals.
H. (Bondi Bell.)—-You say you’ve got constructed the
Nilcost and get the identical outcomes as you get in your
six-valver as regards quantity, and many others., however you can’t
pull in inter-State. In the event you learn by the’ article
you’ll discover that the receiver was probably not meant
for reception of inter-State stations. It’s extra a
receiver for affordable reception of native stations.
“Quick Wave” (Newcastle). —The most effective technique of
adapting your superhet to short-waves is to make use of a
short-wave adaptor (circuit appeared every week or two
again in these columns).

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Inside Again Cowl – Amalgamated Wi-fi (Australasia) Advert[edit]

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t
-A

Alter ment of the brand new Marconi
Cone Loud Speaker is on the
entrance. The cone is protected at
the hack bj a steel bracket
Worth ■ • £5
heJ^eulMarconi
mlves and Audio system
THE proved effectivity of the brand new Marconi
valves and audio system is the results of years
of cautious analysis by the engineers of the
Marconi Firm, England.
Three years intensified analysis in loud speaker
manufacturing introduces the final word in cone loud
audio system—the brand new Marconi cone—This new
loud speaker meets each exacting situation,
bringing a completely new conception of broad-
solid leisure.
The brand new Marconi valves, obtainable in two, 4
and 6 volt collection, are famous for his or her economic system
of operation with regard to each “A” and “ B ”
batteries. They guarantee a most of undis-
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The New Marconi Valves are
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Danger of breakage throughout transit
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Again Cowl – Amplion Advert[edit]

<°,aj*TßY (P „ OWHERI WIRELE// /ET/ The Amplion Garboncel dif- fers from an accumulator in that no electrical energy is required for re-charging. Virtually no consideration is required and your hi fi won't ever be out of motion as far as “A” battery is con- cerned. “A” Battery Troubles Eradicated. No. 229 - 32/6 aMPIIOn CArboncH The chemical used is a straightforward innocent salt. The required amount is merely dissolved in water, poured into the Automotive- boncel, which is then prepared to be used. Such a cell will give as much as 12 months’ service with- out additional charging. The Amplion is the one main battery which is able to successfully substitute an accumulator. Chemically Generates Its Personal Electrical Present. NO Electrical Energy Needed Acids Fumes Odor p (A/sia) Ltd. Bradbury Home, 53-55 York St., SYDNEY & <0 s e? /v y / v S c>-V
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Again Cowl – Publication Be aware[edit]

Printed by Godfrey Blunden, of Lorne Flats, Greenknowe Avenue, Darlinghurst, for the proprietors, Messrs. Wi-fi Newspapers Ltd., 51 Castlereagh Avenue,
Sydney, and printed by the Every day Telegraph Pictorial Ltd., King Avenue, Sydney, and Mortons Ltd., Chalmers Avenue, Sydney.


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