rot – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English rotten, roten, from Previous English rotian (to rot, develop into corrupted, ulcerate, putrefy), from Proto-Germanic *rutāną (to rot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rot (third-person singular easy current rots, current participle rotting, easy previous and previous participle rotted)

  1. (intransitive) To undergo decomposition as a result of organic motion, particularly by fungi or micro organism.

    The apple left within the cabinet all that point had began to rot.

  2. (intransitive) To say no in operate or utility.

    Your mind will rot should you spend a lot time on the pc, Tony!

  3. (transitive, intransitive) To (trigger to) deteriorate in any approach, as in morals; to deprave.
  4. (transitive) To make putrid; to trigger to be wholly or partially decomposed by pure processes.

    to rot vegetable fiber

  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To spend a protracted time period (in an disagreeable place).

    to rot in jail

    to rot in Hell

    • 4 of the victims have been left to rot in irons.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Guide of Snobs
      Rot, poor bachelor, in your membership.
  6. (transitive) To show, as flax, to a strategy of maceration, and many others., for the aim of separating the fiber; to ret.
  7. (dated, slang) To speak nonsense.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot (countable and uncountable, plural rots)

  1. The method of turning into rotten; putrefaction.
  2. Decaying matter.
    • 2016, Nathanael Johnson, Unseen Metropolis, →ISBN, web page 115:

      When a turkey vulture detects the scent of rot, it circles down, tracing the plume of chemical substances to its supply.

  3. Any of a number of illnesses through which breakdown of tissue happens.
    • 1658–1663, John Milton, Paradise Misplaced:

      His cattle should of rot and murrain die.

  4. (uncountable) Verbal nonsense.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch rot, dialectal type of rat.

Noun[edit]

rot (plural rotte)

  1. rat

See additionally[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Excessive German rōt (pink, red-haired), from Previous Excessive German rōt (pink, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz. Cognate with German rot, Dutch rood, English pink, West Frisian learn, Danish rød.

Adjective[edit]

rot

  1. (Formazza) pink

References[edit]

  • “rot” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot m (plural rots)

  1. belch

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See rotten

Adjective[edit]

rot (comparative rotter, superlative rotst)

  1. rotten, spoiled, decayed, putrid
  2. rotten, tedious, unkind, imply
Inflection[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot n (plural rotten, diminutive rotje n)

  1. rot, one thing rotten, one thing rotting

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center Dutch rotte.

Noun[edit]

rot f (plural rotten, diminutive rotje n)

  1. (dialectal, Northern) Various type of rat.

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center Dutch rote.

Noun[edit]

rot n or f (plural rotten, diminutive rotje n)

  1. (army) a file (of males)
  2. (out of date) multitude, band, throng
    Synonyms: drom, massa, menigte, schare

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Latin ructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot m (plural rots)

  1. (colloquial) belch, burp

Synonyms[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ruptus.

Adjective[edit]

rot (female rote)

  1. damaged

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]


Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Excessive German rōt (pink, red-haired), from Previous Excessive German rōt (pink, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-. Examine Low German root, rod, rot, Dutch rood, English pink, West Frisian learn, Danish rød.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rot (comparative röter or roter, superlative am rötesten or am rotesten)

  1. pink (color)
  2. (politics) pink; pertaining to Marxism within the widest sense; social democratic; socialist; communist
    1. (politics, Germany, specifically) pertaining to the social democratic SPD or the extra rigidly socialist Linke
  3. (probably mildly offensive) red-haired
  4. (historic, probably offensive) redskin; Native American; Indian

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “rot” in Duden on-line

German Low German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rot

  1. Various spelling of root

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot n (genitive singular rots, no plural)

  1. unconsciousness, insensibility
Declension[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See rotna

Noun[edit]

rot n (genitive singular rots, nominative plural rot)

  1. rot, decay, putrefaction
Declension[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Center English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Late Previous English rōt.

Noun[edit]

rot

  1. Various type of rote (root)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous English rotian.

Verb[edit]

rot

  1. Various type of roten (to rot)

Etymology 3[edit]

A back-formation from roten (to rot).

Various kinds[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot (uncountable)

  1. Rotting or decomposition; the scenario the place one thing rots.
  2. Any illness which causes decaying and decomposition in people.
  3. A illness that afflicts sheep; footrot, the rot.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds.

Noun[edit]

rot m or f (particular singular rota or roten, indefinite plural røtter, particular plural røttene)

  1. root (a part of a plant usually beneath floor degree)
  2. root (of a tooth)
  3. root (of a hair)
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

rot

  1. crucial of rote

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. Akin to English root.

Noun[edit]

rot f (particular singular rota, indefinite plural røter, particular plural røtene)

  1. root (of a plant)
  2. root (of a tooth)
  3. root (of a hair)

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Previous Norse rót

Noun[edit]

rot n (particular singular rotet, uncountable)

  1. a mess, untidiness, chaos
    Det er for mykje rot på loftet. Me må rydda.

    The attic is a mess. Now we have to tidy it up.
    Når me prøver å samarbeida med dei, blir det berre rot.

    Once we attempt working with them, it simply turns into chaos.

References[edit]


Previous Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *raudaz.

Adjective[edit]

rōt

  1. pink

Inflection[edit]

This adjective wants an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “rōt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Previous Excessive German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-.

Adjective[edit]

rōt

  1. pink

Descendants[edit]


Previous Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts.

Noun[edit]

rōt f

  1. root

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Excessive German rōt, from Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz. Examine German rot, Dutch rood, English pink.

Adjective[edit]

rot

  1. pink

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot f

  1. genitive plural of rota

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Swedish rōt, from Previous Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rot c

  1. root; the a part of a plant underneath the floor.
  2. the a part of a tooth extending into the bone holding the tooth in place
  3. supply; an underlying trigger
    Kärleken until pengar är roten until allt ont.

    The love of cash is the basis of all evil.
  4. (arithmetic) of a quantity n, a optimistic quantity which, when raised to a specified energy, yields n; the sq. root is known if no energy is specified
    Kubikroten ur 27 är 3.

    The dice root of 27 is 3.
    Multiplicera med roten ur 2.

    Multiply by root 2.
  5. (arithmetic) a zero (of a operate).
  6. (arithmetic) a delegated node in a tree.
  7. (arithmetic) curl; a measure on how briskly a vector area rotates: it may be described because the cross product of del and a given vectorial area
  8. (computing) root listing
  9. (philology) a phrase from which one other phrase is derived.

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

See additionally[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English street.

Noun[edit]

rot

  1. street, road
    • 2003, Mühlhäusler et al., Tok Pisin texts, John Benjamins Publishing Firm, web page 9:
      Planti liklik rot i stap lengthy ailan hia.

      Many little roads exist on this island.

References[edit]

Tok Pisin texts: from the start to the current / edited by Peter Mühlhäusler, Thomas E. Dutton, Suzanne Romaine. / John Benjamins Publishing Firm / Copyright 2003 / →ISBN / web page 106


Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian rata (installment)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rōt f (plural rota)

  1. installment (a sort of fee)

admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top