set – Wiktionary

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English setten, from Previous English settan, from Proto-Germanic *satjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sodéyeti, causative of *sed- (to take a seat).

Verb[edit]

set (third-person singular easy current units, current participle setting, easy previous set, previous participle set or (dialectal) setten)

  1. (transitive) To place (one thing) down, to relaxation.
    Synonyms: put, lay, set down
    Antonym: choose up
  2. (transitive) To connect or affix (one thing) to one thing else, or in or upon a sure place.
    I’ve set my coronary heart on working the marathon.
  3. (transitive) To place in a specified situation or state; to trigger to be.
    • The Lord thy God will set thee on excessive.
    • I’m come to set a person at variance towards his father, and the daughter towards her mom.
    • 1827, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Hamlet
      Each incident units him pondering.
  4. (transitive) To begin (a fireplace).
    Synonym: mild
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
  5. (transitive, dated) To trigger to cease or stick; to hinder; to lock to a spot.
    to set a coach within the mud
  6. (transitive) To find out or settle.

    to set the lease

  7. (transitive) To regulate.

    I set the alarm at 6 a.m.

    (i.e. I programmed it at that hour to go off at a later time)

    I set the alarm for six a.m.

    (i.e. I programmed it earlier to go off at that hour.)

  8. (transitive) To punch (a nail) into wooden in order that its head is under the floor.
  9. (transitive) To rearrange with dishes and cutlery, to set the desk.

    Please set the desk for our visitors.

  10. (transitive) To introduce or describe.

    I’ll inform you what occurred, however first let me set the scene.

  11. (transitive) To find (a play, and so on.); to assign a backdrop to, geographically or temporally.

    He says he’ll set his subsequent movie in France.

    Her debut novel is set in the course of the U.S. Civil Conflict.

  12. (transitive) To compile, to make (a puzzle or problem).
    This crossword was set by Araucaria.
  13. (transitive) To arrange (a stage or movie set).
  14. (transitive) To suit (somebody) up in a scenario.
  15. (transitive) To rearrange (sort).

    It was a posh web page, however he set it shortly.

  16. (transitive) To plan and assign (work) to.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, “Finland spreads phrase on colleges”, in The Guardian Weekly, quantity 189, quantity 6, web page 30:

      Think about a rustic the place kids do nothing however play till they begin obligatory education at age seven. Then, with out exception, they attend comprehensives till the age of 16. Charging college charges is against the law, and so is sorting pupils into potential teams by streaming or setting.

    The instructor set her college students the duty of drawing a foot.

  17. (transitive, volleyball) To direct (the ball) to a teammate for an assault.
  18. (intransitive) To solidify.

    The glue units in 4 minutes.

  19. (transitive) To render stiff or strong; particularly, to transform into curd; to curdle.
    to set milk for cheese
  20. (intransitive) Of a heavenly physique, to vanish under the horizon of a planet, and so on, because the latter rotates.

    The moon units at eight o’clock tonight.

  21. (transitive, bridge) To defeat a contract.
  22. (out of date, now adopted by “out”, as in set out) To start to maneuver; to go forth.
  23. (transitive, botany) To provide after pollination.
    • 2012, Daniel Chamovitz, What a Plant Is aware of, p. 155
      Many fruit bushes will solely flower and set fruit following a chilly winter.

    to set seed

  24. (intransitive, of fruit) To be mounted for progress; to strike root; to start to germinate or kind.
    • 1906, Canada. Dept. of Agriculture. Fruit Department, Fruit crop report
      Within the Annapolis Valley, regardless of an irregular bloom, the fruit has set properly and has, as but, been little affected by scab.
  25. (intransitive, Southern US, Midwestern US, dialects) To take a seat (be in a seated place).
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      Previous Applegate, within the stern, simply set and checked out me, and Lord James, amidship, waved each arms and saved hollering for assist. I took a few eternal large strokes and managed to seize maintain of the skiff’s rail, near the strict.

    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, web page 227:
      And if Mrs. Garner did not want me proper there within the kitchen, I may get a chair and also you and me may set on the market whereas I did the greens.

    He units in that chair all day.

  26. To hunt recreation with the help of a setter.
  27. (looking, transitive, intransitive) Of a canine, to point the place of recreation.
    The canine units the fowl.
    Your canine units properly.
  28. To use oneself; to undertake earnestly.
    • 1654, Henry Hammond, Of Fundamentals…
      If he set industriously and sincerely to carry out the instructions of Christ, he can don’t have any floor of doubting but it surely shall show profitable to him.
  29. (transitive, intransitive) To suit music to phrases.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  30. (transitive, intransitive) To put vegetation or shoots within the floor; to plant.
    to set pear bushes in an orchard
  31. To develop into mounted or inflexible; to be fixed.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  32. To have a sure route of movement; to movement; to maneuver on; to have a tendency.
    The present units to the north; the tide units to the windward.
  33. (intransitive, nation dancing) To acknowledge a dancing companion by dealing with her or him and transferring first to 1 facet after which to the opposite, whereas he or she does the other.
    Set to companions! was the following instruction from the caller.
  34. To put or repair in a setting.
    to set a valuable stone in a border of steel
    to set glass in a sash
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar: Or, the Double Discovery. [], London: [] Richard Tonson and Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 6484883, Act IV, web page 58:

      And him too wealthy a jewel to be set / In vulgar steel for a vulgar use.

  35. To place so as in a specific method; to arrange.
    to set (that’s, to hone) a razor
    to set a noticed
  36. To increase and produce into place; to unfold.
    to set the sails of a ship
  37. To offer a pitch to, as a tune; to start out by fixing the keynote.
    to set a psalm
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Fielding to this entry?)
  38. To cut back from a dislocated or fractured state.
    to set a damaged bone
  39. (masonry) To decrease into place and repair solidly, because the blocks of reduce stone in a construction.
  40. (out of date) To wager in playing; to threat.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iv]:

      I’ve set my life upon a forged, / And I’ll stand the hazard of the die.

  41. To adorn with one thing infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects positioned right here and there.
    • Excessive on their heads, with jewels richly set, / Every woman wore a radiant coronet.
    • 1815. William Wordsworth, Poems of the Creativeness
      pastoral dales skinny set with trendy farms
  42. (out of date) To worth; to fee; used with at.
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second A part of Henry the Fourth, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:

      Be you contented, sporting now the garland, / To have a son set your decrees at naught.

    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iv]:

      I don’t set my life at a pin’s price.

  43. To determine as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign.
    to set a great instance
  44. (Scotland) To swimsuit; to develop into.
    It units him in poor health.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English set, sette, from Previous English set (seat, place of residence, camp, settlement, entrenchment, steady, pen), from Proto-West Germanic *set (seat), from Proto-Germanic *setą (seat).

Noun[edit]

set (plural units)

  1. A punch for setting nails in wooden.
    nail set
  2. A tool for receiving broadcast radio waves (or, extra just lately, broadcast knowledge); a radio or tv.
    tv set
  3. Various type of sett: a gap made and lived in by a badger.
  4. Various type of sett: sample of threads and yarns.
  5. Various type of sett: piece of quarried stone.
  6. (horticulture) A small tuber or bulb used as a substitute of seed, notably onion units and potato units.
  7. The quantity the enamel of a noticed protrude to the facet to be able to create the kerf.
  8. (out of date, uncommon) That which is staked; a wager; therefore, a playing recreation.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Lifetime of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii]:

      We are going to in France, by God’s grace, play a set / Shall strike his father’s crown into the hazard.

    • That was however civil struggle, an equal set.
  9. (engineering) Everlasting change of form brought on by extreme pressure, as from compression, rigidity, bending, twisting, and so on.
    the set of a spring
  10. A bias of thoughts; an angle or sample of behaviour.
  11. (piledriving) A chunk positioned briefly upon the top of a pile when the latter can not in any other case be reached by the load, or hammer.
  12. (printing, dated) The width of the physique of a sort.
  13. A younger oyster when first connected.
  14. Collectively, the crop of younger oysters in any locality.
  15. A collection or group of one thing. (Be aware the same that means in Etymology 4, Noun)
  16. (colloquial) The way, state, or high quality of setting or becoming; match.
    the set of a coat
  17. The sample of a tartan, and so on.
  18. The camber of a curved roofing tile.
  19. The complete variety of eggs set below a hen.
Translations[edit]
The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English sett, from Previous English ġesett, previous participle of settan.

Adjective[edit]

set (comparative extra set, superlative most set)

  1. Mounted in place.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Pattern, “Irregular bedtimes might have an effect on kids’s brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, quantity 189, quantity 6, web page 34:

      Irregular bedtimes might disrupt wholesome mind growth in younger kids, in accordance with a examine of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to mattress at a special time every evening affected ladies greater than boys, however each fared worse on psychological duties than kids who had a set bedtime, researchers discovered.

  2. Inflexible, solidified.
  3. Prepared, ready.
  4. Intent, decided (to do one thing).
    • 1892, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Wrecker, web page 158:

      And he or she likes you a lot, and thinks you so achieved and distingue-looking, and was simply as set as I used to be to have you ever for greatest man.

    set on attending to his vacation spot

  5. Prearranged.

    a set menu

  6. Mounted in a single’s opinion.

    I’m set towards the concept of smacking kids to punish them.

  7. (of hair) Mounted in a sure fashion.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under must be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Center English set, sete, sette (that which is about, the act of setting, seat), from Previous English set (setting, seat, a spot the place folks stay, habitation, camp, entrenchment, a spot the place animals are saved, stall, fold) and Previous English seten (a set, shoot, slip, department; a nursery, plantation; that which is planted or set; a cultivated place; planting, cultivation; a setting, placing; a stopping; occupied land), associated to Previous English settan (to set). Evaluate Center Low German gesette (a set, suite), Previous English gesetl (meeting). In response to Skeat, in senses denoting a gaggle of issues or individuals, representing an alteration of sept, from Previous French sette (a spiritual sect), from Medieval Latin secta (retinue), from Latin secta (a faction). See sect. It’s fairly potential that the trendy phrase is extra of a merger between each, nevertheless.

Noun[edit]

set (plural units)

  1. A younger plant match for setting out; a slip; shoot.
  2. A rudimentary fruit.
  3. The setting of the solar or different luminary; (by extension) the shut of the day.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Adeline
      the set of day
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:

      The weary solar hath made a golden set.

  4. (actually and figuratively) Common motion; route; drift; tendency.
    • 1840, Thomas De Quincey, Model
      Right here and there, amongst people alive to the actual evils of the age, and watching the very set of the present, there might have been even a extra systematic counteraction utilized to the mischief.
    • 1951, Herman Wouk, The Caine Mutiny, web page 238:

      He put his eye to the alidade. “I assumed so! Zero 5 4 and that is permitting nothing for set and drift alongside the road of bearing. We’re contained in the departure level now []

  5. An identical assortment of comparable issues. (Be aware the same that means in Etymology 1, Noun.)
    a set of tables
  6. A set of assorted objects for a specific objective.
    a set of instruments
  7. An object made up of a number of elements.
    a set of steps
  8. (set idea) A set of zero or extra objects, probably infinite in dimension, and disregarding any order or repetition of the objects which can be contained inside it.
  9. (in plural, “units”, arithmetic, casual) Set idea.
  10. A gaggle of individuals, often assembly socially.
    the nation set
  11. The surroundings for a movie or play.
  12. (dance) The preliminary or fundamental formation of dancers.
  13. (train) A gaggle of repetitions of a single train carried out one after the opposite with out relaxation.
    • 1974, Charles Gaines & George Butler, Pumping Iron: The Artwork and Sport of Bodybuilding, web page 22.
      That is the fourth set of benchpresses.
  14. (tennis) An entire collection of video games, forming a part of a match.
  15. (volleyball) An entire collection of factors, forming a part of a match.
  16. (volleyball) The act of directing the ball to a teammate for an assault.
  17. (music) A musical efficiency by a band, disc jockey, and so on., consisting of a number of musical items.
    • 2017 June 26, Alexis Petridis, “Glastonbury 2017 verdict: Radiohead, Foo Fighters, Lorde, Stormzy and extra”, in the Guardian[1]:

      You heard “oh, Jeremy Corbyn” in every single place: on the silent disco, throughout Radiohead’s Friday evening headlining set, halfway by the Different stage look by rapper Stormzy, who gamely joined in.

  18. (music) A drum package, a drum set.
    He performs the set on Saturdays.
  19. (Britain, training) A category group in a topic the place pupils are divided by potential.
    • 2012 April 26, “Themes: Pupil grouping and organisation of courses”, in (Please present the guide title or journal title)[2], Division for Schooling:

      pupil attainment, the examine discovered that college students with the identical Key Stage Three scores may have their GCSE grade raised or lowered by as much as half a grade on account of being positioned in the next or decrease set.

  20. (poker, slang) Three of a sort, particularly if two playing cards are in a single’s hand and the third is on the board. Evaluate journeys (three of a sort, particularly with two playing cards on the board and one in a single’s hand).[1]
Synonyms[edit]
  • (shut of the day): nightfall, eve, night, sunset, sundown
  • (normal motion): route, drift, heading, movement, motion, path, tendency, development
  • (matching assortment of comparable issues): suite
  • (set idea, in plural): set idea
  • (group of individuals, often assembly socially): membership, coterie
  • (surroundings): surroundings
  • (efficiency of a number of musical items): gig, session
  • (drum package): drums, drum package, drum set
  • (three of a sort): three of a sort
Hypernyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

(This etymology is lacking or incomplete. Please add to it, or talk about it on the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

set (third-person singular easy current units, current participle setting, easy previous and previous participle setted)

  1. (Britain, training) To divide a category group in a topic in accordance with potential
    • 2008, Patricia Murphy, Robert McCormick, Data and Apply: Representations and Identities
      In setted courses, college students are introduced collectively as a result of they’re believed to be of comparable ‘potential’. But, setted classes are sometimes performed as if college students will not be solely comparable, however an identical—when it comes to potential, most popular studying fashion and tempo of working.
    • 2002, Jo Boaler, Experiencing Faculty Arithmetic: Conventional and Reform Approaches and Their Affect on Scholar Studying:

      At Amber Hill, setting was a high-profile idea, and the scholars had been ceaselessly reminded of the set to which they belonged.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • -est, EST, ETS, ETs, Est, Est., STE, StE, Ste, Ste., TEs, TSE, Tse, est, est., tse

Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

set (plural [please provide])

  1. The title of the Latin-script letter Z.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Previous Occitan, from Latin septem (seven), from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

set m or f

  1. seven

Noun[edit]

set m (plural units)

  1. seven

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set f (plural units)

  1. thirst
Derived phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Noun[edit]

set

  1. couch, sofa, sofa

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English set.

Noun[edit]

set m

  1. (tennis, volleyball) set (a part of a match in sports activities like tennis and volleyball)
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the primary entry.

Noun[edit]

set

  1. genitive plural of sto

Additional studying[edit]


Verb[edit]

set

  1. previous participle of se

Derived phrases[edit]


Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set m (plural units, diminutive setje n)

  1. A set (assortment of objects belonging collectively).
  2. A set (set up consisting of a number of home equipment).
  3. (tennis) A set (tennis match).
  4. A movie set (filming location).
    Synonym: filmset

Derived phrases[edit]


Japanese Durango Nahuatl[edit]

Noun[edit]

set

  1. ice

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set m (plural units)

  1. (tennis) set

Synonyms[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛt]
  • Hyphenation: sèt

Etymology 1[edit]

From English set, alteration of sept, from Previous French sette (a spiritual sect), from Medieval Latin secta (retinue), from Latin secta (a faction).

Noun[edit]

sèt (plural, first-person possessive setku, second-person possessive setmu, third-person possessive setnya)

  1. (sports activities) set, group of video games counting as a unit towards a match.
    Synonym: babak
  2. set,
    1. an identical assortment of comparable issues.
    2. a set of assorted objects for a specific objective.
    Synonyms: perangkat, setel
  3. set, an object made up of a number of elements.

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English set, from Center English setten, from Previous English settan, from Proto-Germanic *satjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sodéyeti, causative of *sed- (to take a seat).

Verb[edit]

sèt

  1. to set
    1. to place in a specified situation or state.
    2. to regulate.
    3. to arrange.
    4. to rearrange.
    Synonym: mengeset

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of strategi (technique)

Noun[edit]

set (plural, first-person possessive setku, second-person possessive setmu, third-person possessive setnya)

  1. (colloquial) trick; act; technique
    Synonyms: muslihat, tindak, strategi

Additional studying[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English set.

Noun[edit]

set m (invariable)

  1. set (group of issues in maths, tennis, cinema, and so on.)

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Latin septem.

Adjective[edit]

set

  1. seven

Noun[edit]

set m (uncountable)

  1. seven

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

set

  1. Various type of sed
    • c. 1300, Tractatus de Ponderibus et Mensuris
    • sexies viginti petre faciunt carrum plumbi scilicet magnum carrum London’ set carrus del Peek est multo minus.
      • Six occasions twenty stone make the load of lead, scilicet the good London load, however the load of Peek is far much less.

Decrease Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

set

  1. supine of seś

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French sept.

Numeral[edit]

set

  1. seven

Etymology[edit]

From French sept.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

set

  1. seven

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

set

  1. current tense of setja, setje, setta and sette
  2. crucial of setja and setje

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

set

  1. (non-standard since 1938) previous participle of sjå

Numeral[edit]

set

  1. seven

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis.

Noun[edit]

set f or m (plural units)

  1. thirst

Numeral[edit]

Occitan cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set

set (Limousin)

  1. seven

Various kinds[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari normal occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 version, →ISBN, web page 910.

Previous English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Evaluate the verb settan. Evaluate Previous Norse sæti (whence trendy English seat), Previous Excessive German gesazi (German Gesäß), Center Dutch gesaete, from Proto-Germanic *sētiją.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set n

  1. seat

Declension[edit]

This noun wants an inflection-table template.

Associated phrases[edit]


Previous French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin septem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cardinal quantity
7 Earlier: sis
Subsequent: uit

set

  1. seven
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

see savoir

Verb[edit]

set

  1. third-person singular current indicative of savoir
Descendants[edit]

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish sed and Portuguese sede and Kabuverdianu sedi.

Noun[edit]

set

  1. thirst

Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin septem, from Proto-Italic *septem. Cognates embody Italian sette and French sept.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

set

  1. seven

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English set.

Noun[edit]

set m inan

  1. (badminton, tennis, volleyball) set (a part of the sport in badminton, tennis, or volleyball)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

set f

  1. genitive plural of seta

Additional studying[edit]

  • set in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • set in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set m (plural units)

  1. set (group of issues in maths, tennis, cinema, and so on.)

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Quantity[edit]

set

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) seven
Various kinds[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, lower).

Noun[edit]

set f

  1. (Sutsilvan) thirst
Various kinds[edit]
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) mentioned
  • (Sursilvan) seit
  • (Surmiran) seid

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set m (plural units)

  1. (tennis) set

Additional studying[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English set.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set n

  1. a set (matching assortment of things)
  2. a set (in tennis)

Declension[edit]

See additionally[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Numeral[edit]

set

  1. seven

Verb[edit]

set (not mutable)

  1. Contraction of baset.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous Norse sæti, from Proto-Germanic *sētiją. Confer the English seat.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

set n (particular singular sete, particular plural seta)

  1. seat, bench
  2. haycock

Derived phrases[edit]

Verb[edit]

set (preterite seett, supine sett)

  1. to cock hay

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